questionschallenge - use the word 'galore' in a sentence.

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Pussy Galore: My name is Pussy Galore.
James Bond: I must be dreaming.
---Goldfinger (1964)

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@lavikinga at least comment of the week, if not month ... bravo

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Hey dude, you should have been at [insert place here] last night. There were so many women there it was hot chicks galore!

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From Miriam Webster:"with restaurants galore, the city is an epicure's delight".

Of course, if you abhor the word "galore" then chances are poor you'll find a use you'll adore.

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@moondrake: The internet has free dictionaries galore that all come with sample sentences making this a rather pathetic challenge as no one actually has to come up with an original sentence that uses the word galore.

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@lavikinga: Beat me to it. You must watch a galore of Bond films :)

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I don't get exactly why you're having 60s flashbacks, but that's fine.

Let me break down galore for you:

Adverb: In abundance or plenty.
Noun: Abundance or plenty (of something); also in galore.

The adverb form dates back to the middle of the 17th century. The etymology is commonly thought of as Irish but the proximate source was probably Scottish Gaelic. The noun form only dates back to the middle of the 19th century.

In modern usage it's actually mainly used as a post-positive adjective, which may be one reason why you may have an issue with it. Post-positive adjectives are not common in English and tend to be used for archaic words, and actually tend to make even non-archaic words sound archaic. The definition in this form: "in abundance".

I'm guessing the reason it sounds strange is because the usage or sentence is mangled and the word by it's definition and usage needs to be following something properly or it sticks out. The bad grammar you're much more used to.

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On this site you will find deals galore.... on a good day anyway.

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@okham:

OK, exactly what I mean.
"Beat me to it. You must watch a galore of Bond films :)"

You're using the noun form which isn't really in use now, which makes it awkward sounding already. It sounds like you put the word galore in the sentence for the sake of doing it (which you did). Also, I think it's supposed to be "You must watch galore of Bond films", but it's a little hard to check, as almost no current dictionary has it in noun form--I only have a few examples form the 19th century, and as far as I can tell, you're if not resurrecting the form, misusing it.

Try subbing abundance or plenty where you put galore. They aren't words you'd naturally use in that sentence. Any time you want to say "a lot" you don't use plenty or abundance or galore. And vice-versa. They have different meanings and purposes and substituting them for enough other willy-nilly makes whatever you say sound wrong.

It's about intent. Say what you mean, no more, no less.

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@anoted: That's a galore-ious response.

And a garrulous one. :)

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@anoted: On subbing the word "plenty," "You must watch a-plenty of Bond films," or "...Bond films aplenty," really doesn't sound that archaic. I suppose modern usage would have it phrased as "You must watch plenty of Bond films." I think how odd it sounds to the ear depends on the age of the ear as much as how well read the individual. (of course, upon edit, I realize "plenty" isn't a noun in this case either. Dang it.)

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"For me it hearkens back to the peace and love of the 60's." Huh? i was part of the peace and love stuff in the 60's and can't remember even hearing the word "galore" at the time. What is it about that word that brings those images to you?

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Bbbbut... I liked Pussy Galore. Can't we go back to those days?

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@lavikinga: you convinced me on the first post. Bravo!

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@magic cave: not certain. That's just the time period it brings me to. And even back then nobody used it.

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Thanks to all for entertaining my rant.

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This thread has answers galore.

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I like the word....and the 60's.

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It isn't illegal or even unusual to dislike certain words on principle.

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Him: "Is the picture at the right height? Should it be higher?"
Her: "No, it's too high: galore."

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The play, known in Ga. lore as the "Hobnail Boot", was one of the most memorable in school history.

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@lavikinga: If you use a form a word I can only find in the full and unabridged OED where according to it's timeline, no one has used it in your lifetime and it was not a popular usage to begin with, it's going to sound wrong. (Especially when it's used incorrectly). Really, really wrong. Like someone picked up a word and dropped it into a sentence mostly at random.

Though @okahm found redemption through possibly the worst pun (and greatest language abuse) on this page.

The moral of the story is that the grammar police won't always get you. There aren't that many of us, and frankly, we're a bit lazy until someone really pisses us off. But don't mess with the OED. Or anyone who has access to the whole damn thing and will look up a word on a whim if they think it's being abused.

Just because the populace at large constantly destroy language doesn't mean there aren't a few of us left fighting the good fight.

Ironically "Pussy Galore" is actually proper English. Kills me, but it is.

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Of course it is. I'd be willing to bet "Pussy Galore" is flat out popular every where.