questionsanyone on psych meds and willing to discuss it…

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according to my research there are a lot more options. i found that an antidepressant with built in antianxiety works best for me. i know someone that has been on the same antidepressant for over ten years and just upped dosage (doc says there is no top end to that kind). and my sister has been on several thru the years-some better than others, but found loosing the husband the best antidepressant.
if doc says he's out of options, then it's time to either do your own research on what's available or find a new doc.

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@matt1976: More information would be helpful... What are you taking? What have you tried? What do you need medication for? etc.

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Bipolar type I with schizoeffective disorder.

I've been through probably 20 different medications over the past 2 years, which marked the start of my second "episode".

I get frustrated because a cocktail will work well for about 6 months, then begin to fail. Mood stability starts tanks and the "negative" symptoms start to get to me. When this starts to happen, I tend to stop taking medication and things go haywire.

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I just wanted to say that I think that you are very honest and open for posting this question. However, please be careful when considering any advice given over your current situation. Make sure you discuss any changes with a professional first.
Many of the clients I work with use psychotropic medications. I have found that they must take a holistic approach to their mental health, and medication is only one component. Some people find therapy/counseling useful, as well as different relaxation and coping techniques. Also, nutrition seems to be a key factor. Simple dietary changes can sometimes have very positive results.
Good luck

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Right now I've been on Lamictal and Tegretol for long enough that things are starting to peter out on me. The 2 medications are controlling the "positive" symptoms but failing on the "negative" symptoms.

This makes everyone else's life easier, but makes mine sort of a bummer.

I fully understand that any information gathered from this thread is probably not from trained medical personnel. I'm not looking for that, rather just discussion between others who may be going through the same thing that I am.

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@atd15: Early on, I got in the mindset that this wasn't something I was doing to myself. I look at it as being cancer of the psyche and soul. Cancer sufferers don't have anything to hide and though there is still a lot of social stigma associated with mental illness, there shouldn't be. The only way we can get rid of the social stigma is by educating people and letting them know that we're people like them, we just live lives that are sometimes a lot more "interesting".

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@matt1976: Check out this paper. I'm not an expert, but know some people in the field.

Probably don't need to say this, but don't get this through a nutritional store; they are very unreliable and unregulated. Get your doctor to prescribe it.

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@matt1976: I don't have anything useful to add, but as a part of this community, and society in general, wanted to express my support. I hope that you are able to find the perfect dose, that works for you. I also hope you never meet Tom Cruise, as he can be a bit of an ass about this topic. : D

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I want to reemphasize the need for a professional mental health MD to prescribe and control medication. There are some meds out there that you simply cannot just cease taking without severe withdrawal and some which require a tapering up (as well as the tapering down). My husband was treated for anxiety when actually he had a brain problem that could not be fixed with meds. Only the psychiatrist he finally saw came up with the correct answer. Unfortunatly, there are some internal medicine and general practitioners who prescribe when they should refer. There is NO WAY I am suggesting that your doc has misdiagnosed you; I post this only to tell people to see the proper professional for the correct diagnosis and medication - and then sometimes it is not working. Medications that affect brain chemistry are tricky and can wear out after awhile he/I was told.

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@okham: Thanks for the link. I'll definitely be giving that a read this evening.

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@klozitshoper: I appreciate your concern. I haven't seen a GP in years, all of my care has been done by a psychiatrist. I fear that my situation my be similar to your husband's though.

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No, but I have friends and family that do to include a daughter-in-law that lives with us right now. It's VERY clear when she's not on her meds, and clear when combinations don't help. We've encouraged her to really TALK to the doc and get things on track...that has helped a lot.

Good luck with finding what works for you.

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@matt1976: Not having any of these problems my self but have a few family members who are constantly dealing with the same of which you speak. I just want to say good luck and hope your frriends and family are there to support you with everything. Have a great evening!

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@matt1976: I just had to come back after seeing your message in my email. If you are at all concerned about a brain problem, by all means see a neurologist. You do not have (I can tell you from this distance) the same problem (frontotemporal lobe dementia) that my husband had. He would not have been able to put the sentences together after all that time! Psych meds do very often have to be changed and or "tweaked" over time - not unusual. It would not hurt if you doubt the care you are getting to seek another opinion. My husband prior to his diagnosis was a genius IQ and a fantastic artist, engineer, and writer. Don't worry - you may feel rotten, but you come across just fine.

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Let me add my voice in support - stay with it, and all encouragement to you.

I have a sister who refuses to be treated for her schizophrenia - she is in denial. I worry for her, and for her 5-year-old son and my elderly mother, with whom she lives. She has psychotic breaks and anyone who tries to mention her illness is automatically added to the "enemies" list. Mental illness should not be stigmatized - as someone mentioned, it's every bit as legitimate and treatable as, for example, cancer.

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@klozitshoper: So sorry that things went bad for him and I'm sorry that you probably feel terrible about it. I hope the future brings better things for both of you.

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I'm getting a little panicky, because I'm hitting the "wall," where I'm becoming frustrated with the medications not solving all of my problems, but I'm still having to deal with the side effects of them.

Traditionally, this is where I ditch the medications. I 'spose I'm just looking for support where I can find it.

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@matt1976: Thank you. It was a really tough road to travel for both of us. However, the one saving grace, if you can call it that, is that people with his type of problem are totally unaware that they do have a problem, even in the beginning. I encourage you to discuss this problem of yours with your current psych and explain how you feel. The worst thing you can do in some instances is to go cold turkey off of a drug - the reactions/withdrawal can be brutal. I am unsure if there are any drugs in existence that can make everything OK - it is still an effort you have to make to get through and keep on keeping on. If there IS a happy - no problems - no anguish pill out there and you find it, may I be first on the list for the name? Good luck.

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It's too bad that the teams of people who make psych meds aren't those that suffer from the conditions that the medications are meant to treat.

Sure, it doesn't sound like the best idea, but generally the mentally ill are above average intelligence. I've read some interesting evolutionary theories written by well published psychologists and anthropologists.

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@matt1976: That was an interesting comment. I spent some time working with people who suffer from HIV/AIDS. The drug rep couldn't understand why many people failed to take their medication. When we talked to clients and asked them, they told us that although the side effects were an issue, the pills were too big to swallow without gagging.
The drug company spent millions of dollars developing medications, but nobody had the daily experience of having to take multiple large pills everyday.
I know it is off topic, but I agree that there should be greater interaction between pharmaceutical companies and clients.