questionswinters coming, anyone have any recommendations…

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I don't have any suggestions, but I'm paying attention to see what others suggest. I also have drafty windows which I am reluctant to replace (size, overall look in the house with the older style) but haven't yet gotten any special kinds of curtains to block the draft. I think that will be a purchase this fall.

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Replacing weatherstripping will go a looooong way toward stopping drafts. That includes the threshold seal under the door as well as getting a good seal around the outside edges of your door stop trim.

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@jsimsace: Any recommendation on type of weatherstripping? Or perhaps a video or website to make sure I'm doing it right? (I like to second guess myself a bit on things I'm not 100% on!) Also... Waffles.

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Here are some articles from the This Old House site.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/intro/0,,20152571,00.html

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/article/0,,1120083,00.html

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/asktoh/question/0,,213093,00.html

They have more, I just searched on weather stripping. The web site for the magazine The Family Handyman is also a good source for DIY projects.

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I was hoping this post had something to do with House Stark of Winterfell. They'd just throw more peat on the fire.

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I can get back to you tomorrow, but it depends on the type of door that you have. If it's a "modern" metal door, there will be a kerf (saw cut) in the area just outside of your door. This is replaceable by a "refill". Older houses can vary wildly. I recommend a nail-on vinyl type that pushes up against the door. Again, I could tell you more tomorrow. :)

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ok. old house tips for those that can't afford to renovate:
1. wear layers
2. fingerless gloves
3. space heaters
4. close off any room not in use (not just the vent in that room)
5. an old tub sock stuffed with wornout clothes is a great draft guard
6. blankets on every chair, couch, bed
7. ceiling fans do make a difference, just make sure they are turning right
8. plastic wrap the inside and the outside of the windows
9. go to thrift shops for the 1950's type insulated curtains (they may be ugly, but they work wonders, and you can hang something nicer on the inside with safety pins)
10. triple expanding foam is your friend
11. check your basement for extra drafts (holes in between bricks)
12. check the insulation on your water pipes
13. house shoes with rubber soles
14. expect feet on the furniture so have covers on the nicer furniture
15. candles make heat when burned
16. check your insulation in the attic for bare spots
17. fireplaces help--if the chimney has been cleaned lately

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I use those cheap (like, $1.25 or less each) towels in the windows, plus insulated curtains (or blankets, because we're poor). Works pretty good.

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I used twin draft guards in my old apartment, and it helped a ton. They aren't high quality and it was on the porch door, which I never used when it was cold, but if you don't plan on opening that particular door very much they're actually a really good solution.

Otherwise for common doors and stuff they get annoying and bad. I guess weatherstripping it your easiest solution then, unless you want to fuss with the twin draft guard and only count on it for one season.

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@anorion: Gotta do what works, God knows we do. Smiles to you! =D

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@jsimsace: My doors are old and rickety wooden pieces of crap. One has a bout a half to three inch gap. (Definitely one of those giant money pits, but rents cheap as long as i can keep the heat bill down.)

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@sskarstad: I came in here in hopes someone would say, "just brace yourself against the door" or something to that effect. I guess that someone is me, now.

On topic, yes to weatherstripping. You can go to Lowe's or Home Depot and they should be able to help you get the right stuff. Also Great Stuff sealing foam is good for larger gaps, and they have a window version that dries semi-flexible.

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@lazyzombie: Err Half to 3/4 inch gap! I'm a dummy.

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thanks for the tips. trying to do a better job of winterizing our 90 yr old house this year.

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Weatherstripping is pretty cheap and should pay off in a season if you have drafty doors. Get the kind that goes around the 3 sides of the door jam, plus a good door sweep for the bottom.

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@tsfisch: Yep, exactly what we have done to our vacation home. It's cheap and very easy to do.

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I gave up years ago. My landlord is a cheap lazy bastard so I just ran masking tape around my doors.
Works very well.

If I had my own place I too would just replace the weatherstripping.

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I've heard good things about those things that slide under the doors. My parents use them at their house, and they've only had positive things to say.

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If your door is loose when closed, you may have to replace the strike plate or even the knob itself before it will seal properly.

As for windows, the clear draft guards that you put over the entire window case works remarkably well.

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I am glad I'm not the only one who thought this was going to be a GoT reference.

As the owner of a 1920's home - everything that @moosezilla said is great advice.

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I didn't forget about you! What I had in mind for your door bottom was this product. It is adjustable and can handle a 3/4" gap with ease (that 3" gap had me concerned). :)