questionsdo you have to deal with false security measures…

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vote-for23vote-against

Roughly 50% of our IT security is false measures.

j5 j5
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We have lots of useless security. I'm supposed to need an electronic access card to get around the building, but there's no single place I can't get to without a card by using alternate routes. In many places I can push right through locked doors that have been that way for 10+ years. About a year ago they spent a large sum on replacing the old system with a new one that had no effect other than making some doors harder to get through for people who were authorized to use them. Unauthorized access is still possible through the detours.

vote-for12vote-against

On Friday I went into my bank for the first time in about a year. I went on my lunch break so the branch I went to was in a more sketchy side of town, and they actually had a "security guard." It was a 19-year-old kid wearing a jacket that said "Security"; he had earphones in and was slouched back in a chair playing on his phone. The only reason he is there is because the cost of hiring him is far less than the jump in their insurance premiums if they didn't. I probably could've stolen his phone right out of his hands and he wouldn't have been able to do anything.

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I used to work at a facility that pre-configured PCs for businesses. This meant lots and lots of computers and components were available. To prevent them from walking out, we had to walk through a metal detector on the way out. The problem was, they had it set way too sensitive. Something as small as the rivets in your jeans would set it off. Which of course resulted in it going off every single time. Rather than adjust it, the guards would just wave everyone through without checking anyone.

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My employer put in an electronic turnstyle a few years ago. It's just a half wall that beeps if you walk through with out swiping your badge. You could easily just walk around it though. I never understood the point.

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I work at a retail store, and there are 2 doors that lead to the offices.
Through door one, you have to go through the kitchen/restroom area, and through a door with a keypad. You must know the keypad code to get to the offices.
Through door two, you can go straight to the offices. Door two is supposed to be closed and locked at all times, but management finds it easier to leave it open, so they don't have to put in the code every time.

vote-for11vote-against

@j5: Tell me about it. My most recent employer set up a campus firewall around the time I started (many years ago). While this was not a bad idea overall, it was not setup intelligently. In particular, the original way to authenticate to a system from outside the firewall (say you had a *nix system you needed to get in to) was via telnet. Granted, it used an obscure (and generally non-telnet) port, but nonetheless wtf?

It was a fantastic way to kill productivity while not improving security. I think the TSA could have teamed up with FEMA and done a better job.

vote-for14vote-against

We have to take all of the money out of our perfectly locked, secured tills at night and put them in an unlocked cabinet where anyone could find it.

Supposedly it's because if we leave the cash registers open and empty, it deters people from breaking in. But the spot where we keep the money overnight is easy to see during store hours, so anyone who wanted to rob us probably knows exactly where we keep the money at night.

vote-for5vote-against

There's been a few.
As the IT cum PC guy, I had a tool/ software "man" bag. I was searched every time, in and out, and I needed the ID keycard, but no big deal. Stuff still went missing. Like our old 14" monitor, used just to check servers, that finally died. Everybody knew it was dead. Well, we had the "invisible" people. Sub sub contract cleaning ESL crew in coveralls, pushing big blue dumpers all over the place- who had a master keycard to use the back door. None of us had a keycard that would operate that door, we had to pass security both ways. These guys just walked in and out.
I just walked off of one. New relatives- I mean management- made up silly rules. Not more than 5 music CDs. Always wear your ID on campus, never off; local foodie biz would give us discounts, and this was thought to be an unfair untaxed benefit. One jr would walk in and loudly pray for us- to remind us to stay honest. Girl Scout cookies and other sellings were also deemed to be an unfair untaxed benefit.

vote-for5vote-against

@gidgaf: WTF? Are you where spam emails come from? I don't even want to know what an "IT cum PC guy" is, or does.

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cont:
We never knew how cheaper burgers or charity snack selling was a security issue- but there they'd be. Another jr was a roaming straw boss, walking around with his walkie talkie checking on our positions, and monitoring our conversations in the break room. We didn't have walkies, so he wasn't talking to us. At one point they asked that our cell phones be left at the front desk. The same for USB sticks. They asked for our various online account IDs. They talked of bringing in vending machines, and keeping us from leaving for lunch. I was questioned- for security reasons- about any personal relationship with the woman I carpooled with.
BTW, these were imported German Mormons, and therefore we were soul less pagans, and agreements with us sometimes were more like "suggestions". Global warming, evolution and healthcare issues were considered to be "religious" in nature, and therefore verboten topics.

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@eraten: cum That's Latin. Kinda means and also, or along with.
Out of a crew of maybe a dozen, there were only two of us IT guys you could consider screw driver literate.
I was one of them.
Another half dozen of these guys I believe got into IT work because keyboards aren't sharp.
Our masters came from a middle management retail background, and they were very proud that they didn't have to know what they were talking about to tell us anything.
So, if someone printed to a printer that she didn't have permissions for, and it didn't work, they'd call me because a printer problem is a hardware problem. %-}
I very quickly learned to not argue, and take those hour jobs as a gift. ;;;+}

vote-for10vote-against

@gidgaf: To be fair, many large corps have prohibited Girl Scout cookie sales via company resources in the interest of staying the hell out of it. I'm sure it all started when someone complained they couldn't pitch their "Hampered Chef", "Garbage jewelry" or other MLM schemes, pointing to the scout sales as precedent.

j5 j5
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Our security guard on the afternoon shift is this like 90-year-old lady who wears too much makeup. She's had that post for at least five years (as long as I've been here), so she's only getting older. Considering there is a bank and ATM on the ground floor... and the building is located downtown... across from the courthouse... a block away from the prison... from which people come to the branch to make bail, pay their court costs, whatever... yes, I absolutely feel completely safe here.

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@j5: yep. My company even sent out an email this week about "lost hours" due to gambling on the Super Bowl.

vote-for6vote-against

@smallbigtall: We had metal detectors at both entrances to City Hall for a couple of years after 9/11. When they took them down a bunch of people freaked out. I told them:
1.Do you really think our old, fat, slow moving security guards would be a match for the least threatening terrorist ever born? All the metal detectors will do is ensure they die before we do.
2. Anyone with an ounce of brains can beat the things. To demonstrate, at Thanksgiving I smuggled an enormous carving knife through the metal detectors between the foil container and the foil wrapping of the luncheon turkey. It was very useful for carving the turkey. I told them anyone wanting to blow up the building could just conceal 20lbs of C4 in a metal planter with a plant on top and deliver it to anyone in the building.
3. I cannot think of a single reason why terrorists would want to blow up our City Hall.

Ironically, in the end, it's not some terrorist planning to blow up City Hall. It's City Council.

vote-for5vote-against

We have electonic keypads on the doors leading to the breakroom, training room, offices, and lockers in our building. They all have the same 5 digit code, and it has never been changed in the whole time I have worked there. So, anyone who has ever worked in the store in the last decade can access the "secure" areas. Rough estimate, about 5,000 people. They've changed the keys on the baler three times in the same time period. The horror if some underage got hold of a key and ran the baler!

vote-for5vote-against

I used to work at a crazy high security datacenter/colocation.

In order to get into the server room I had to
1. Show ID to get into the Mantrap/Airlock (which by the way has "bullet resistant walls")
2. Inside the "Mantrap" there was a palm biometric scanner that I had to type in a 9 digit code and have my fingerprints and palm checked with lasers (to make sure it was my hand), capacitance/resistance ("to make sure it is a real hand"), thermometers ("to make sure it wasn't a severed hand")
3. After the palm scanner verified me I had to unlock the door with a "Multi-T" key
4. Once inside the Co-lo i had to double unlock the cage with 2 Medco keys (Think security deposit box)

If you wanted to bring your Cellphone/Ipod into work you had to get a numbered bit of tamper resistant evidence tape over the camera lens that you then had to get checked/removed at the end of each day.

I am so glad I don't work there anymore. The only good think about that place was the stress based weight loss

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Ahh forgot... I worked inside the uber secure data center... so after I arrived to work it took ~30minutes to get to my desk.

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@spacezorro: I was actually thinking, "I hope the time clock was on the outside of the cage and not the inside".

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In my building you have to have a key card to get in. Once inside, the door to downstairs has a card reader. But you can take the elevator without using a card. Safety at its finest.

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My computer needed a special USB dongle that generates a special text string as a secondary password. A few weeks into this, I forgot my dongle. So I was worried that I wouldnt be able to access my company email and directories. A coworker told me to just type 1 at the text field and auto fill punched in the previous USB entered code. The code that's supposed to be uniquely generated each time. And it worked. Turns out hes been doing this the second day they issued the dongles.

So the codes are newly generated each time... It's just that every previously generated code are also accepted by the system.