questionsanyone have experience with (built-in) whole…

vote-for11vote-against
vote-for1vote-against

I'll follow your answers...interested in this for my house also. Thanks for asking!

vote-for2vote-against

My husband has done HVAC work for 20+ years but doesn't have a lot of experience with humidifiers because of where we live...the humidity averages 50% year round. He did say definitely do not put the unit on the cold air side as the humidity will draw across the components and cause rust. He also said bypass is currently more popular. I hope that helps a little!

vote-for1vote-against

@ohcheri: Thanks for the response. If I understand correctly, I can install the bypass in the return duct, where it will add humidity and then deposit it into the supply plenum, which should still keep the moisture from going directly through the furnace/AC coils. Could you run that by your husband and see if I'm missing something? Like I said, I'm really limited as far as the supply plenum goes - two sides are inaccessible (back and side of the utility closet), the other side only has about 3 inches of space between it and the return duct, and the front is blocked by the exhaust chimney stack and gas lines. Bleah!

Thanks!

vote-for2vote-against

@tsfisch: Hubby says, sorry, he has exhausted his knowledge of this already. If you do a search on Yelp.com for HVAC companies in your area you may find a friendly local contractor willing to answer questions on the phone. Good luck!

vote-for2vote-against

My HVAC guy (who I know socially and trust) has told me the inline units are largely for psychological effect only. They usually can't put enough moisture into the air to make a real difference... Said conversation occurred because we have a Honeywell unit that came with the house, and I asked him why when I set it to 40% humidity in the winter it just ran non-stop...

vote-for1vote-against

@kcjones99: What do they suggest then? These units supposedly can put 6-8 gallons a day in the air - that's not something I'm really looking forward to hauling across the house and filling up a huge "portable" unit. Not to mention we really don't have the space for a huge "portable" unit, nor do I like how noisy they tend to be.

The only other solution I've ever heard is "just use a small unit in the space you care about". Well, in my case, I want to keep a decent humidity level for our new piano. The piano is in the "great room" on the main level, which is open to about 3/4 the upper level (and we usually keep the bedroom doors open as well, so virtually the whole level).

vote-for1vote-against

@tsfisch: Regrettably, I can't claim to have pushed for an alternative. We don't have a piano or other needs-humidity thing. For us it's just a comfort factor...

vote-for1vote-against

Thanks. I'm also hoping that "something" is better than "nothing", which is what we do now.