questionsdoes anyone know a good relatively cheap knife…

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I had a nice set of Henckel knives that got knife-napped.
Spoiled by good knives, I looked for a while.

I found both Kitchen Aid and Cuisinart made a very nice product at a good price. They make several lines. Look for the Pro series, with riveted handles.

I have the cleaver, sharpener, 8" chef, 10" carving, 8" slicing, 6" boning, 8" & 6" Santoku, 3.5" paring & bird's beak plus a 6" serrated knife. Price was about $110 from a kitchen supply and Tuesday Morning.

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I got the Top Chef brand set of knives off Amazon for maybe $55 w shipping a little while ago with some coupons I think. That is pretty much what I got:

http://www.amazon.com/9-Piece-Knife-including-Butchers-Block/dp/B002RL9EU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1321801412&sr=8-1

Maybe black friday deals will get you some nice codes to get the prices down?

I really like the set, I'm by no means a chef but its way better than the cheapy Kitchenaid set of knives I started out with when I first moved out on my own.

To be honest though you probably don't need that many knives, 1 serrated knife (for bread), 1 butcher knife (for cutting meat), 1 Santoku (the one with oval shapes on the sides of the blades for cutting veggies) and 1 paring knife (for cutting small things) and the kitchen scissors. Maybe a fillet knife if you find yourself filleting meats on a regular basis... Otherwise I don't even use the other knives.

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America's Test Kitchen http://www.americastestkitchen.com/ , a cooking show on PBS recommends several knives made by Victorinox in their Fibrox {formerly Victorinox Forschner)line.

I should have read the link provided by @afurball

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@hiiamstevie and @darthemerald:

I do cook more now that I'm retired. Live on a small farm. We process lots of veggies, poultry, venison, etc. I should've said I was looking for durability + a good, hard edge to hold sharpness for hours of cutting. Grip and balance are vital too. I have big hands. When I shopped to replace my Henckel knives, I tried several designs before I found ones that felt right. Always try a knife before you buy. They are built for different users. Get what fits you. I bought most of them individually.

Here's the 3-rivet Cuisinart design I liked (don't see the cleaver here)
http://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-CA-X-3-Piece-Kitchen-Cutlery/dp/B001GMAELQ/ref=sr_1_39?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1321818431&sr=1-39

These KitchenAid triple-rivet knives are close to what I got:
http://www.jcpenney.com/jcp/X6.aspx?GrpTyp=PRD&ItemID=16d82f1

Which are similar to:
http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-3-Piece-Chefs-Rosewood-Handles/dp/B000UVBW9W

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The Victorinox (Forschner) and also Kershaw makes some very good, inexpensive knives. My favorite purveyer of knives is www.gpknives.com

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our gifted henckels are fine[except for the one ruined by ahole knife sharpener at andronico's!] but my fave little paring knives i got at long's drugs ~20years ago, 3 tiny knives for $1--so makes me think good knives don't have to be so pricey[but obviously, larger knives require more $,tech...]. never sharpened but still sharp, while our henckels paring knives are all dull/need sharpening. used daily for paring fruits, vegs.,snacks,cheese... but only 1 left[knife-nappers!], wish i can find online. they say "stainless taiwan" on blade, smooth plastic handle. look like toys, but a tiny knife is very useful!