questionsis blu-ray going to die soon?

vote-for14vote-against
vote-for6vote-against

gotta have a mass marketable option. most people (especially those with kids) won't give up the hard copy option (when kid wants to watch show again after you "accidentally" deleted it).

vote-for6vote-against

Meh. I don't own any yet....still just plain DVD here.

vote-for8vote-against

I highly doubt it. It seems like more and more people are adopting it, and the discs only recently have gotten down to the below-$10 range for many movies where people can actually afford to collect them.

vote-for4vote-against

I have several Blu-ray movies. It's the only way to get 3D movies to work right. If you get a 3D movie on DVD, they require the blue/red glasses versus the active shutter type.

Blu-ray is also a great way to store lots of data. The lower capacity disks can hold around 25 gigs whereas the DVD's can old around 5 gigs. That's 5 times the storage space. Then you have the dual layer versions of each. Blu-ray at 50 Gigs and DVD at 9 Gigs.

vote-for10vote-against

Die? I didn't even know he was sick.

vote-for5vote-against

Not even close. As you may note from the ridiculously detailed sales information available at http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=181218&page=51&highlight=sales, Blu-ray is both gaining in market share and improving year-over-year sales.

Nothing comes close to the audio and video quality of Blu-ray. Add that to the fact that many people prefer actually owning a copy of what they buy (i.e. physical media opposed to digital) and you get a format that is in absolutely no danger of extinction anytime soon.

vote-for4vote-against

I don't think Blu-Ray will reach DVD levels of market saturation, but no, it's not going anywhere. I don't buy nearly as much film and television as I used to, but when I really like something, I buy the physical copy. Until I have a digital locker that has it all and no limitations (similar to my music collection), physical copies will rule supreme)

vote-for6vote-against

I'll bet this same question was asked about dvd's at a forum 12 years ago, in a post surrounded by viagra and SHOCK THE MONKEY AND WIN A PRIZE ads

vote-for1vote-against

Nope, not with the constant sub $10 titles and cheap players.

vote-for2vote-against

I give blu ray 2 years tops. The Internet and the ever improving data storage will make dvds obsolete including blu ray. The same way it killed cd's. It's inevitable in my opinion. The dramatic price drops on blu ray movies wouldn't happen if the stores thought they were going to be selling strong for 5 years. Contrary to popular belief stores are not around to give you a great deal, their sole objective is to sell things for as much as you will pay.

vote-for1vote-against

Why would I spend $20 on a blu ray movie when I can watch it on Amazon instant view for $2. 99 and if it's a film I love it can buy the digital copy for the same $15-20 as the blu ray And I don't have to worry about storing the 300+ dvd boxes of movies I had to have but only watch every couple years. I'll trade in my entertainment center from college that took up the whole wall for portable external hard drives and DVR's that will be so much easier to keep track

vote-for1vote-against

No way. Most downloaded movies still are not up to blu-ray quality, and most people do not have the super-fast internet connection or massive hard drive space required to have a library of high-def movies. Anyone who has an hd tv but doesn't want the highest quality video is wasting their money. Streaming is gaining popularity but once again unless one has a very fast internet connection streaming in blu-ray quality is not going to happen, and people still want to own copies of their favorite movies to watch more than once.

vote-for1vote-against

I think BluRay Disc tech has a couple of years, tops.
Finally, maybe, sometimes there's a $10 to $15 BD (old) movie? BFD!
What's the price (and size) of a blank always rewritable SD card?
The BD only works in BD hardware; the SD cards work almost everywhere.
Remember the Sony cameras with the floppy discs? Then the ones with the CDs? Make room on the museum shelf. The BDs are right behind them.
Tho I AM curious what will happen after the SD and SSDs.

Plus I can already keep my movies (with all my ripped CDs and record albums)in my server of three multi terabyte drives, and I can zap them by wireless router anywhere around the house.
The kid can always burn a copy if he really wants; he doesn't, tho.
We've got a small stack of no longer used CD and DVD players, I'm not going to buy BluRays just to add to the pile.