questionswhat are your thoughts on "juicing" (weight loss)?

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There's no real secret solution to weightloss.

It's been proven (even via an all junk-food diet (1) ) that it really just comes down to consuming fewer calories than you're burning in a day. There are a number of tools to work out how much you're likely to burn in a day just by living, based on height, gender, etc.. that kind of thing. (2) That's called your BMR. Once you've got that number, just watch the calories you put in and the calories you burn working out.

The only thing fad diets are good for is keeping motivation up, if that. Frankly, from my experience, the noticeable results you'll see from a couple of weeks "on the wagon" will help enough with motivation you won't need anything else.

Oh, and get your thyroid function checked if this doesn't work.

Just keep this true:

BMR + WorkoutCalories > FoodCalories

1) http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/11/08/twinkie.diet.professor/index.html
2) http://health.discovery.com/tools/calculators/basal/basal.html

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I'm aware there's no secret. I once read an eBook called the Hacker's Diet that boiled weight loss down to an engineering problem similar to how you just described it. My question is only to get people's opinion on this particular method of weight loss. I have a few opinions but I was curious to see what others have to say about it.

Thanks!

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@sirlouie: Well, if you want specifics, bear in mind that some vegetables actually have improved bioavailability of their nutrients post-cooking, rather than raw. I may be wrong, but I seem to remember lycopene in tomatoes being one such example. My significant other and most of her family juice, but, compared to other means of ingestion, it doesn't seem to have any noticeable impacts. Given the prep and cleanup, I think a salad may be less work over all, and often a more enjoyable eating experience. Provided you stick to a healthy (homemade maybe) dressing, I'd expect you'd get comparable net results.

If you do go juicing, I recommend Breville units. They really do a great job at extraction and they're pretty well designed in terms of eliminating nooks and cranies that can make cleaning harder.

If you're looking to do a grind-it-all approach, rather than juicing, I would recommend looking into a commercial bar blender rather than a vitamix-type unit. Better bang per buck.

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Yeah, I tried the juice diet for about a week.

I felt awful and hungry for the entire week. Cleaning the juicer took at least an hour a day after making my daily juice. I think I stopped because of the cleaning rather than the feeling hungry. Going to the bathroom is just as fun as you think it is.

I'd suggest using a blender and making fruit and vegetable smoothies rather than juicing. You'll feel less hungry.

Honestly, I feel it is better used as a cleanse rather than a full diet. Or maybe do it once a week when you don't mind feeling horrible at home.

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If it works for you, and you're getting all the needed nutrients, I guess go for it. But, it doesn't seem like a long-term solution to maintaining.

I use MyFitnessPal.com to count my daily calories for me (which is what matters). I guess if you do a juice diet, and then add in actual food, and stay within your caloric goals, it should work. Or, longer term, a hybrid would work.

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@psaux: It's not actually as simple as calories in/calories out, that much has been proven as well. The things you eat have an effect on how fast you gain or lose weight.

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I like to replace one meal a day with juicing and that helps me lose weight when I need to. To help with the hunger I add chia seeds to the juice.