questionsdo you consider pasta shapes interchangeable?

vote-for58vote-against
vote-for15vote-against

in general, no. Some specific dishes require certain types of noodles, though. try making chicken noodle soup with lasagna or a lasagna with spaghetti.

vote-for3vote-against

I agree, it's all the same to me, unless a specific noodle is needed, like orzo those tiny things would not do well with spaghetti.

vote-for9vote-against

edit: some SIMILAR noodles are interchangeable for me, though. spaghetti, vermicelli, angel hair, & linguine are all interchangeable to me, and linguine in interchangeable with fettuccine for me as well.

vote-for4vote-against

When I make spaghetti sauce and tell the kids we are having spaghetti for dinner, they get really upset if I use anything but spaghetti noodles. To me it is all noodles and sauce (whether I use elbows, shells, or spaghetti), they say it is not the same.

vote-for3vote-against

Some times the difference is directly related to what's in the pantry.

Otherwise, I'm with kamikazeken

vote-for4vote-against

i dont like sphaghetti noodles much at all,I always use penne or rotini or farfalle, spaghetti is just annoying to eat,

I also really like Orzo in soups, and sometimes i go for random shapes like wacky-mac or campanngelli*? i dunno how to spell it but they are little trumpet things

vote-for9vote-against

Absolutely not interchangeable. They all hold sauce differently and have some variation in texture.

vote-for4vote-against

Generally no, though similar shapes are interchangeable, eg. linguini, (thin) spaghetti & vermicelli are pretty much interchangeable, as are rotini & rotelle, or ziti & penne.

As for goulash, I grew up eating it over boiled potatoes or wide egg noodles, so I wouldn't have a problem with using bowties.

Note however that "goulash" refers to many VERY different dishes, some of which have pasta or potatoes cooked in it. My father was from what is now Slovakia, so the Czech-style goulash I grew up with was cut up beef & onions, a bit of flour, beer, tomato paste & sauce, lots & lots of paprika & caraway seed, nothing else.) Hungarian style goulash is similar, without much tomato & has vegetables & potatoes or dumplings cooked in it.

American style goulash actually refers to three completely different dishes, one of which is basically Chef Boy-r-dee Beef-a-roni/Beef-a-ghetti (meat sauce with ground beef & pasta). In the South, goulash refers to a dish made from assorted leftovers.

vote-for7vote-against

I don't. I feel different depending on what kind it is.

Macaroni elbows: "This is going to become goulash, and I'll be eating it, microwaved out of a Tupperware within the next few days...mmmmmmm leftovers are great!"
Regular spaghetti: "You know your mother in law is going to keep judging you until you try making something a little more exotic."
Angel hair spaghetti: "I don know why, but this is always a little more satisfying that regular spaghetti."
Shells: "Why am I not always eating Mac & Cheese this way? Like seriously!"
Ziti: "Honey, please remind me not to use this caterer."
Languini: "I have got to find out how to make this white sauce, this Itallian restaurant always gets it right...though I know I'm gonna end up drinking too much of the house white and forget, as usual."
Dinosaurs: "Kraft, you help me relive the best parts of childhood!"

vote-for4vote-against

@dmaz: my mother calls me crazy for this but i swear on my life that kraft macaroni shapes are far superior to the regular kind

vote-for3vote-against

i feel that the main difference in pasta is the amount of product it is holding. penne vs the larger sized that basically is a difference in big around it is has a taste difference because the larger ones don't cook the same. also penne vs rotini cook the same, but hold sauces differently.

but in the end it boils down (sorry) to what is on hand (which is usually about 20-30 packages of different varieties)

vote-for3vote-against

Try good gnocchi, my favorite, for the extreme end of thick, deliciously soft dumpling-like awesomeness. Not many people have had it, but I greatly prefer it to angel hair, even with the same sauce.

I don't think it's just the texture, with this extreme thickness, you get alot of the taste of the noodle, which when fresh is really, really good.

vote-for4vote-against

@norimw: i totally agree, the shapes are way better, but there is less in the box, they have to use the money they save filling the box left for the secret ingredient.

which is most likely heroin

vote-for2vote-against

God, you heathens. Of course it matters. Even between angel hair and spaghetti, each noodle is distinct in its own way.

vote-for3vote-against

Coming from an Italian... Yes it matter!

Well at least that's what my grandma and mother would tell me.
You do NOT argue with Italian women. Which is why I will never marry one. No offense Italian female wooters!

vote-for3vote-against

Depends on how it's being used. In recipes no, but I like almost any pasta cooked and server with spaghetti sauce.

vote-for3vote-against

Different pastas have different surface area/volume ratios, so a thin pasta like angel hair will end up bringing a much higher ratio of sauce/pasta to your lips than, say, a wide, thick pasta like pappardelle. Similarly, a fusili, having three spiral edges, offers much more surface for sauce to cling to than, say, a ditalini.

To convince yourself there's a difference, just try making a particularly strong-flavored marinara with extra garlic and chili. Then serve it with one bowl of angel hair and one of fettuccine. You should easily tell the difference.

vote-for2vote-against

@dmaz: +1 for dinosaurs...because they hold the sauce better or some other valid reason.

vote-for2vote-against

@dmaz: Freakin' shells! I almost refuse to eat Mac' n Cheese anymore.

vote-for1vote-against

I use fusili because they hold onto a lot of sauce. I like orecchiette for the same reason. I prefer not to have long pastas like spaghetti, fettucine, linguine, as they tend to whip around and leave tracks on my clothes.