questionshow can i secure on an exit door with a window?

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I just want to make sure that I am understanding this correctly: It is a sliding glass door? I was going to suggest a metal screen door, but those are expensive.

If you want a cheap solution, you can get a window security laminate. If someone breaks the glass, it basically holds it together so there is no permeable layer for which a person can reach inside. It is completely clear, so you can enjoy the light from the window and rest assured that your home is pretty safe. You may need a professional to install it, and obviously if someone tries to break in, you will need to replace both the glass and the film.

I heard about these a few years ago on a tv show about home security:

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@curtisuxor: Sorry I didn't make it clear. It's a wood door with paned windows on the top half so the deadbolt is right there for anyone to get to if they really wanted to get in. The laminate looks very interesting but it might be cost prohibitive. But it's an option I didn't know about. Thanks.

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Sounds exactly like my door to the garage. Mine has a deadbolt that has to be locked with a key, so breaking a window wouldn't work. As the previous owners of my house found out, the thieve's answer was to just break the door!

The obvious (but expensive) answer is to replace the door/frame with a metal security door. Short of that, you could add a sliding bolt near the bottom of the door.

The simplest, and often most inexpensive answer is to add a small external security camera over the door. You don't even have to hook it up to anything, since it's presence will deter most would-be-thieves. I like this cheap one because of the LED light.

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@adadavis: You guys are over thinking things. I think I mentioned I was looking at the Door Club which is not going to break the bank and easy to install. I'm looking for something along those lines that I may not be aware of.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Club-20CA-Door/dp/B000L9T718/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358023953&sr=8-1&keywords=door+club

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This flip over door lock is a an excellent secondary lock.

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I've used a double keyed dead-bolt, which uses a key on both sides. You end up needing to have a key to open from the inside, but breaking the window doesn't allow as simple of an entry. We had on basement door that we didn't use frequently, and know neighbor has same type on their garage. Perhaps this and the flip over commented earlier would provide piece of mind you are looking for?

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How much modification can you make? Sometimes renters can't put any holes in the wall, for example, while homeowners can do whatever they want within the constrains of their budget. My neighbors have a "crossbar" installed on a walkout basement door; it looks like with the braces screwed into the studs on either side of the door. They wanted to make sure that the door could still be used as an emergency exit in case of fire trapping someone in the basement, but it would be really hard to force the door in from the outside. A different friend uses this to secure the door to her apartment. Depending on the distance between the window and the doorknob, a motivated burglar could probably use a tool to dislodge it, but it's remarkably solid and about $20. Could you install a second deadbolt towards the ground?

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@jsimsace: I think I've seen these before. This is a good option, thanks

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@scloherty: There is one there now but it didn't pass inspection. If I have to get out the back fast I'm screwed.

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@neuropsychosocial: I'm going to own the place so I can do what I want. For now I want something inexpensive but secure until I can figure out something long term If I'm going to put up a bar like you show, I may as well just board up the windows which I like better.

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@minkeygirl7: I know you want an inexpensive solution that you can implement yourself; I'm not sure what price range you're thinking of, and everyone has a different range of what they feel comfortable doing and have the tools to do. If you're comfortable replacing the door yourself, see if you have a local Habitat Restore. They usually have a large selection of doors for under $30/door and you might be able to find one that's solid and the right size, especially if your place has standard-sized doors.

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@jsimsace: Thanks a lot! I just bought one on Amazon for $3.00 using Prime. I also have one of these which may be overkill but until I figure something permanent out this will be good. http://www.amazon.com/National-Hardware-V804-Security-Nickel/dp/B001RUEWUQ/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1358030199&sr=8-6&keywords=door+flip+lock

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They sell metal, decorative screen-type panels in various designs, that you can put up over the window. I use one on my screen door to keep the pets from bursting through the screen.

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I agree with the metal mesh to cover the window from the inside. It can be attached with wood screws and washers. Any home store or hardware store will have it and will not cost a lot.

Sample:

http://www.sunny-wiremesh.com/Stainless-Steel-Crimped-Wire-Mesh.html

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How about a double-lock deadbolt? That's what we did.
http://www.amazon.com/Master-Lock-DSO0703-Cylinder-Deadbolt/dp/B000WS1IJW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358035247&sr=8-1&keywords=double+lock+deadbolt

It requires a key to open or close it. We keep spare copies stashed inside, incase of emergency - and make sure anyone sleeping here knows where they are. You can break the glass in the doors, but you aren't getting into our house that way.

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@minkeygirl7: I'm kind of scratching my head on this one.

A double sided dead bolt is the industry standard in these kind of situations. If you are really concerned about keeping somebody out when there is glass on the door that is what locksmiths/security consultants recommend. If you are worried about getting out, keep it open when you are home. Pretty much any other solution we are talking about will have the same problem: slows you down on the way out.

When I moved in I replaced all of the single sided deadbolts on 3 doors (glass the lot) with double sided deadbolts. I'm much happier with the situation: I keep the one in the bedroom open when I'm home.

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@wilfbrim: exactly. During the day, when we're home - the simple doorknob lock does the trick. At night, we lock them all. If you panic and can't get to the key - go out a window.

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There are more problems with the double-locking deadbolt than you think, besides being a safety hazard.

Insurance companies will have you remove them for this reason. Then when the local fire dept. does any kind of inspection, they will not grant a certificate of occupancy until it is removed. I live in Ct. and have been a home contractor for over 25 years.

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@thumperchick: as I stated earlier, a double lock deadbolt is dangerous and does not pass code where I live. The one that is there now is being removed which is why I need something else.

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@tcayer: Another good idea. I just need to block the glass so someone can't break it and get their hand through to open the deadbolt.

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@computiac: exactly. I just had an inspection and in CA they have to be replaced by the seller.

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@curtisuxor: You have made my day. I've been looking for something EXACTLY like security laminates for my house for the past three years. My main entrance door is a sliding glass paned door. I'm already looking into getting it installed. Thanks!

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@computiac: my insurance company lowered our rates when we put ours in. I guess everywhere is different.

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@thumperchick: If the killer is breaking in the front door, and you are running to the back door, But Oh where are my keys, you're dead. That's why they aren't good.

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@curtisuxor: That is a great product!

@minkeygirl7: But the killer isn't getting in the front door, that's the point. And we use the keys, every day, from the same spot. It's muscle memory. I understand why people are afraid, though.

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@thumperchick:

Everything changes when you are in panic mode !

The only thing the brain thinks about is escape.

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@computiac: I disagree. You lose when you allow yourself to panic.

In this case, a few pratice runs under stress e.g. timed runs, darkened room, loud music and someone chasing you, will end the panic and allow you to react in a preplanned manner. THis is why they have fire drills, to prevent panic and hysteria.

The point about building codes I understand, but building codes are made by politicians, who obviously have no idea how to make a home safe. THe building code in my state had lots of business representatives on the panel. Homes now have to have things in them that don't make them safer, ask any contractor.

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@ecriscit:
The point about building codes I understand, but building codes are made by politicians, who obviously have no idea how to make a home safe. THe building code in my state had lots of business representatives on the panel. Homes now have to have things in them that don't make them safer,

"ask any contractor".

I am a contractor in Ct.

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@thumperchick: All the double-sided deadbolts in the world won't keep fire out of your house. :)

It's generally impossible to know how one will react in face of life-threatening danger and drills don't really help. In particular, everyone who is discussing the muscle memory of locating the key is assuming that they'll be cognitively fine when the emergency hits. Just a few minutes around CO significantly diminishes processing speed and judgment; one may not be one's best self after waking up in the middle of a fire in the middle of the night.

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@minkeygirl7: @retorak: @thumperchick:

In case you plan on using the laminates, be forewarned that in an emergency you won't be able to break through these from the inside as well.

The laminates are also not entirely burgle-proof. They will slow the intruder down rather than be able to completely stop them. It will definitely surprise the hell out of them as an easy break and enter will now require a few minutes of brute force or a drill/cutting tool.

Most of the time, security laminates are combined with another form of protection. It can be a set of bars on the windows/doors, a few dogs in the home or an alarm system. The extra time it takes to get through the window (for this reason, more than one window should have the laminate) while a siren blares will deter most thieves from trying to get in, knowing they only have a few minutes under ideal circumstances.

Good luck and I'm glad my suggestion did not fall on "deaf ears"? or rather "blind eyes"? You know what I mean.

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@computiac: Not necessarily. When I was about 12 our house burned down. My mom, sister, and I all made it out of a completely smoke filled house from the second floor by walking down two flights of stairs and out the back door. Nobody panicked even though we couldn't see a thing and had to walk all that way through smoke. I even crawled on the floor just like I'd been taught. Protip: this is not effective on stairs and you will suck copious amounts of smoke.

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@computiac: not sure what you mean, are you saying that the building codes make homes safer or that you dislike the double key type deadbolt.

THe building codes in my state allow contractors to use celotex for walls. I could use a utility knife to cut a hole into someones home.

the nimrods in the capital do whatever the most cash says to do. The building code was initially a good idea, as there were plenty of guys with a pickup truck, a ladder, and a sign that said Jim's contracting riding around doing crappy work. THe problem began when the government got involved.

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@neuropsychosocial: No lock would prevent a fire...

I'll say this again, I understand that some people are afraid of these locks. I don't think those people are silly or anything. I simply missed the sentence in the OP where she said she didn't like/couldn't use a double lock.

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@thumperchick: I was attempting to tease you because someone said that double-sided deadbolts would make it harder to leave the house and you replied that double-sided deadbolts would prevent the intruder from entering the house, implying that preventing an intruder would eliminate the need to leave the house in an emergency.

@ecriscit: I actually removed a sentence from my post about military/law enforcement drills versus the typical drills that are available to civilians! "Exposure drills" are quite effective, but most people aren't able to drill how they would react when experiencing CO/smoke poisoning in their own home in the wide variety of possible scenarios.

My core point, which I think is important, that most people are poor predictors of their own behavior. The reason why that matters is that self-awareness allows preparation that overconfidence might deem unnecessary.

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I don't know if it will solve your double-key deadbolt problem, but this is my solution. My home was burglarized three years in a row so I beefed up security. However, I have very old wiring and an old fashioned in the floor gas furnace, so fire is a serious concern. I put in double key deadbolt locks in the doors with windows, but on the back door which would serve as an emergency fire exit, I have a key to the lock hanging on a hook at ankle height. Easily found in case of a fire, but way out of reach from the window. Likewise I keep the key to the exit door in my bedroom in the jewelry box right next to it. The front door has a double key deadbolt, but when I am at home and awake, the house keys are in that lock. My bedroom is a "safe room" and had a double key deadbolt on the solid wood door, and when I am in bed the keys are in that door. 100% of the time, no exceptions. But every room including the bathroom has a big enough window to climb out of, even for my Great Dane

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@moondrake: As i previously stated, it violates code to have a double key deadbolt where I live. I am going to get security film but until then I am going to use the little flip plate someone suggested a few days ago.

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I would recommend using blind bolts. Because then the intruder won't see them and think he can get in, but it won't work! I'm sure it would work ;) http://www.abrafast.com/http/www.abrafast.com/blindbolts.aspx