questionsare there differences in usb flash drive…

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is it possible the TV writes things to the drive while doing the upgrade? thus the need for the 4gb drive? i'm just guessing here.

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I doubt it but I would try formatting the drive to be NTFS if it is FAT or FAT if NTFS.

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@carl669: There were other 1GB drives that were listed as compatible.

@caffeine_dude: Yeah, that was part of the instructions. The TV didn't recognize the drive at all when it was NTFS (I believe - I can't remember what it was originally, only that it didn't work until I formatted it).

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Reflecting on the time I had to fix a Sony Vaio desktop using standardized parts, I wouldn't put it past Sony to hardcode devices to work with limited & specific devices of their choosing.

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@carl669: fat32 per Sony's instructions.

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@gregorylikescheapstu: Yeah, surprisingly, most of the compatible drives were Sony brand.

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Flashdrives do vary somewhat in throughput speed. Maybe that has something to do with it?

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@benyust2: Quite surprising. :p Since my comment got a few votes, I feel I should qualify it a little...

If that IS the case, it's quite possibly not an exercise in evilness, but in laziness. Firmware updates, of course, do carry some risk and there are a multitude of specialized drives. Not to mention the number of untrustworthy devices. Sony might have just felt it wise to only allow use of the devices that were tested in their facility to perform the task. I might do the same, since people flashing their TV might not comprehend the risk as well as those flashing their computer firmware. (Even that has a reduced number of people with the appropriate amount of sweat and fear.)

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USB drives are all different inside and out, but they essentially do the same things, some better than others. I find name brand USB drives hold up longer and work consistently in more devices than do the really dirt cheap, no-name ones. Crucial Technologies makes the Gizmo & its usually had from Crucial Direct for $10 for a 16 Gb Stick.

Hope I answered your question. Pick a capacity, find a reputable manufacturer, & when yr drive goes on sale, stock up - it isn't like they're gonna go bad if properly cared for. Lastly, you can run disc utilities on them if they start acting funny, but if they show more than a couple of sectors gone bad, send them back to their evil maker (damn the purchase date - I never even mention it) and I've never had them refuse to send me a free replacement drive, all for the cost of postage both ways.