questionswhat do think about stores being open on…

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Not everyone has family nearby. This year will be the first time I have had Thanksgiving with family in 30 years. My mom is coming to visit, so I probably will not be going shopping this year on Thanksgiving, unless she wants to get up before dawn and come with me. I usually do go to the KMart Thanksgiving sale. They have great sales on blankets and bedding, so I replace any electric blankets I need that day and buy a lot of sherpa throws and lap blankets to give to friends for Christmas and for the seniors on the Giving Tree. I also usually buy my winter shoes and fuzzy boots on that sale. I enjoy the Thanksgiving shopping more than the BF shopping, as there are fewer shoppers and they seem more civil. Most people in the local service and manufacturing industries were forced under 30 hours a week long before the ACA. My friends who work in the service industry are glad for every hour they can get. The staff at the KMart I go to is very upbeat and helpful on the T-Day sale.

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Thanksgiving is a day for family. Period. I boycott stores that make their staff work on major holidays and will continue to do so. If they want to open at 4AM the day after, fine (though they won't find me in line that early). Corporate greed is the only reason the stores open on major holidays and I refuse to support that in any way.

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I agree with bigelowb. I don't like that stores feel the need to be open on Thanksgiving and make their workers give up the holiday. I feel bad for the employees who have to work when they would rather be home with family (and I know there are lots that would prefer the day off, just as there are those who welcome the hours).

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There are lots of jobs that aren't retail that don't get a special day off. When I was in the Air Force I got one Thanksgiving off and that was only because I was in training. My wife has been deployed or TDY for about 1/2 of the holidays since we've been married. People still have to work in hospitals and first responders are still working that day. People are still working at the power plant. So, do I feel sorry for people that work retail that have to work that day? Not particularly. Do I feel burdened by the Air Force and the need to keep the machine running 24/7? Nope. You can always celebrate on a different day.

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@zuiquan: I disagree here. People who choose professions like military, police, firemen, hospital workers and others where it is NECESSARY for people to be on duty on holidays do so willingly. It is absolutely not necessary for most retail stores to be open on major holidays. Heck, even the car dealers are closed on those days. While I do feel bad for those in the emergency professions on holidays, it is recognized by all that this is necessary and hopefully the same folks don't get stuck on the job every year. It is not necessary in retail.

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@bigelowb: Apparently the people who run the businesses feel that it is necessary for those establishments to be open. So, when you willingly go to work for a business that is open on a particular day, you either work that day or find a different job. Or start a union and stop putting getting pushed around by "the man".

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It's a free country.

Edit: If they can make money, why wouldn't they? I used to work retail and they offered extra holiday pay to the employees who worked on holidays. I was never pressured to work those days, but I always wanted to.

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The world has changed a lot in the last 30 years, and a significant number of people (1) have no nearby family, (2) can't afford to travel to visit family, (3) split the holiday who-goes-where plans with other family members, (4) don't place much emphasis on T'giving as being "for family," or (5) like the OT pay for working on holidays.

At one time or another over the last 30 years, I've been in every one of those categories. I come from a very small family. Thanksgiving has never been a big deal to me, since as a kid it was spent with the same three family members I had dinner with every other night, just dampened by my mother's exhaustion after spending the entire day in the kitchen on a meal that lasted 20 minutes. Years later, I celebrated the day on Friday, so my son could spend Thursday with his dad and their extended family. Now, my son and DIL are in town only on alternate holidays.

I suspect I'm not the only person for whom it's really just not that big of a deal.

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@bsmith1: For a while I worked for AOL and routinely volunteered to work on holidays. I had no family nearby, so my volunteering meant someone who wanted the day off could take it, the work load was very light, and if anyone did call in they were surprised and grateful they could get help even on a holiday. Oh, and let's not forget the double-time pay.

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This Thanksgiving, I'm thankful for the gas stations being open, so I can buy gas on my travels. Also, I'm thankful for the fast food joints being open so I don't starve on the road trip. Finally, I'm thankful to places like Walgreens being open so I can buy Tylenol for my headaches caused by too much family time.

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I bet for those who like the extra money that comes with working Thanksgiving they love it. Thanksgiving for me is a day of rest so I will not be shopping. I do feel bad for those who feel forced to work that day but when I was younger and needed the money, this would of been a blessing.

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I do not do the Black Friday thing. I worked 10 Christmases in retail and now it gives me some serious PTSD.
This year my mom and I are taking a few days away over Thanksgiving in a historical/touristy town in our state. I'm kind of hoping at least something will be open Thanksgiving day so we don't end up staring at the TV in the hotel. We probably won't do too much shopping, but it would be nice to have that option.
Truthfully, my mom is the only member of my family I can stand, I look forward to escaping from the rest of them!
Bah humbug!

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It's a free country. I hate blue laws that tell merchants what hours they can open. If two parties come to an agreement to exchange services for money, let them. If you don't want to work at Walmart on Thanksgiving, do something to improve your circumstances, educate yourself, learn job skills, etc so you can find a job that gives the day off.

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@kamikazeken: Word. Here, the liquor stores can't even be open on Sunday! Why? I guess it makes Jesus cry or something... If's funny how conservatives are against big government until it helps enforce their moral agendas.

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@kamikazeken: I'd like to see less stores open on Thanksgiving. It's not just the employees that suffer. Family time for people who have the day off suffers. I don't want to end the day early to be home in time for 8 PM shopping, but I also count on BF sales to buy things like bed sheets that are otherwise too expensive the entire rest of the year.

I don't mind blue laws for holidays. Even if someone can improve their circumstance and get away from Wal-Mart, someone else has to fill the job opening. You can't rise to the top without pushing someone else down. Many people think those people need protected. Unions are one way, laws are another.

At one time, factory conditions made it common for people to lose life and limb while servicing machinery. So you can agree, hopefully, that there comes a point where "freedom" takes a backseat to freedom. We may disagree where that line is, but about the only way not to be a party to the abuse of low-wage workers is through the law.

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@kamikazeken: We moved to Texas from Illinois. Although we lived in many states, Texas was our first home in the Bible belt. Not long after moving here my mom started lobbying hard to move back to civilization. She thought living in a place where you could not buy a baby bottle at the grocery store on Sunday but you could buy beer and wine was pure madness. She was working 50-60 hours a week and trying to run a household of 8 (10 if you count the dog and cat) and the state took away half the weekend which was the only time she was able to shop for the family's needs. Fortunately the blue law is a thing of the past, at least in this part of Texas.

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I used to work at Walmart and had to work every Thanksgiving and Black Friday. Had to work Christmas Eve too :(

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It's interesting that the majority of the discussion has been in consideration of the workers.
I think about -- do we really need to have kmart, et. al open on the holiday to have sales ?
I don't want to shop that day. I don't have a big family. We don't do a lot. But it's nice to have folks stop and not be all caught up in the "what's on sale" question. Not sure I'm explaining this well....... anyone know what I mean ?

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They were open in the 60s and 70s. I remember going shopping after eating the Thanksgiving meal.