questionshow do mosquitoes get into the house?

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You think that's amazing? I'd like to know how moths get into my light fixtures. They are completely sealed and screwed on tight but I can still see the dead moths at the bottom of the glass.

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Any way they can. Perhaps hitching a ride on your hair or clothing. Of via a small gap or tear in one of your screens.

You actually should put the bug zappers NOT by both doors (maybe 10-15 feet away). (They attract bugs and kill the ones that get too close... but some of the bugs are attracted but miss, possibly going to the door instead.)

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They fly in with you as you enter or leave the house.

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Unless you teleport into and out of your house, your door has to be open at least a couple times of day. And if you come home in the late afternoon/early evening, that's when mosquitoes are most active.

But on a related note....

Where do fruit flies come from? You'll have a bunch of bananas sitting around for days and no bugs. Then all of a sudden one day, when they've turned brown....those little flies are EVERYWHERE. It's like they've sprung forth from out of the rotten fruit or something.

(I do know the answer to that, but it just struck me as funny and suspiciously true when I heard a coworker ask it one day.)

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I grew up in Wisconsin, where the mosquitoes came in two sizes: small enough to squeeze in through the holes in the screen door, and big enough to open it and walk through.

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Same way that flies do. I swear they stalk the doors, just waiting for someone to open one and then they slip on in.

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You didn't know they study under a ninja master before setting out on their own?

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@reginafilangee: Wash the bananas. Fruitflies can appear from eggs attached to the skins of bananas.

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@reginafilangee: Actually, teleporting moves the bugs in the vicinity along with the target person. I have always wondered why Star Trek rarely had issues with the process. The movie "The Fly" is an example of teleportation gone bad.

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I recently read somewhere that bug zappers aren't effective for killing mosquitoes and that is better to have a fan at your doorway or around you to keep them off.

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The screen on my sliding glass door wasn't flush with the other door panes so things were able to maneuver their way in. Maybe you have something like that going on. I ended up placing a long strip of foam on the inside of the screen frame so that it would make a seal with the door pane. Haha...I don't know how to describe it better than that.

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@nortonsark: The technology in the universe where I'm from is much more advanced and can differentiate and reassemble molecules properly, based upon DNA sequencing......so we don't have the type of problem that occurred in "The Fly"....

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If you can get into your house then it stands to reason that things much smaller and faster then you can. Get over it. No matter what you do--something at some point will slip through. You're going to have to learn to accept that.

Now since I don't have the answer on how to teleport into your house without bringing the surrounding air and bugs in....

Bug zappers don't really work. If you have a real mosquito problem (doesn't sound like it) or just a real fear of them, it's probably a good idea to do some actual research into what really is effective. And maybe some research (not scary attention grabbing headlines) into West Nile. I know its scary, but your odds of dying from West Nile are low. And scientists now think that it's not about whether or not you get West Nile--they think many people have and have never even gotten sick.

Try a good basic info site like http://www.getridofthings.com/pests/mosquitoes/ to start and then do some in depth research--if only for piece of mind.

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@reginafilangee:
They don't just come on bananas--for fruit flies it's important to understand them a little better. Fruit flies prefer a diet of yeast, in a 24 hour life cycle can be incredibly destructive. Let's say one little female comes in for the outdoors, and make it's way into your house and lays some eggs and your fresh fruit. Now in this scenario your house was miraculously free of all fruit flies in any form--fly, egg, larvae. It lays it's eggs and now you've got hundreds of larvae chewing towards the center of the fruit and wow, they're laying their own eggs.

This (http://www.discovery.com/area/skinnyon/skinnyon970718/skinny1.html) is a great read on how they can get into your life, most articles deal with how to get rid of them, and give prevention tips, but without understanding, prevention isn't really possible.

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@reginafilangee:
Also, for help actually getting rid of them once you have them, more then just prevention, these are two great articles which balance each other nicely:
http://www.getridofthings.com/pests/flies/get-rid-of-fruit-flies.htm
http://www.thebugsquad.com/fruit-flies/how-to-get-rid-of-fruit-flies

If you do have a fruit fly outbreak, doing the initial cleaning and killing isn't enough. there are little eggs and larvae hidden everywhere and you have to be vigilant, and keep it up and wait for them to come and kill again.

Or you could just burn the house down and start fresh on the moon. Whichever's easier.

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@cengland0: Moths can get into a lot of things. It's only incredible that a moth got into that light fixture if it was completely and totally airtight. Which I'm guessing it wasn't...it probably wasn't designed to be. This is a real problem when dealing with moths in the home, because it doesn't matter that that food was in a completely sealed plastic container or glass container--you need something heavy duty and completely air tight. Jars that close with clamps and rubber gaskets are moth proof. Plain screw-top jars will work, but only if they have a rubber stopper. You think that light fixture was as air tight as putting something in a plastic bag, duct-taping it and sticking it in the freezer? When people need to stop moths from getting in places, that's what they resort to. You don't want moths someplace, then you're going to have to really beef it up. Find me something they can't get into and I'll be impressed, not the other way around. Those things are scary.

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@anoted: Thanks....but maybe you didn't read my entire post?

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@reginafilangee: I was on a roll and someone had already replied to you with an partially correct answer so I just kept going with every bug people kept mentioning.

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The comments to date hit it, but I would add that they can get in through cracks in the foundation/slap, gaps in the attic vents, and any other way that outside air can get in.

If you having a real problem (not just once in a while) it is worth it to closely inspect you home for gaps that mosquitos can get in. And cold air escape in the summer time and hot air in the winter, so there are other reasons to do this as well. There are cauks and foams (available at Home Depot and the like) that will fill these cracks for you. If you are uncomfortable with doing this, there are firms that will take care of it for you. In some places the cost of the audit and repairs is subsidized by your power company.

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@wilfbrim: exactly. they're bugs. if you're home isn't air tight, they can get in. so do the best you can to keep them from getting in any place you don't need to be able to--not leaving the door open to argue at someone or watch someone walk away in slow motion also helpful.

don't leave things around your house to attract them--if they aren't around your house to begin with, the odds are fewer they'll end up in it even though you do have to open the door to get in. and you can use proper detractors, etc.

And for people who have problems with small bugs, but want to have some fresh air, you can always get better/different screens for your doors (http://bit.ly/Nw3Egu) and windows (http://bit.ly/LZOwnz).

Just start with taking proper care of your home (what you can and can't see), and the surrounding area. Any added protection or prevention, that comes after. When you see if it's necessary and when you've built a proper foundation for it.