questionswhat size tv should i get for my bedroom?

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Measure from normal viewing spot to tv placement so that you can get a good idea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optimum_HDTV_viewing_distance

On the cheap 32" size go for 720p. If you want to try and stay with the curve shoot for 1080p. Most panel tvs sound will be crummy, but depending on size and acoustics of your bedroom you may be fine. If not you can always pick-up a small sound bar for under 100 that will do just fine.

Good Luck!

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@xarous: I don't mean sound has to be great, just that I don't want speakers that squeak and hum which I have now.

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I had a older 32" LCD which had nice front facing speakers that sounded quite good. It was a bit small(it had replaced a 32" 4x3 Sony tube TV) so I purchased a 37" Vizio, the size is better and it's quite clear and bright(1080p) but the speakers are only adequate. OK for a bedroom but I'd probably not want it for my main TV.
If it were me I wouldn't go any cheaper than a Vizio, TVs like Magnavox/Sylvania/Insignia tend to have a rather dim picture and the sound is even worse than my Vizio. JMO

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I have a 32" and it works fine for me. I bought a Sony.
I made use of the site https://www.decide.com/
If you know what tv or tv(s) you are looking for, you can be alerted as to when they go on sale. It will tell you if it's time for them to go on sale and whether to wait or buy based on some other factors too.(ie where the model is in manufacturing cycle) It' s a great tool.

If you aren't sure which brand/model you want, they connect to reviews on Amazon. You can look at their most popular in that size category and it may help you see the price points and different models and their ratings.
Of course, sooner or later Woot will have on show up !

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I would aim at 40"-42" since a larger TV allows for more space for the speakers even if the speakers are weak they will sound better. Optical audio out is another option that I like since it allows high quality sound to be delivered to a larger stereo system when the speakers on the TV are not enough. If space is a problem a sound bar with a sub woofer can substitute for a stereo system, just make sure the audio out connection from the TV is compatible with whatever external sound system You buy.

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@mybestuser1: My room isn't big enough for that size and I only have a 39" in my LR. 34" would have been perfect but I think 32" is too small.

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@ceagee: Thanks for link, I"ll check it out. The problem is I'm not sure how long the current TV is going to last.

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@jjeff: I may have to get less than a Vizio since I blew my wad on my Toshiba. But size is the issue. What are your thoughts on a refurb?

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A LCD TV is prone to bad pixels and refurbished TV's don't always have the same warranty against minor defects that a new TV does. The best solution is Costco or a similar place where if you are unhappy with your TV you can return it with very little cause within a certain time period. PS VIZIO is worth it.

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@mybestuser1: Wasn't sure about refurbs since Woot seems to have a lot. Whatever I get has to be online with a good return shipping policy should problems arise. I know Vizio may be worth it but just not sure about the budget. Still paying for the Toshiba I got in January.

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Bedroom TV size depends a whole lot on your use. My husband & I use the TV in our bedroom to put on a movie before bed, but we never watch more than 5-10 mins, so having a 32" LCD is fine. We watch, take our glasses off & then pass out (or whatever ;) If you like to actually watch something for a while, it'll definitely depend on how far away you are, but if you have decent eye sight, even a 32" just might work.

As for refurbs, whether purchasing from Woot/somewhere else, the biggest thing to pay attention to is the warranty. I have a friend who bought a Woot refurb TV w/a warranty through some random place we've never heard of. He got a dud & had a HELLUVA time dealing with it. By the end, he basically lost $150 and had nothing to show for it. Depending on what Woot (or some other merchant) is offering on warranties, I would definitely check if you can get a SquareTrade warranty. That being said, I've always had GREAT luck w/refurb'd everything, and tend to prefer buying them. YMMV:)

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Also, we have an Emerson 32" LCD (Walmart Black Friday, new), a 40" Vizio LCD(I think - could be LED?) (purchased lightly used from a friend) and a 50" Toshiba LED (another Walmart Black Friday purchase, new) and we're happy with all 3. Those who really focus on super fancy HD visuals may notice a difference, but they all pretty much look the same to us, other than the size. Honestly, to us 'normal folk', the Emerson is just as good as the rest. Doesn't seem darker, doesn't seem lighter, doesn't seem worse or better. But if you're picky, then go with what the people tell you about brand. Or, if you're budget conscious, know that the Emerson (and similar brands) are probably "fine", if not "just great".

This is totally from someone who obviously doesn't care about brand and doesn't compare TV to TV. In my experience, the tiny, small, medium and large brands all have crappy products, so read the reviews online all over the place of whatever you're thinking of buying. Always.

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I have a 32" sony LCD in my room. size wise, the screen itself, top to bottom, is nearly the same as the old sony 24"(4:3 SD tube) it replaced.
what size is the old tube you are replacing?

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@earlyre: It's a 20" tube which is really fine for me. I'm not sure how that translates to a flat screen. Also I know that if you have an HD TV but no HD input then the picture is smaller than the screen so what would be a 32" screen actually has a much smaller picture. But I don't want a giant screen in my bedroom so I have to think about it. Just need to find one before my current TV craps out, with either the picture going or the sound.

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well i had a 19 inch for my bedroom for a while and thought it was too small so i passed it on to my step daughter and replaced it for a 32 and was surprised how big it looked in my bedroom. it might be smart to get some dimensions of a 32,inch wide screen and use a peice of card board to compare in you room its hard to compare when you have 32s sitting next to 40s and 60 inch screens. for 2 years thevtv half hung off the side of my dresser. currently i have moved for no tv in the bedroom and only sleeping in there with my tablet to read a book before bed

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@minkeygirl7: Here are some measurements that may help you (all numbers are approximate):

A 32" diagonal widescreen is 28" wide by 16" tall. The SD (non-HD) image on that screen would be 21" wide by 16" tall, which is 26" diagonal. Your 20" diagonal tube is 16" wide by 12" tall, so the SD image on a 32" will be far larger than the 20" tube you're replacing.

There's no significant difference between a 32" and a 34" screen...if they were sitting next to each other you could see the slight difference (the 34" is 1" taller and 1.7" wider), but in actual use you're not going to notice the difference.

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32" seems fine, but be sure to get 1080, 720 will omit some broadcast channels on setup because some are 1080 (yes, I use an antenna or bluray player - cable is too rich for my blood).

I would not ever put a TV in my bedroom, since it's mostly for sleeping. So I spent my TV Budget on a 60" Quatro with Denon receiver and 5 rather large speakers (Dolby 5.1), but not in the bedroom.

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@lexian: You read my mind. I'm going to make a cutout and see how that works.

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@thomaswbowman: '32" seems fine, but be sure to get 1080, 720 will omit some broadcast channels on setup because some are 1080'

This is not correct. There are two primary broadcast (called ATSC) resolutions in the US, 720p and 1080i. All TVs with an ATSC tuner are required to receive and display both 720p and 1080i signals. A 720p TV shrinks a 1920x1080i signal to fit the screen's native resolution (usually 1366x768). A 1080p TV stretches a 1280x720p signal to fit the screen's native resolution (1920x1080).

Manufacturers will either say their TV is 720p or 1080p. 1080p means that the screen's native resolution is 1920x1080 pixels, so it can display 1080i signals at full resolution, plus it can also display 1080p signals. 1080p is not a broadcast standard, so the device generating the 1080p signal needs to be directly connected to the TV. Blu-Ray players, set-top boxes (DVR, Roku, etc.), game consoles and computers are sources of 1080p.

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When watching moving video on a 32" screen, 720p and 1080p look the same. The difference starts to be noticeable at about 37", and becomes more obvious as the screens get larger. Still images are different, however, like if you're using the TV as a computer monitor. A computer's display looks terrible on a 32" 720p monitor...the pixels are huge, and it looks like something out of the Stone Age (circa 1990). You'll notice the difference in console games too. Even 24" computer monitors are 1080p (or higher) because 24" is already too large for 720p as a computer display.

Bottom line: If you're just going to use the 32" as a TV, a 720p set is fine. If you're going to use it as a computer monitor or for console gaming, or if you think you might do so in the future, then get a 1080p.

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@cleverett: Thank just a tv in the bedroom. Don't need bells and whistles, just don't want speakers that squeak and hum.