questionsanyone have any tips for building a pc?

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Assuming you mean it's a dongle-style keyboard, as opposed to something that'd communicate to an on-motherboard bluetooth chip or such, you should be good.

As for other tips ... humidity and an anti-static wrist-band (which connects via a cable to ground).

Oh, also make sure you get your cooling paste well distributed. Have alcohol wipes ready to clean off the surfaces (both sides) so you can do it until you get it right. Don't force the processor or the RAM. Do force the heatsink (a little ... you kinda have to).

Think about airflow. Don't place things too close together.

Install dust filters. Make sure they're high-flow. Clean them regularly.

Plug in the PC Speaker. Set the temperature alarm to go off via it in the BIOS.

If you have problems, be calm. Eliminate possibilities one by one. That said, don't leave anything running the could do damage for any longer than needed.

I'm almost out of characters, but I reserve the right to supplement with more thoughts later.

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I don't have a clue about computer-building, but just wanted to say that I'm glad you are still around. I haven't seen your name here lately.

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Make sure your drives all have the power and data cables connected before powering up. I forgot to connect the power on one of my drives and it took me a while to figure out why it wasn't showing up in the BIOS. My office took delivery of a custom-built PC recently and the builder forgot to connect the power for the hard drive. This stuff happens.

It may be too late, but I recommend getting a modular power supply. It's nice not to have a bunch of unused cables cluttering the case. If you are installing additional fans, make sure they point the right way for airflow. There may be an indicator of airflow on the side of the fan. Don't overtighten the screws for the motherboard. Don't force anything to fit. Otherwise, follow the good advice given earlier in this thread.

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Read everything twice. Make sure you have another computer to Google anything if you run into an issue. Don't rush, take your time for this first build. I taught myself, been building custom pc's for 10 years now. It's really not that hard if you are mechanically inclined at all.

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@jsimsace: awwww, why thank you!

Thanks for the tips everyone. I just have a question, I plan on building it on a glass table (its the biggest one I have), would that be good or bad?

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@holymythos: Glass is an insulator, so it's safe from causing shorts. However, I'd be worried about static electricity build-up. Probably not a big problem, but it may be worthwhile covering the table with an anti-static mat if you have one available. At the very least, get yourself an anti-static wrist strap.

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Two big tips. First, be very careful and take your time installing the motherboard to the case/motherboard tray. Make absolutely certain that you haven't used the wrong screws and accidentially shorted out the board on the case. This will cause you to go nuts trying to figure out why the stupid thing won't turn on.

Second: If you are planning to use multiple drives (which I suggest, one small and fast for the OS, one gargantuan for your pr0n, ooop, I mean data) leave the non OS drive not plugged in (either power or data cable not connected) until after you have the OS installed and stable. It is just one less thing to worry about (this way you won't install the OS to the wrong drive. No, I haven't done it, but I've read from many people who have.)

EDIT:
Oh, and get ready to give a physical beat down to the first person who says "Why don't you just buy a Mac?"