questionscan you recommend a great intermediate cookbook?

vote-for9vote-against
vote-for5vote-against

Alton Brown's books are great for learning the techniques and the science behind them. And he's a funny guy.

http://www.amazon.com/Alton-Brown/e/B001JRWOIO/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

vote-for5vote-against

Americas' Test Kitchen Cookbook every recipe turns out perfect. They recommend what brands to use. Every thing is tested you can't go wrong. They explain why they use each tecnique.

Link : http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_30?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=americas+test+kitchen+cookbook&sprefix=americas+test+kitchen+cookbook

vote-for4vote-against

Both @oheifearnain and @durkzilla's recommendations are excellent.

In fact the approach taken by both ATK - Cook's Illustrated and Alton Brown are similar in that they explain the 'whys' of technique, ingredients and equipment which for me at least makes it easier to translate them from one application to another. Both do occasionally go a little AR-overboard but they also identify wonderful shortcuts.

The ATK Family Cookbook is my overall favorite as it has a very broad range of dishes along with how-to illustrations.

The PBS TV shows from Cook's Illustrated ("America's Test Kitchen" and "Cook's Country") are very informative too. And if you DVR and skip the show sponsor mentions they are only around 20 - 25 minutes long. Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words after all.

CI also has magazines and just excellent subscription-based web sites, too.

Did I mention that I like Cook's Illustrated? ;-)

vote-for4vote-against

I really like "How to Cook Everything" by Mark Bittman, who writes The Minimalist food column for the New York Times. Check here http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/mark_bittman/index.html for a little bio on him, plus info on other books he's written and links to some of his columns.

vote-for4vote-against

My house decided to blow a pipe and freeze (literally, it was in ice) in January 2010, and I've been without a kitchen since. A few weeks earlier, I bought this book: http://www.amazon.com/Ratio-Simple-Behind-Everyday-Cooking/dp/1416571728/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1288844792&sr=8-1

I can't speak to how good the book is in practice (since my kitchen is almost, but not quite done) -- but I like the principle of it. As opposed to the other cookbooks, it focus on teaching improvisational cooking. It provides a very basic recipe and suggests variations on the recipe. Seems appropriate for an intermediate chef to me.

vote-for3vote-against

The Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook. This is my go-to cookbook for just about anything. It also has charts for meat cook times, some helpful substitutions, and other handy bits of information. It now comes in a ring binder so it'll lie flat and you can remove single pages to hang up while you're cooking. It doesn't have the science-y stuff that Alton's books has, but it has a lot of good basic recipes (like scrambled eggs!) and more advanced type stuff that I've never heard of before. I love this cookbook.

http://www.amazon.com/Better-Homes-Gardens-Cook-Plaid/dp/0470556862/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1288875469&sr=1-1-spell

vote-for2vote-against

I really love Ina Garten, I have the following cookbook really simple and tasty recipes :-)

http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=672401&CCAID=FROOGLE672401

vote-for4vote-against

Seconded - The Joy of Cooking. It is a great all-purpose cookbook, it explains the how's and why's, and covers everything from beginner level dishes to pretty complex cuisine.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0026045702/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_2?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0684818701&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=13AJ53FP1NNKZ61NN36N

vote-for2vote-against

LOL why BUY a cookbook??

There are SO many places on the internet to get good recipies?
This is my favorite-Bed and Breakfast cookbook-LOL online that it

http://www.bbonline.com/recipe/
You can even buyhard copies here if you want to
http://www.bbonline.com/recipe/index.html#cookbook

Food network also has a nice website to check out Alton Brown and Everyone else from the network-

LOL to many good questions but I have to get back to work or I will have to fire myself!

vote-for2vote-against

@coyhaven you are right foodnetwork is a really great website I use it all the time it has a wide rang of recipes from easy to more difficult. Def worth checking out!

vote-for2vote-against

My all-time favorite cookbook: Unplugged Kitchen by Viana la Place

http://www.amazon.com/Unplugged-Kitchen-Return-Authentic-Cooking/dp/0688113133

Recipes and stories, delicious and interesting!

vote-for2vote-against

You cannot go wrong with The Joy of Cooking. Still edited by the family and has received a modern update, it's my go-to resource for everything. I also love Cuisine at Home, as a periodical.

My next purchase will be Michael Ruhlman's Ratio:
http://books.simonandschuster.com/Ratio/Michael-Ruhlman/9781416566113

vote-for2vote-against

Another vote for The Joy of Cooking. Hands down, one of the best, if not the best cookbook ever made.

vote-for2vote-against

Wow, you guys and gals are awesome! Thank you so, so much. This is supposed to be a gift so hopefully she doesn't see this thread! Just to repeat: Does anyone have any recommendations on the foreign cuisine I mentioned? That was more of a shot in the dark, I'll admit. And even without it, this has been more than I could have hoped for. Seriously. Woot on, wooters.

vote-for1vote-against

@mrbrightside: This is the most highly rated and bestselling Argentine cookbook on Amazon (besides a grilling-only one): http://www.amazon.com/Argentina-Cooks-Treasured-Hippocrene-Cookbook/dp/0781809975/

And here is a general Latin American cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/South-American-Table-Authentic-Patagonia/dp/1558322485/

vote-for1vote-against

Meta Givens, "Modern Encyclopedia of Cooking" from the 50s. Get both volumes on Ebay. That is...if you're seriously looking for a real cookbook...

vote-for1vote-against

Michael Ruhlman's Ratio is also very good and available in paperback. All the recipes are simple ratios of ingredients. Its very easy to follow and since every is a simple ratio, you don't need to reference it often.

http://www.amazon.com/Ratio-Simple-Behind-Everyday-Cooking/dp/1416571728/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1288958590&sr=8-1

vote-for1vote-against

Hmm how did I miss the part about this being a gift LOL I must not have had enough coffee for brain to connect-Sorry about that-LOL

Years ago before all the fuss about Jeff Smith-AKA The Frugal Gormet on PBS I bought a few of his cookbooks out of the goodwill. He went to the different countries and studied how they made food and adapted a lot of it for his show. His cookbooks are informative and funny(He and Alton Brown would get along cause they must talk the entire time they make food)

Since life has turned to being ECO friendly take a visit to your local Goodwill and puruse the cook books there,I have found good Amish, Italian, Greek and some other interesting cookbooks-This may sound "gross" but find a well used, well cooked on book-stained and messed up-those are normally the good ones(that is how you can tell which one my mom uses LOL)-write down the title and try to find a good clean one on ebay(take hand sanitzer with you to bathe in after I have been through the Goodwill)

vote-for2vote-against

Wasn't there a deals.woot cookbook that was being compiled? As a slight but related threadjack... If we get it pulled together, it might be nice. I had a decent feijoada recipe (which I've lost, subsequently, but can probably figure out how to recreate) -- it's Brazilian (which is South American, but not, obviously, Argentinian) -- and goes well with a nice Caipirinha.

vote-for1vote-against

great cook book for anyone who might be perusing this site. cooking for geeks: real science, great hacks and good food.

http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Geeks-Science-Great-Hacks/dp/0596805888