questionswhy do people say this like it means something?

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Seeing your instead of you're

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"Watch your head" when there's a chance you might bump your noggin climbing into or out of whatever.

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It's the same difference. If it is the same, it isn't different.

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"My dog is friendly" as their uncontrolled pooch runs up to my dog, who loves people but not other dogs.

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My organic chem professor was in his own words "really f'ing anal" about grammar on lab reports.

He also used to use the phrase "intensive purposes" constantly. Drove me crazy.

edit: really woot? the word filter doesn't apply to that word I just had to put an ' in myself?

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I forgot to add people who say "OF-TEN" when they mean to say often (t is silent people).. it drives me nuts

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@devexityspace: I just checked a couple of dictionary sources and it seems the word can be pronounced with and without the "t".

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I hate the new official pronounciation of the word harassment where all the emphasis is on the first syllable. It seems like they changed official pronounciation just so the increasing majority of retarded people who said it wrong could now be in the right.

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"not sound racist but...(insert something racist)."
I just want to say something clever like...
Not to point out the obvious but you sound like a racist.

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using "times" when it should be Multiply, or "plus/minus" when it should be add/subtract

Ex:
"Why don't you just times the two numbers?"
"I think you should plus 23 and 4, not minus them"

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"my bad"

I interpret that as a request to punch you in the face, and then say "oops, my bad!"

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@devexityspace: Heh, I'll drive you crazy then. I say the 't'.

My SIL says 'salmon' with the 'l' SAL-MON.

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@tsero4: Sounds like you don't like them verbized either. =P

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I hate when people say, "honestly" frequently in conversation. Are we suppose to not believe them if they don't say it?

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"it is what it is" used to get on my nerves till i finally accepted that it is what it is

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another one is "literally"
It's way over-used, literally.

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@dpn0121: I don't know why your so upset over that.

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Honestly, your off-ten, for all intensive purposes, literally, 10 times as likely to get bitten by any dog irregardless of how friendly I may say it is. So, my bad, I am literally telling you, “Heads up!” as I throw racial epithets you’re way. I can, since I am ethnic; not to be racist but to be factual.

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"watchu talkin bout willis?"
I hear that, like, literally/honestly everyday, you know.

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The phrase "Man up", especially when women use it. They don't seem to understand both the misogyny behind that phrase and the perpetuation of stereotypical gender roles for men--that we must all be grunting alpha-male-types that only drink beer, eat turkey legs and watch the movie 300 over and over.

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Nuclear.

It is not pronounced "noo-kyoo-lur".

>:(

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1)"It all goes back to" - I have a coworker that starts most conversations this way, then repeats the phrase every few sentences.

2)"I'll look into it and let you know" aka "I've heard your request and will flush it from my mind the second you leave my sight/hang up"

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EPIC (fill in)

EX: EPIC FAIL

not to mention the other fad catch phrases

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I drive a friend of mine crazy with sal-mon. I tend to pronounce words all sorts of ways as I unconsciously mimic others (moved a lot as a kid). So if he'd just let it go it would have passed. But he made a big deal of it, and now it's sal-mon for good. Not on purpose (much) but because he engraved it into my subconscious. And because now sammon sounds like kid-speak to me, like how a kid says sammich. I find people who are compelled to correct others in public to be much more annoying than those who made the mistake in the first place. Being right is not more important than being polite.

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@curtisuxor: And the misandry of the word either. :p But I agree with that, I hate hearing some woman say to "Man up" without defining what "Man" is supposed to be this week. ^_^ So I thank you for mentioning that.

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I know it's not important and I don't let it get in the way of my conversation with anyone, but I hate it when people say fer when what they mean is for. I've even heard newscasters (local and national) do it. I hear it so often, I caught myself doing it the other day; that was really irritating!

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At work, I am always asking customers if I can help them as they touch everything in the store, and they always say, "No, I'm just looking". It makes me crazy! There are 2 year olds that know better. I asked my boss if we could put up a sign that says "remember, we see with our eyes not our hands".

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@panthiest: I hate when someone is a stickler for grammar and then shows what an arse they are by saying things wrong. Wouldn't you have liked to say "not to be a (fill in the blank), but the phrase is "all intents and purposes"?

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At the end of the day.....

You've got to play the hand you're dealt.

It's all good.

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Not really the same thing but I really hate it when people call me "hoss." I am a tall guy who has been somewhat overweight most of my life. I don't know the origin of that name but strangers often call me that. I hate it.

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@gadgetgirl88: Well, depends on where you're working. I tend to go into stores for an item or two, know where they are, and then just wander to kill time or whatever. I touch clothing all the time, because if it doesn't feel like good quality or comfortable, why bother looking at it? I pick up food packages because I am on a restricted diet. I pick up electronics to see specs. Why shouldn't browsers be allowed to touch stuff? As long as it's not a buffet...

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@lisaviolet: Every time I trip over anything in my house, my wife always says "be careful." That is the most useless advice anyone has ever given me and I tell her that every time she says it.

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Just a small irk is, "I like this ALOT."
Instead of a lot.

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@caffeine_dude: Or confusing bigot with racist. Both are ugly things to be, but technically, different meanings.

I despise the use of awesome to describe mundane experiences. "Oh, the food there is awesome." "Don't you think the sofa looks awesome on that side of the room?" Truly? Moving a sofa across the room inspires you with awe?

Healthy/healthful/healthfully being used interchangeably.

I'm sure I will get slammed for this one, but it bothers me to read in comment sections of distressing news articles the phrase "Prayers going up," or simply "Prayers." Jeezy Pete, I've turned into a cranky piece of work.

And finally, "where are you at?" We here it frequently in the South.

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@benyust2: I wonder if it comes from Dan Blocker's character on "Bonanza?" Hoss Cartwright was a big, strapping man with a heart of gold. I learned at a young age one should never fall in love with a Cartwright man. It was as bad a beaming down nameless to a new planet while wearing a red Star Fleet tunic. It almost always meant certain death.

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My coworker says "and also too" while telling stories all the time. As in, "If we do our work this way, it will be easier. And also too, it will save us more time."

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@gadgetgirl88: I understand how you feel, but I am one of those people. If I don't like the way something feels, no matter what it is, I don't buy it.

What drives me nuts are people who can't put a whole sentence together when they talk. Ex. I was gonna

You were going to what???????

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I despise when people say "aks" instead of "ask" ! Come on people, sound it out with me, aaaask!

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@sbee619: I guess I should have mentioned I work in a hair store where we have signs posted everywhere saying please do not play with the hair. We try to be nice about how we say don't touch our hair, but clearly people, mostly men ( yes, men) cannot read, so sad. The problem is it gets all frizzy when they touch it. They will also play with it forever and make a mess of it and then ask if we have a good one. It's so irritating. Oh and yes I hate my job !!! Errr, sometimes, I'm working right now actually, oops. LOL

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Louie C.K. had a great one in his stand-up that I agree with. Saying "The N-Word". Not the actual word (well, that too), but the phrase, "The N-Word". Note that Mr. C.K. works "blue" so I apologize in advance if this offends some -- it was not intended.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dF1NUposXVQ

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@sbee619: I was thinking the same thing. I was curtain shopping yesterday and I handled every curtain in the store, the ones I liked a half dozen times, because I wanted to see what the fabric felt like, and I pulled them out so I could see what they looked like in the sunlight from the window rather than the fluorescent lights, and so I could judge their opacity against a lit window. I agree that "looking" isn't exactly the right word, but that is the commonly accepted vernacular for shopping without have yet made a choice. I did end up buying five curtain panels for the living room and I would have bought two more for the dining room, but after I finally decided on them they didn't have the color I wanted. I am going to a different store in that chain to look for those today.

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@houndlax: But I love this ALOT! http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html

I hate it when someone says, "Have a good one!" Have a good what, may I ask?

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@lavikinga: I actually toured the Cartwright Ranch (set of Bonanza) when I was 7-8. Thanks for the walk down memory lane (foggy as it is).

Back on topic:
I hate when people (as in me) use parentheses too often (like 4 times here, [so far]) in printed text (like a blog or comment). Actually, I am pretty sure it is my lack of knowledge of complex sentence structure. Reading real classic literature, or, better yet, early 20th century science or technical books makes one realize our lack of agility with the printed (let alone spoken) language.

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@staceroo: My standard answer to this is, "I already have a good one. I'm looking for a longer one."

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> "I will give you (insert 50% off asking price here).. cash in hand ready to go".

If your question was "why do people say this" rather than "do you have any phrases that annoy you?", the answer is pretty simple ...

People say this to show that, yes, they're offering less, but they're promising no drama with that. They can buy it right now (they won't ask you to hold it for them), they won't be dickering with you further (hopefully), they won't claim not to have enough money, they won't be trying to include a 2nd party post dated check (you may not take checks, but people will certainly try), etc.

There's a lot of drama involved with selling stuff on CL, so this a promise of less money but no drama might be totally worth it.

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@curtisuxor: Coming from a military background, when I hear "man up" I take it to mean one should get ready to roll out, something akin to gearing up to go.

Is this misogynistic? I'm female & have used the term in the past. I'm curious as to how it is considered belittling & hateful.