questionsladies (and enlightened gentlemen)- what have…

vote-for47vote-against
vote-for6vote-against

I've had no issues, but I'm pretty sure I'm not the target audience.

Good luck...

vote-for5vote-against

I'm in the same camp as @okham. My wife had a complete hysterectomy in December, so I'm good here. Good luck though!

vote-for23vote-against

I always have to think about the acronym briefly to remember which one is birth control (IUD = Intrauterine Device) and which one is lethal (IED = Improvised Explosive Device). Either way, I hear both are effective methods of birth control.

vote-for23vote-against

Wired just had an incredibly informative article:
http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/07/ff_iud/all/1
Debunks a lot of the problems of the past and gives a visual lesson as to why the legitimate problems existed. I was flabbergasted, that the problem ones were very different shapes, than the ones with no problems. I wouldn't go by just one article, but after reading this one, if I were in the market I would certainly consider them. Good luck!

edit: I hope your Dr. not confused like @capguncowboy:! :D

vote-for8vote-against

@pickypickypicky: that first one looks like a trilobite and I find it too cute to install in my girl parts!

Thanks so much for the article!

vote-for10vote-against

My undergrad alma mater has some closed discussion groups for alumnae and this question was raised recently. With the caveat that I have no personal experience and am summarizing others' posts, the consensus was that insertion was not the most comfortable 30 seconds of one's life, with a few hours of discomfort following, slightly more uncomfortable for those who were nulliparous compared to those who had children. I think one woman in a sexual relationship with a man and one in a sexual relationship with a woman reported that their partner was able to feel the "string," but that was easily solved by trimming it (I assume this required a repeat doctor's visit, but I don't remember if anyone specified that and I'd rather not think too hard about it). Anyway, consensus was 100% supportive - as long as protection against STIs is either not a concern or otherwise addressed, and as long as one does not wish to conceive within the next few years (which would make an IUD not cost-effective).

vote-for8vote-against

I've been away from it for several years, but I used to manage gyn clinics and IUD's were always a great choice for certain patients. As nearly as I can determine, they're currently an even better choice for many more patients. The Wired article mentioned above is a good piece of medical journalism, summarizing the historical and medical issues in an easily read format.

My own clinic-based experience is that with the current brands of IUDs problems tend to surface fairly quickly, most often with more cramping and heavier bleeding than a particular woman can or is willing to accept. I talked with very few women who describe the insertion process as extremely painful; for most it was somewhere between uncomfortable and *really uncomfortable, although it's also very quickly over.

It sounds as if you've done a lot of research and information-gathering already, which makes me think it's a good method for you to try, given your medical history.

vote-for6vote-against

@agingdragqueen: I know, it's true! And that was one of the problem ones. You should only use one that looks like an elegant sculpture, because you should be pretty inside too. Try to think of it as a very exclusive (YMMV) art gallery.

vote-for7vote-against

@neuropsychosocial: Great comments, although I'd add just one caveat. The tail of the IUD is generally fine, soft and very flexible, so that "feeling" it is usually not physically uncomfortable for either gender. However, an IUD tail that is cut too short can be very uncomfortable for a male partner during penatrative sex. Think of the difference between a soft, inch-long beard and two-day chin stubble rubbed against the direction of growth.

vote-for5vote-against

@pickypickypicky: I assume you're being a little imaginative here, since the only part of a properly placed IUD that can be seen is the tail. That said, I love the "pretty inside" imagery!

vote-for6vote-against

I had a mirena for 2 years and I loved it. My hubby never noticed it. I got it removed last fall and got pregnant last winter. I'm going to have another one put in this fall. My only issue with it was that 1 month after having it put it, I had really really bad cramps for about 3 days. Then when I got it removed it took about 3 days to get my hormones back to normal.

vote-for6vote-against

My mom had an IUD once...my brother is now 38 :-)

I'm sure they have improved since then, right?

vote-for3vote-against

@magic cave: Yes, of course, If you put them where you can see them, they won't prevent pregnancy, LOL. I was more commenting about the fact that the one that had a radacally different shape, was also one of the problems, which is not a coincidence, as per the article. It looks like a nanobot. The others have a more organic shape.

vote-for4vote-against

@ohcheri: ha! My mom was telling me about the same thing happened to her. But, they have to be better right?!

vote-for4vote-against

I have looked into them, and they sort of frighten me. "You're telling me that you can jam something in there for 5 years and nothing goes wrong? Are you certain, Doctor? It won't get lost or anything?"

vote-for4vote-against

@purplefeather: I know exactly what you mean! It sorta terrifies me. 5 years is an awful long time to have a foreign object in you, lol.

vote-for6vote-against

I think it every woman responds to pain differently, so you have to take that into consideration.

As for myself, not being able to tolerate the pill, my doctor suggested an IUD. It was many, many years before my husband and I were in a place with our lives to have children, and a series of Copper-7, and later Copper-T IUDs (no hormones) made birth control effortless. (Recommended replacement was every three years.) The cramping of insertion and removal were quick and no worse than those experienced monthly.

I did have two problems with IUDs. The first was when one started coming out by itself (not painful) and had to be replaced. The second was when an incompetent doctor (later stripped of his license) inserted a new IUD without removing the old one! Until it was discovered by my next doctor, I had slightly more cyclic discomfort, but still nothing too bad. (Not recommending that route, as it was probably just luck no permanent damage occurred.)

vote-for5vote-against

@kllangellier @purplefeather: It's important to compare to the alternatives: for many women, taking hormones every day for years on end, with side effects that are common to BCPs, isn't appealing. Plus, the typical failure rate for IUDs are much lower than "typical use" failure rates for both condoms and BCPs.

vote-for3vote-against

@pickypickypicky: An interesting article. Thanks for posting the link.

I don't know what my gf would think of using an IUD, though I'd guess she would be against it based on stories she's heard. Regardless, considering that she is nearing menopause it certainly would make sense for us and, given the cost, be less expensive (and less invasive) than either of us opting for something more permanent.

-

Obligatory joke (being that I'm a guy): The ParaGard really looks cool, maybe something like one of the parts Mr Spock used to build a mnemonic memory circuit in the Star Trek (Original Series) episode The City on the Edge of Forever.

vote-for3vote-against

@neuropsychosocial: "Plus, the typical failure rate for IUDs are much lower than "typical use" failure rates for both condoms and BCPs."

Whoa! There's a "typical use" failure for birth control pills? Glad that didn't happen to me (EVER) when I took them. Thought the only 'failure' was failing to take them for a few days in a row. But, what did I know? Also, had no ill effects from the hormones. IMO, more ill effects from an unwanted/unplanned pregnancy. But then, I am SO beyond all of that. Thankfully.

With no grace whatsoever, I'm backing out of this discussion. Before I go, I wanted to give kudos to @agingdragqueen for asking this question! (Even if you aren't an "aging drag queen." No self-respecting queen would ever ask this question. ...Unless, of course, it was for a dear, dear shy friend.)

vote-for6vote-against

It may seem obvious, but triple check that you do not have any sort of allergic reaction to copper. Complications later because you were unaware of the allergy can be really nasty.

vote-for4vote-against

@gmwhit: Yup, there's a distinction between "perfect use" and "typical use" failure rates for any method of birth control, especially those that rely on user-action (i.e., BCPs need to be ordered at the pharmacy, picked up, taken starting on the right day, taken at exactly the same time every day, rinse lather repeat). With "perfect use," BCPs have a 0.3% failure rate, but the typical use failure rate is 8%, meaning 8 out of every 100 women using BCP to prevent pregnancy are expected to conceive in a given year. For condoms, the perfect use failure rate is quite low (2%), but the typical use failure rate is much higher: 15%! Scary since condoms-only is the most common method of birth control used by sexually active adolescents.

For an especially effective method of BC, I recommend having a personality best described by this shirt: don't let anyone get too close, don't give out more than hugs; so far, 100% effective at preventing pregnancy! :)

vote-for2vote-against

@ohcheri:
my Aunt and uncle had a similar experience, i have 2 cousins that are only 11 mo. apart, second one was born w/ IUD in her hand.

of course they are both near 40 now, so I'm sure the ones in use today are better.

I also know a guy in his early 40's who apparently was REALLY supposed to be born.
his folks were using ALL of the following when he was conceived: the pill,condom,& a contraceptive sponge.
to paraphrase Adam Savage "Failure is ALWAYS an option"

vote-for3vote-against

I have had a Mirena IUD for almost 3 years now, and love it. I can't take regular bc pills or I get migraines, but I'm fine with the ingredients of the mini pill. However, I have enough prescriptions for other reasons, and didn't want to have to worry about taking it at an exact time, so I went for the Mirena (similar drugs to mini pill, but no pill taking).

It was only a little uncomfortable at insertion for me, but I've had 3 kids, which I understand plays a part. I don't remember any discomfort after insertion. I had spotting for several weeks, and now have spotting every few months and no periods. I love it. :)

As for birth control, I always like the idea of having at least one backup, ideally two. One of my kids was conceived despite 2 forms of birth control. Mirena + condom = extra safe imho.

vote-for5vote-against

@agingdragqueen: I dated a woman who used one, and she was very happy with it. During intercourse, the man can experience some discomfort depending on the lady and how the IUD is positioned. Without too much detail, I was unable to take it to 100% due to the pain I would experience. Basically felt like ramming a car into a tree, if you will.

vote-for2vote-against

OK, here are the questions to answer as to the appropriatness of IUDs

1) Is the woman monogamous?
2) Is irregular menstrual bleeding an issue (the IUD will probably increase spotting, maybe permenently)
3) Is the woman most likely done with childbearing but doesn't want permanent sterilization?

If the answers to the above are yes, no, and yes, then the IUD may be a good choice. If any of the answers are different, then IUD use should be approached with caution. The devices create a hostile environment for egg implantation (fertilization still occurs). This is supposed to be reversible, but may not be in some women. This process probably DOES (contrary to the article) contribute to the development of certain STDs in general, and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) in particular. For that reason a woman who is not monogamous probably should also think twice about these methods.

vote-for2vote-against

co worker had one, she got pregnant with it...so user beware

vote-for1vote-against

@gionot: good lord, you had some terrible experiences. I'm really positive about the doc I found up here, so hopefully things will go well. I'm not hugely afraid of the pain, I just know in the past my cervix has been ultra sensitive and I'm just not looking forward to it.

At first I thought posting this would be way to TMI but thanks you guys! I've learned a lot.

vote-for1vote-against

@metaphore: I'm actually blessed with very few allergies (and no metals)- but you're completely right to suggest that.

vote-for1vote-against

@phoenixgirrl: I've found the hormones in Depo have been the ones that work best for me, but they've also made me gain an incredible amount of weight and are really aggravating my arthritis. I'm trying to cut back on senseless meds, and since my girl stuff is working as designed now, I think I'm free to go hormoneless now!

vote-for3vote-against

For anyone still watching the thread: I went ahead and got the copper IUD installed on Friday evening. There were absolutely no issues inserting, but my body seems less than happy to have it in there. Relating/ranting to a couple of my friends, this isn't unusual and I shouldn't worry- so I'm having a real laid back (kinda ouchie) weekend which I think is a fair trade for having this thing last 10 years :)

vote-for3vote-against

@agingdragqueen:

"Installed" always seems somehow wrong, though it is the same word I normally use when discussing my pacemaker.

vote-for1vote-against

@baqui63: I had no idea how else to describe it. The receptionist (and my gyno who is amazing - and if anyone needs one in Seattle, ask!) laughed and laughed, she said she liked that term better than "insertion" which is what they usually use apparently.

They try to be so PC sometimes, but I would consider a pacemaker "installed" too.