questionswho is your favorite painter?

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Being a sci-fi and fantasy reader and convention-goer, my favorites are all of that type artist. I also only like figurative work, either of very rich colors or of a limited palette. I have always liked Michael Whelan, he achieved fame painting book covers although he is moving out of illustration and into the gallery market. I have the good fortune of owning a Whelan original. For digital art with a painterly feel, I like Todd Lockwood. Many viewers do not realize they are looking at digitally created art when they view his works. I have an LE #1 of one of his works. I've met them both at cons and they are also both nice guys, which makes it easy to enjoy their work.

http://www.toddlockwood.com/galleries/

TBC

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A less commercial, more thought-provoking artist I like a lot is Alan M. Clark. He has a real knack for naming his pieces.
I Become My Resting Place
http://ifdpublishing.com/zencart2/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=3&products_id=72
Blasted Femurs, a Sack o' Religion
http://ifdpublishing.com/zencart2/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=3&products_id=46

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Right now, I'm really enjoying Pat Saunders-White. In particular, the barnyard animals make me wonderfully happy.

http://www.patsaunderswhite.com/large-multi-view/Barnyard%20Animals/2036212-7-169129/Barnyard%20Animals.html

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How about Mr. Number Paint By.

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@mamajamerson: Those are absolutely wonderful! I'm now looking for a blank wall space big enough for one of his works.

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@magic cave: That's my problem precisely! I have to find room for "Dairy Queen" and one of the llamas, at the very least.

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@mamajamerson: That style reminds me quite a lot of the art of George Rodrigue. I was quite taken with his Blue Dog paintings on my first visit to New Orleans and have liked them ever since.
http://www.georgerodrigue.com/originalbluedogpage/originalbluedogs.html
http://www.georgerodrigue.com/

"One particular Cajun legend, the loup-garou, became the inspiration for the first Blue Dog. Painted for a book of Cajun ghost stories (Bayou, Inkwell, 1984), Rodrigue chose a photo of his studio dog Tiffany who had died several years before as his prototype. Rodrigue painted this first eerie Blue Dog a scruffy, pale grey-blue, with red eyes.

Over time, the dog became a friendlier image that left the swamps and cemeteries of Louisiana to seek whatever adventure the artist imagines. "

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There's something about this guy that makes me really happy. Geography + geometry + colors = oh my.

http://www.ericlopresti.com/

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Kim Jones Nature and Modern art collide. Super large canvas' and the use of a lot of texture. Kinda hard to see in photo. You can click to see the pics enlarged and then if you go to the portfolio tab at the top and click it takes you to an on line gallery of more paintings.

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@moondrake: I can see the similarity in style. Very nice!

@ceagee: I like some of those as well. In particular - Crosby's Playground

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The guy who did the walls in my house. Mad skills. He's 6'9" and didn't even have to use stilts for the ceiling!

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I'm looking right now at a post card ("Yellow Dog at Sunset") from a work by Jon Whiddon, a folk artist from the Hiawassee, Georgia area who did some simply splendid work. I couldn't afford to buy his originals when I first saw them six or seven years ago, so I placated myself with a dozen postcards of his work. I recently tracked down his website, hoping now to be able to buy two or three, only to find he passed away, far too young, in 2008.

Fortunately, prints of his work are still available, and I'll be ordering the ones I most like tomorrow. If you go here http://jonwhiddon.com/#portfolio you can see how wonderfully talented he was; my favorites are the dog series http://jonwhiddon.com/#giclee-prints-animals-and-produce-signs beginning with #8.

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@mamajamerson: I have a very, very tiny house with very limited wall space, and over the years I've managed to fill nearly all the walls. It took me years to find a print of "Ruby Green Singing," http://www.google.com/search?q=ruby+green+singing&ie=UTF-8 after seeing it in a museum 25+ years ago. Mostly I have signed/numbered lithos, but when the work is well beyond my limited means I'm happy to obtain a print. I tease my husband about needing a bigger house just for the wall space!

And now I have to find space for Pat Saunder-White's Adelita the Blue Angora Goat somewhere!

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@moondrake: I love his Blue Dog! I've seen several of the variants over the years but didn't know the origin of the image.

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Goya, Dali, and I quite like the renaissance painters. Totally incongruent, I know.

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My favorite artist is Caravaggio. Sculptor & artist, Michelangelo, is a close 2nd. Have been so fortunate. Have seen many works of both of these artists works in person. I am humbled by that. (Caravaggio in the Nelson Gallery in Kansas City, in Rome & Florence. Michelangelo - the Sistine Chapel, & in Florence.)

Also, own many unknown artists oils, sculptures & other works of art. Some of these are my personal favorites. At times I think it's because I own them & I know they are originals. Sometimes, it's because I find them beautiful and/or so very unique. A favorite: A very large oil of a horse. A red horse, that is skeletal & yet his heart is there. Odd? Yes. I love it! Other fave oils; 6 that I brought back from Spain. 5 depicting 'festival', same artist. The other, a gorgeous 1 showing the gardens at Alhambra.

Am a collector, of sorts. Also own a few of Peter Max's older signed, numbered lithos, and many, many of his signed posters.

Am a complete, total fool for art. ;-)

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I'm a fan of the works of Robert Watson. His paintings are desolate and dystopian. They typically feature a solitary figure in the foreground. Here's an example:

Robert Watson painted a cover for one of the editions of The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury. That was how I first heard of him and his artwork. I currently have one of his paintings in my home and it's one of my favorite purchases.

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My kids. I still have some of their earliest works (1998) on my wall. Before 1998 it was too raw for my taste.

No one else said 'their kids'? I am telling!

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@magic cave: I've now added Jon Whiddon to my list. The rooster ones, in particular, make me feel all warm & happy. Thank you for sharing!

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It's kind of low-brow, but I have recently discovered that I like John Atkinson Grimshaw, particularly "Figure in the Moonlight". How did I come across him? Well, Woot of course. (The Museum Art Woot Plus from a week or so ago). I enjoy his dark and shadowy style. Now I find he can be purchased at my local big box store - who knew?

I looked at the Kim Jones link posted earlier, and wow, she's good. Did you see "empress of forgiveness"? Wow, I would love to have that.

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Monet for me. Always loved Impressionism. And for a more modern twist on it, I enjoy the works of Val Sewell.

http://www.valsewell.com/

I guess I have a special place in my heart for her stuff because we discovered her while on our honeymoon in Vancouver many years ago. Her works might appear kind of simplistic, but they just make me happy.

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@gmwhit: I had the good fortune of spending 3rd and 4th grade school years living in Chicago, back in the days when taking school classes to museums was a regular occurrence. We'd go to the Chicago Art Institute quite often, and I got to see some legendary works of art in person. I remember being very taken with Auguste Rodin's The Thinker. The mass and power of it drew me like a moth to a flame, and my teacher was clearly uncomfortable with the nudity and kept trying to make me move on with the class. But I just wanted to stand there and absorb it. I attribute my continuing love of sculpture to that piece. I've also always been a great fan of Michelangelo's sculpture, and I think Da Vinci may be the smartest man who ever lived.

@caffeine_dude: The only piece of lasting art my "kid" ever gave me was a paw print in the freshly poured concrete I was smoothing. He saw me pawing at it and mimicked my motion.

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A big Roy Lichtenstein fan myself. No idea why. Just fascinating scenes/stories he seems to paint.

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@dogbountyhunter1: Have you had a chance to visit the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg? http://thedali.org/home.php It's absolutely splendid!

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My favorite painter is Oneta, but I am biased because I have been friends with her son and daughter since high school.

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@hossdawg97: Those are quite lovely. I can see why you'd be a fan.

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I'm enjoying this thread, thanks for posting it!

My favorite is Tamara De Lempicka: http://www.delempicka.org/ . I have a huge framed print of La Dormeuse on the largest wall of my living room.

Not traditional art, but I also love Michelle Allen clocks and have about 10 of them now: http://www.allendesignsstudio.com

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@mamajamerson: Great Scotts where are the penguin pictures in this "style"?!

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@darkinc: Penguins would be interesting. I'd also like to see an emu. Maybe the artist needs to do a whole bird series?

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@mamajamerson: Penguins, Emu's, Llama's oh my!

I have a bit of a thing for none traditional birds...

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Like @pitamuffin, have always loved Monet and while in Chicago, would play hooky to visit his works at the Art Institute when I needed cheering up. But since I saw this painting in person and realized it's the only artwork I ever thought about trying to make heist film about, John Singer Sargent has become my answer.