questionsdoes anyone know how to help shin splints?

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i vaguely remember a physical therapist say something about it. she said to sit in a chair and put a weight (maybe 5 lbs?) on the end of your foot. then, keeping your heel on the floor, lift the weight up with the end of your foot.

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I developed shin splints a few years ago and I just worked through the pain until I either got used to it, or they went away. I know they say that a lot of times shin splints are caused by improper running techniques and/or the wrong shoes. Unfortunately other than that I don't know of any ways to "cure" them. Maybe someone else will have some better advice.

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Heel walks (forward and backward) as a warmup before you start running are really helpful. When you get home, elevate your legs and ice your shins. Try to check out your running style and see what part of your feet you're striking with. A midfoot strike has been really beneficial for me. Take NSAIDS to reduce inflammation as well. Foam rolling your shins can really help as well. Painful but effective.

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My son was diagnosed with these this year. The therapist said to ice down the leg, 20 minutes at a time, up to 3 times per day. It's been 2 months and he is still not running.

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Thanks guys. This has been really helpful. I am going to try the icing and the heel exercises today and hope for the best since I have a half marathon tomorrow.

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SHOES SHOES SHOES.

I used to suffer from shin splints when I started running, and part of that is you're building up the appropriate muscles. But also for me, the shoes made a world of difference. It's expensive and I hate dropping the money, but I'd suggest going to a specialty running store. They have machines that measure your stride and weight distribution, and can get you shoes based on those factors that will both help your form and help prevent injuries/pain such as shin splints.

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@figgers3036: Yes! Some places have a specialist on staff who can watch you run on a treadmill or something and make recommendations. At a minimum, take your old shoes in to the store, and the employees can look at the wear patterns to make some notes about your stride and strike, and can steer you toward appropriate shoes.

In the meantime, ice and anything that strengthens your calves is good. Stand on the bottom stair of a stairway (or a small stool or something, as long as it's sturdy) with your heels hanging off the back (just the balls of your feet and toes actually on the step). LIft up on your tiptoes, pause, then lower down as far as you can, so that your heels are below the level of the step. Repeat. Good stretch and strength move.

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@mstislavski: Are you serious? You have a half marathon to run and shin-splints. You're going to wind up with a stress fracture. For reals. Stress fractures are the exact opposite of awesome.

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Spend your money on really good running shoes and replace them after 400-500 miles even if they don't look worn. They are. Good running shoes will cost you $100+ but are worth it.

If icing doesn't help you have to rest and not run. Try aquajogging, cycling or something like that to maintain fitness but not stress your shins.

If you have shin splints, you might reconsider the half marathon. You are going to be in some serious discomfort.

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I always rotate my ankles around for about 30-60 seconds through out the day. That seems to do it for me. It helps to do that before running also.

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If you decide to go through with the half marathon tomorrow, please at least adjust your expectations. Don't push yourself to run the whole thing if your shins are telling you they can't take it. You can do serious damage. There is no shame in walking.

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Ice and stretching always used to work for me.

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You didn't say exactly what your symptoms are, and if you are male or female. I always have to be sure that my patients doesn't have a tibial stress fracture before diagnosing shin splints (tibial periosteitis). You can work through the latter, but the former needs near complete rest for about 6 weeks.