questionsanyone going to participate in "bank transfer day"

vote-for37vote-against
vote-for13vote-against

Dropped Wells Fargo, went back to 100% of our primary bank which doesn't suck.

vote-for3vote-against

@atomicorange: hah, I actually just got off the phone with Wells Fargo (unrelated to banking; it was work stuff).

vote-for7vote-against

i left Wells Fargo also around 3 months ago i have always had my credit union acct. now i do 100% of my banking with just them

vote-for11vote-against

My wife and I have had such bad experiences with incompetence and/or lies by the national banks we've been with over the last year or so. We started with US Bank and within a period of 2 months they made three major errors on the account - so we closed with them and went to Wells Fargo. The guy who set us up with our accounts at WF told us he was giving us one type of account and then ended up setting us into a different one with much lower interest rates. Then WF announced the debit card and other fees.

We just called it, done with the big banks. Not a credit union member at the time, but maybe eventually. But for now we'll stick with the bank we have (who is awesome).

vote-for13vote-against

I'm slowly migrating away from Bank of America (switching autopay bills and such). Soon the last step will be changing my direct deposit.

Not participating in "bank transfer day," too many random things to take care of first, but hoping to be big bank free within the month.

vote-for6vote-against

I did this a couple of years ago after having my wallet stolen from the counter inside a Wells Fargo. They refused to pull the security footage because it was "off site" and said they would get back with me to let me know what they found...they never did.

vote-for11vote-against

When BofA first announced that fee (that backfired so badly), Chase sent me a letter, assuring me that they would never charge those fees to certain customers. It had the opposite effect that they expected, I'm sure. It didn't make me feel flattered. It made me feel guilty. Knowing that there were people out there, living paycheck to paycheck, and being hammered with fees by bankers who were the ROOT cause of all the financial turmoil going on in the world today, just made me sad.

Then I realized that there was something I could do about it. I've refinanced my home with a local credit union, opened up checking and savings with that same place, and starting moving direct deposit things over to it. I expect to be moved entirely by February or March. I've encouraged other friends who are also financially comfortable to do the same.

The slight inconvenience is worth the satisfaction. I won't make Guy Fawkes Day, though.

vote-for8vote-against

I have banked with Wells Fargo, US Bank, B of A, and Chase; all TERRIBLE experiences, I just feel like they are out to suck the blood out of me.

About a year ago we switched to a local Credit Union, and man, what a difference; such peace of mind... I tell ya' when I DO pay a fee, I actually feel good about it that the money is going to some place good. Gotta love it.

vote-for5vote-against

...and because I must:

Remember, remember the fifth of November
Gunpowder, treason and plot
I see no reason why gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Fawkes_Night

{Goodbye, BofA, Wells Fargo, Chase/PJMorgan, Citibank/Citigroup, USBank.}

vote-for13vote-against

I closed my Citibank account yesterday. I got a letter telling me they were going to charge me $15 a month unless I had at least $6,000 in deposits. When I approached the teller and said I wanted to close my account, she replied "did you get the infamous letter?"

vote-for7vote-against

Eh... I have checking accounts with a local bank and Chase, plus accounts with a couple of Internet only banks, plus an online brokerage account. My paycheck is direct deposited into the local bank and Chase.

Earlier this year when Chase changed their minimun required deposit to avoid fees I considered dumping them, but decided the hassle wasn't worth it, since it coincided with refinancing my mortgage. (I was able to skip two payments due to the refinancing, which made it a simple matter to change the direct deposit split, putting more cash into Chase and switching the mortgage autopayment to Chase.)

However, if Chase (or any of the other banks) changes things so that I have to pay a fee to lend them my money, rest assured that I'll switch banks if I cannot juggle things to avoid the fee.

vote-for9vote-against

In the process of switching to a credit union now.

vote-for7vote-against

I have to spend time on the phone with Wells Fargo far too often to resolve stuff going on in my accounts. The other day I spoke with a WF credit card supervisor who would not give me a satisfactory answer to a process of theirs and was rude to the point that he repeatedly gave me the option to cancel my card with them. I was thinking of closing my WF accounts. I don't like to do things rashly so I'm going to investigate credit unions in my area but yeah...I'm interested in making the switch.

vote-for10vote-against

No, because I switched over from Chase already when they dropped the free checking.

A big thumbs up to credit unions, who's role is NOT to line the pockets of the stockholders, but to keep it in the community and among the members (with better rates).

vote-for10vote-against

Maybe they should have named it "Transfer Bank Day" to gain more interest. "Bank Transfer Day" sounds like I should go online and wire someone money.

vote-for8vote-against

Switched away from a bank to a credit union 25 years ago. Never looked back.

vote-for9vote-against

My banking is already with done with local banks. Sadly, the economy made one bank a takeover target by PNC. So even my good intentions can come undone.

vote-for10vote-against

@sstaylor: 20 years ago for me. Been banking local ever since.

vote-for9vote-against

Local bank for me and I'm getting my mortgage out of Cenlar and to a local bank even if it has to be for a shorter period or higher rate.

vote-for4vote-against

remember remember the 5th of November

vote-for5vote-against

The month (several years back) that BoA took over my regional bank and started charging fees I left them & went to a local bank. Never looked back. I do, however, belong to another bank & the moment that one starts charging fees, they're history too.

vote-for2vote-against

wow, it took some people a long time to figure out a credit union is better for you than a large bank.

My experience, and limited to just my two credit unions in my area, fantastic. Better rates on mortgage, car, and cds,and no real fees.

vote-for3vote-against

My local credit union is minimally better than a bank in interest given for savings and CD accounts, and more expensive for a checking account - no free checks, no interest, nothing extra. It wasn't always this way. When founded, the CU was an employee CU for the company I worked at. The company went bankrupt and closed down, The CU first changed names to disassociate from the company, then was taken over by another CU. The new CU doesn't care for it's "members", its just another bank.
I'll keep my free interest earning checking with the bank. Besides, this is Saturday, the credit union is closed. (B of A is open this morning.)

vote-for3vote-against

@ecriscit: Okay, I wasn't going to add this to the mix, but your comment got me going... I belonged to a credit union that, in my state, was backed by the state (not the feds). One January 1st, the governor announced that effective immediately all the credit unions in the state guaranteed by the state would be closed. (Apparently due to corruption by the state personnel administering this program.) You can't imagine the havoc this caused for thousands of ppl, myself included. No access to any money in those credit unions for at least 6 months. The checks for my property taxes, life insurance, house insurance, and mortgage payments, all due at the end of December, bounced. Many moons later some of the credit unions were allowed to reopen with the credit union equivalent of FDIC. I don't know if any other state is or was ever like mine, but if your credit union does not have FDIC insurance (or whatever the credit union equivalent is called), be afraid, be very afraid.

vote-for4vote-against

Credit unions for me since 1995.

My only experience with the big banks is positive. I use their credit cards and pay the balance every month, so they're effectively paying me (in cash-back rewards) to hold their money for a few weeks.

vote-for4vote-against

@ecriscit: I did have a savings account with the credit union already, but the large bank was still a bit more convenient (in locations) vs. the CU and its partner members. That extra bit was NOT worth a $10 "service fee", however.

My Chase account used to be Washington Mutual's, which used to be Home Saving's, which used to be Fidelity Federal's, which used to be Coast Federal's, which was opened in 1994. To Chase's credit, their associate was very friendly, helpful, and understanding when I closed my account, but ultimately, it wasn't up to him to set the rules or provide allowances either.

My mortgage is NOT with my credit union, however. When I bought my home 2+ years ago, they were at a 5.125% with 0.5 points; my agent arranged a 4.25% with effectively 0 points by taking advantage of the seller's credits if we used their preferred lender.

vote-for3vote-against

Haven't banked with the 'CitiChase of America' type banks for years. I'm on a first-name basis with the staff at my regional bank - from the President down to the tellers, get amazing service, and no insanity-level fees.

I'd be happy to participate in this "opt out" day if I could! Highly suggest it to those who are considering. It's a hassle, yes, to change. Doubt you'll regret it though.

vote-for2vote-against

I'm pretty sure Citibank is actually an Italian Company...

Why?

Because I love hearing my Italian Aunt say "Citibank" with her accent: In Italian a leading "C" on a word is pronounced softly - more like "SH" instead of "S"...

So when she says "Citibank" the Italian way... Yep, that's right on the money!

vote-for3vote-against

I saw the light in 1981 after my mom died. Clearing her affairs, I discovered her local bank charged her an "inactivity" fee on her savings account, which was promptly closed. Now they are also part of a conglomerate.

I now belong to 5 credit unions for various accounts and am very happy.

vote-for1vote-against

I am already in a credit union. But I heard on John and Ken from 640 AM radio that the occupy Oakland group actually opened an account with Wells Fargo Bank using $20,000 received from donations. WTF!