questionsare internet companies just asking people to pay…

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TL;DR: Apparently all modems are only capable of 24mbps (or at least that is all I have been able to find) but my DSL internet provider offers speeds up to 40mbps. How does that work? Or have I just not found the specific hardware I need?

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Not too familiar with DSL connections, but I believe DOCSIS 3 modems are capable of pushing 100+Mb easily.

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@lichme: Sounds like that is specific to Cable internet, and not DSL. I would not be surprised if there is a DSL modem capable of doing something similar, but I just can't find one.

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Emailed manufacturer to see what they think. I am confident I am just confused since this seems like a massive flaw in the system that should probably be illegal. 9 times out of 10 that means I am just ill-informed. :(

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Weird... I just spent about 30 minutes looking and couldn't find a single adsl modem that's capable of the speeds the companies advertise. Closest I could find was mentions of a prototype on some forum.

I know that there are lots of issues that make it so you pretty much never reach the maximum advertised speed with dsl, but still very odd that there's seemingly no modem even being sold for them

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@panthiest: Thank you, at least I know I am not insane now.

I am tempted to call my ISP to see if they have an explanation, but I'm worried they are going to feed me a load of bull as that is what ISPs generally do in my experience. I'll wait to see if I can turn up anything from contacting a manufacturer.

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I found a Xytel that would do 40 mbps. There are only a few services that offer this service and (I think) only in very limited areas. Most places DSL caps at 6 mbps, and thus with a relatively low demand the number of potential customers is pretty low.

I'd hate to do it too, but does the provider sell the equipment? Yes, it usually has crap for features, but it will probably work.

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@wilfbrim: Could you provide a link to that modem? Is it something available for sale? I could just talk to my ISP but that is guaranteed to be a massive ripoff. I know they want to charge me at least 100 for a modem/router combined unit which is definitely a ripoff, haven't bothered pursuing just a plain modem from them. Could be worth it, but I have my doubts.

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Ok, somewhat solved. Looks like there is a somewhat new standard called "VDSL2" which is what is being provided by the ISP. Unfortunately I cannot find any commercially available modems for this though. There are a few second hand ones around, but nothing really manufactured for public apparently. So I almost have to go through my ISP.

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You need to find out how far away from the service area you are to even consider paying more for the 40mbps modem. DSL speeds drop quickly the farther away you are, so unless you are right next door the the hub you would be fine with the 24Mbps modems.

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@zapp brannigan: Ya, i noticed that when I was reading up on the standard. I am in a decently big metro area though (practically downtown Minneapolis), so I don't think the 40 would be pushing it. That being said I am not paying for it yet and don't really need it, but I figured since I was planning on a new modem I would at least check out the latest so I dont just end up getting another modem in a couple years. However looking at the complications and the price difference, I will probably opt for the slower modem since I really don't need that speed right now. I guess by the time I need to upgrade there will probably be some other new standard anyway.

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@countdown: Call your DSL people and ask them where the hub is and if it's farther than a half mile to a mile away you will never get even close to 10mbps download. I know future proofing is great (I bought a docsis 3 cable modem a few years ago when it wasn't supported in my area yet) but since dsl is so dependant on distance it's hard to justify the additional cost.

That half mile is half mile of cable not distance by car btw since you will never know how long the cable is between the two points but it's a good estimate to consider if it's farther than that distance you know the cable is atleast that long.

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Just hold out for Google Fiber. If they can manage to hold the costs where they are now (and bring it to my city) it would essentially be a 1000Mb upgrade at no cost, only a measly 280 across the Wifi of course.

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You probably won't notice much of a difference between 25 and 40 anyway unless you are transferring files between locations that all connect to the same telco central office or you are planning on having lots of simultaneous users/applications.

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I agree with you all. Just wanted to be prepared for changing times is all.

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@countdown: I don't see DSL surviving much longer. 4G internet is faster, Verizon has dropped it and it will go the way of dialup pretty soon. The google fiber would be amazing if you live in a major city that will get it.

I wish the government would again spend huge amounts of money and lay fiber in majority of cities, like they did with cable years ago.

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You're probably on VDSL - you're right that ADSL2+ has a speed limit.. Don't buy an ADSL modem if you're in an area serviced by VDSL. Maybe you need to call your ISP to find out.

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@zapp brannigan: 4G is only faster because not everyone is on it. The wireless spectrum simply cannot handle everyone being on it simultaneously for their primary connection. At least not without a tower on every street corner. And if there's wires to every street corner, they might as well run that wire directly to your home.