questionsdo you have a home emergency preparedness kit and…

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A collection of books including some general home medicine and remedies, flora and fauna and their uses, how to create simple engines, and other general how to books.

Also you should have at least one turtle. So he can chill next to you and you can be like, "At least I have a turtle."

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@cindihoward: Yes you can buy them. You can get a decent one for around 40-60 dollars. The shake flashlights are not bad either. I just will have my kids shake/crank whichever I need. I will hold a chocolate bar in front of them and have them pedal a bike attached to a pulley, attached to a small generator so I could still get my woot! on.

(Just kidding...maybe.)

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One other thing I always do is keep a few bandaids and alcohol wipes in the back of my wallet, always comes in handy.

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First you need some knowledge and friends. Knowing first aid, disaster preparedness and your neighbors might keep you alive. You need 2 gallons of water per person for at least 14 days. I used those 5 gallon jugs with a few drops of bleach and change them every 6 months. A CAN OPENER. Tins of tuna, fruit, and things you can eat cold. A first aid kit with a few weeks of everyone's medicine. Work gloves and tools including something to turn off the gas and water. All that camping gear finally comes in handy.

The best joke is that the list for what you need for Burningman will keep you alive for about two weeks.

Condoms -- for some reason surviving and boredom makes people horny.

FRS and CB radios almost work in disasters to keep up with each other.

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Agree with most of the above. I also have $500, minimal change of clothes, and some key documents/data/etc stored on a USB flash drive (birth certificates, passports, marriage certificate, SSN cards etc) that is encrypted. Good multi-tool also.

There are pros and cons to adding some sort of firearm to your kit, but it is worth at least considering.

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Growing up in multiple locations that had risks of natural disasters and pending attacks, I was used to these kinds of things. We had these air tight tubs. Giant things really. That held our items and could be used as a temporary flotation assistance devices. We had spam, potted meat, vienna sausages, purified water, iodine water purification tablets, mre's, ponchos, changes of clothes, flashlights, batteries, hand-cranked radio, and a deck of cards. (Skip-bo to be exact.)

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In case of emergency you should have stored food and water (duh), cash money in small bills (in case they can't break a $20 and/or the atm's are out), toilet paper (first thing people do in a big emergency is head to the grocery store and the first thing sold out is usually toilet paper). Don't forget you can use the water in your hot water heater for drinking too.

I got a hand cranked flashlight/radio/charger from woot a while back. Sent two to family in hurricane prone areas and the third one is next to the bed. Don't forget an emergency stash for the car too.

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@shrdlu @coolphilip04 When you are finished eating delicious turtle soup, you then can clean the shell and use it as a bowl, helmet, port-a-potty, etc.

Turtles are awesome.

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I think the shake lights are kind of a waste honestly...they produce pretty poor light and are usually not well made. Also they are so many good battery powered led flashlights its not really necessary. A good flashlight will have a low mode that can easily run for over 24 hours straight on one set of batteries, many lights can go well over 100 hours. With one set of extra batteries, 200 hours will last you a looooong time.

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those cheap $1.99 solar garden lights. Put them in your garden, and until you need them in an emergency, they will actually make your yard look nicer. Depending on the time of year, they'll give you light every night for 4=10 hours.

remember, your traditional tank-style water heater contains enough water to keep a family of 4 hydrated for a few weeks.

+1 on 5-gallon jug with a few drops of bleach. Personally, I prefer to keep about 8x 24-pack cases of .5 liter bottled water on hand. CVS's generic brand was $1.88 a case a few weeks ago, and they seem to be on sale at least once per month for under $2/case.

I got a cheapo hand-crank flashlight (about 6-7 inch size) that also has an am/fm radio and celphone charger with several tips to charge various celphones for $2.99 at a fleamarket a few years back, and have actually used it a few times.

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A manual can opener is useful if the electricity is out.

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One thing I haven't seen mentioned here is dry milk. With a kid in the house, we want to be prepared, so we keep several bags with our kit. Also, post-apocalyptic cereal is supposed to be outstanding.

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Rope, batteries, zip-ties, a couple of large tarps, feminine hygiene products, diapers, duct tape, wd-40.
And I think probably the MOST important thing to have in an emergency, is a plan. What if you aren't home and the kids are? Where do they go? Do you have a meeting spot for friends/family that may not be together to gather? Who do you call in to to see if everyone is alright? Keep the kids involved if you have them.

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I didn't see ammunition mentioned. I saw guns mentioned, but given a prolonged holdout, you might want to have a stockpile of ammo. So you can go hunting... not so you can steal other people's supplies... ;)

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@cindihoward For long-term medications (blood pressure etc), in the past, I've refilled as soon as allowed by insurance. Depending on the plan, that may give you a couple of days to a couple of weeks medication "extra". Repeat until you have the supply you want.

I've actually gotten to the point where I have a 90 day supply of just about everything (took 2+ years to accumulate). I just make sure that I rotate everything at least once per year. I take my latest mail-order delivery, stick it in the cellar, and bring the old up and use it.

p.s. Zip-ties are like duct tape - there are tons of uses for them. My latest use is to attach conduit to my chain-link fence to run wire for an invisible fence.

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@xarous: Thanks! I should ask a new question about hand-cranked radios. Can you still buy these? I also thought shake flashlights would be helpful.

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@coolphilip04: Good plan on the turtle. If you have the ability to make a nice campfire, you can make turtle soup.

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@attilathemom: I did not think of money. Neither had I considered the hot water heater for drinking. Great ideas. The toilet paper is a MUST and I will remember to equip the cars...thanks so much!!

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@shrdlu: Good plan on the turtle. If you have the ability to make a nice campfire, you can make turtle soup.

You make me laugh!!

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I've purchased a small tabletop stainless propane grill and 20# Propane tank...
Many Gas stoves will not work without an electric spark, so no power no gas stove... Don't forget matches.....

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Those of us in and above the Frost Belt need to know how to drain a hot water heating system if you lose power and the temps drop to freezing in house... Repair and replacement costs for a heating system are insane...

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@portezbie: Are you a nurse? That is a good idea and one my daughter should have given me..she is a nurse. Thanks.

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@flyinggirl: Very good suggestions, especially the plan! What do I use the zip-ties for? I have seen them advertized on daily deal websites but did not know what to use them for except electronic cords and I'm good with that.

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@75grandville: Documents on a flashdrive is something I would never have thought of...these suggestions are wonderful, I will put them together and post them sometime soon (Maybe as a question...lol). PS Got the Gun and the Bible covered!

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@bluefox801: Of course...Ammo! For good reasons only. Maybe protection from zombies after the emergency. But really, a Not-to-forget-item. Thanks!

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@loubriccant: Machete (for the zombies!!)

See gun and ammo above...but then a machete would be better for zombies, and maybe even other practical work. Good effort!

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@hobbitss: If they close enough for you to use a machete they are to close for comfort... Best to put up Barbed wire at your optimum rifle range, not to close and not to far away... Rattle cans tied to the wire will let you know when and where you have a new target...

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The http://www.amazon.com/American-CLIPRAY-ARCCR100R_SNG-Charger-Flashlight/dp/B003BYROUQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1305643096&sr=1-1-catcorr Clipray is an incredibly awesome thing to keep in every emergency preparedness kit you have - car, home, camping, whatever. It's a crank powered flashlight that's extremely bright that also has a USB charger powered by the crank dynamo so you can charge small electronics (read: your phone and ipod). It's well built and still fairly inexpensive. I was tempted to get a more all-in-one unit but couldn't really find one that was well suited to what I wanted it for. This is a pretty good compromise.

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Another commonly overlooked area for clean drinking water is in the holding tanks of toilets (only if you are sure that there have NOT been any chemical tabs or cleaning treatments in the tank though).

Additional items one might need:
A topographical map of your town or county
A compass to navigate to springs, creeks, etc nearby
Waterproof matches or lighters or magnesium fire starter
Small gas stove or plenty or wood/charcoal for cooking

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@coolphilip04: The books are a great idea...finally a REAL use for the HOW TO collection my husband has been acquiring...lol! But seriously, ya! I may pass on the turtle...if I am lucky I'll have a kid or two keeping me company and I will be saying how blessed I am they are safe with me...at least for the first few days.

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PS Whoever added the tags...thanks! I think I forgot... Glad there is a sharp monitor posting these!

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@madross: Good suggestions! I think a first aid book is a must and maybe even a day class. I will make a point to renew friendships with my neighbors...has been a while. Thanks for the water to person ratio: is that 2 gallons a day or 2 gallons for 14 days per person? Got the can openers and first aid kit. Will gather that extra (old) set of tools my husband has and some camping gear not yet donated to Goodwill. Had not thought about the medicine but I can see that would be helpful...not sure how to get a two week supply since they are scripts but I will ask the doc. No need for the condoms but thanks. I had to goggle Burningman. Great pics on the website..not my kind of gathering at this point in my life but what a remarkable concept. Finally, I have considered a CB radio in the past but didn't know if it was really worth it. I may need to look into it a bit more. Great ideas. BTW I could not find a supply list on the burningman website. Can you send me a link?

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@kamikazeken: The solar lights are a good addition...thanks...I'll be checking out 1saleaday or something.

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@hobbitss: I'll keep the barbed wire and tin cans in mind when I hear that zombies are in the area on my crank-radio. Thanks...lol

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@75grandville: Thanks for the suggestion on meds and info on the ties. Have a glorious day!

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I just buy extra stuff on sale. Did you see the extreme couponers? Kinda like that, on a small scale. It's easy (and cheap) to keep a month to six months supply of everything, especially canned food and toilet paper, on hand at all times. I still have a dozen cans of cranberries from Xmas!
Don't forget cookery stuff. Cast iron and stainless steel pots and pans last forever. You can get aluminum coffee pots, cups and plates, and a lot of other camping items real cheap right after Xmas. Pick up a couple boxes of matches, and hit the discount stores for cheap butane lighters and candles. We used to make camping stoves out of tin cans, wax and cardboard- one big one lasts a weekend.

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Look if you need a good disaster survival kit go here http://www.rockymountainsurvival.com/Disaster_bag.html these are designed by a survival expert who has lived through 3 major disasters including Mt. Saint Helens and has studied disasters for years you won't find a better kit anywhere.

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You can find products for Emergencies Here:
www.EmergencyFood.com
www.Beprepared.com

Both have great products however the Mountain House long shelf life food is back ordered for several weeks.

Luke