questionsdid you know high quality cameras put serial…

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There's a lot of other interesting stuff in the EXIF data. Unfortunately there are plenty of ways to get rid of it. Glad that guy got his camera back though.

I'm trying to find a story I remember reading years ago, probably in the early 2000s, about a dead pixel on a digital camera being used in a copyright case. A photographer had his work stolen by a colleague, but was able to prove that he pictures were his due to his camera having a dead pixel in the exact same spot on several images that were stolen. Technology is fascinating!

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I love happy endings like this one!

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big brother can track you AND your pictures

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I am very aware of the extensive EXIF data. Anyone doing much photo work looks at embedding watermarks and including copyright data in the header.

You can read more at Wikipedia -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exchangeable_image_file_format

And get a differnt dump of the data at http://regex.info/exif.cgi

What intrigued me about this post was the web search that "stolencamerafinder" does.
I have several decent cameras, with a number of online images. I was surprised when it turned up matching images immediately. The only problem? Somebody forged the serial number. My camera, but somebody else's image comes up as a match. Now I am curious. ;)

More EXIF info:
digital-photography-school.com/using-exif-data

And another EXIF viewer/editor:
http://www.exifdataviewer.com/index.html