questionshow many of you burned out your retinas watching…

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We had a typhoon passing by, but the skies cleared enough for us to catch Venus - so tiny!
We had our special viewer we used from the annular eclipse a couple weeks back, so no harming the eyes. I went to my daughter's school over her lunch break so she and her friends could check it out since it is a once in a lifetime thing.

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I did -- what a small dot!! I used a two-sided DVD to view the sun. One of those little tid bits floating around in my head remembering I could see the filament in a lightbulb when I held up a DVD with no printing (inspecting for scratches and gouges).

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We actually had heavy clouds, so I didn't get to see. But Conan had an amusing video of the transit of Venus (Williams), so I don't feel like I missed out.

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I did watching through a digital camera screen. Still hurt like hell. Got a couple good shots though with the solar lens.

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@granilithe: Are you sharing the pics?

I just caught the tv version.

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@mellielou: What a great idea! I wish I'd thought of that for yesterday. I think I still have a few old-style light bulbs around, and will look at their filaments later. :-)
I might even draw a black dot on it before turning it on and pretend I'm looking at Venus.

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A few of the woot team (@danco, @josefresno, and @javamatte) went to the top of the building to try to catch a glimpse.

@danco had his eclipse blackout shades from last week, so we took turns staring into the cloudy sky.

I wasn't able to see anything, but apparently others were more lucky. I took a photo of what I saw:

https://twitter.com/joneholland/status/210140947705626624

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@okham: Oh, pooh---I missed that, too! Sounds hilarious.

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@joneholland: I can't see Venus in there, but ooooooooh, that looks so eerie. Sorta like a black hole, but white. Thanks for posting the pic! :-)

We had clear skies, I'd been planning to watch, but was still ill-prepared when the time came.

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my monitor's not that bright.

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Was cloudy, no chance here :( I did look at the sky and saw a black dot in the clouds. Does that count?

(Dot turned out to be an airplane)

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Too much weather for me to see anything :(
(and you could still read this question if you had voice software!)

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I am one of the did-not-see-it crowd.

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I got to see it when we went up to the roof (@danco is my old pre-woot-era account) and then my wife and I drove down to Federal Way and I got a much clearer view when the sun dropped below the clouds. Those eclipse glasses were a great investment. In a couple of weeks, I got to see an annular eclipse (from Medford, OR) and the transit of Venus. If there are any decently sized sunspots, you can also see those on any sunny day.

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Something I learned for future solar events, go to a welders supply shop and get shade 14 welders glass shield, its a 4" x 5" square of glass that let's you see the sun safely. I used this to photograph the eclipse and tried it on Venus here in California. It cost about $3 so it's cheaper then a camera filter. Green though, so no professional pictures come out, artistic though :-). (My photography is animal/object based, so i don't own a super telephoto lens)
Otherwise the 5pack of solar glasses I snagged on amazon worked great.