questionsdo you consider firearms to be a good investment?

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I love guns. Well kept guns hold their value pretty well, but increases in value are slow, if at all. When the government steps in and bans something (as happened with "assault" weapons), suddenly the value increases because existing guns are grand-fathered as legal (usually). I think guns are a good investment for self protection, but I would look elswhere for a money investment. If the government decides to ban your "investment" then it becomes valuable only to "criminals" and is subject to seizure without compensation (You'll get free health care, though, in prison).

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As @nortonsark says, they tend to hold their value over time (if you buy something decent in the first place). Very few guns achieve collector status, and I don't think you can tell beforehand which ones those will be. Most guns that are collectible were new before most of us were born.

Just buy what works for you, and is a good value. Remember that the best purchase you can make is a decent gun safe (and the only ones that are worth having are those you can anchor to a cement floor, IMNSHO). If it's at all possible, try out the gun you're looking to buy, before you do. Many ranges have used guns that you can rent. The difference in kick can mean the difference between a clean shot, and a sore shoulder (for example).

As I often advise people who are collecting various antiques for their value, as investments: "Just buy the things you love. Don't expect to get rich. Times change."

{Beanie Babies are a good example of a bad investment.}

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Brands that don't hold their value: Jimenez, Jennings, Phoenix. The $100 crap won't hold its value, but that's because it was crap to begin with.

And keep in mind while a gun might hold its value, if you shoot it don't expect to make more than you paid. Unless, of course, you got a really good deal on something someone really wants. Which does happen.

At any rate, buy it to shoot it or buy it to collect it. You can't always get a gun where that allows you to do both. And +1000000 to @shrdlu for trying before you buy.

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Any of the cheaper brands probably won't hold their value and definitely won't make you any money. Like others have said, if you are looking for an investment with a high monetary return guns aren't it.

However, the return on a firearm (if you become familiar with it and carry it with you always) could be your life or the lives of your family/friends.

To me having guns is like any other kind of insurance. I wouldn't drive my car without a spare tire and I wouldn't own a home without fire extinguishers.

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I've never regretted spending money on a gun.

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You CANNOT go wrong investing in a gun (as noted above).

I intend to continue to do so.

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I'll put it this way: I own two guns (rifle and pistol) and they are not for investment reasons.

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YES. They're a great investment. First and foremost because you can't take an investment portfolio to the range and shoot it :)

One of the best investments? Machine guns (Legal, NFA registered "class 3" machine guns).
If you look at the price of something like an M16 or a DIAS or a Thompson. the prices have skyrocketed. The reason for this is a very simple one: There will NEVER be another *legally* produced, publicly transferable machine-gun made in America. EVER. And there hasn't been one since 1986.
(This may sound a little surprising to anybody that doesn't know much about guns, but machine guns are completely legal with the right paperwork and enough money)

The initial investment will be a few grand minimum, plus $200 for the transfer. The best "beginner" NFA machinegun is probably something like a Mac-10 or an M11. They run around $4,000 for "new in box" ones. They're good because they can be converted to tons of different calibers (like 22lr) so shooting is cheaper.

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[cont] Since there hasn't been any transferable machineguns made for a few decades and never will be again, the price only goes up, especially as they become more scarce and the cost of firearms overall increases.

My next choice would be rare/unique/niche guns. A good example being something like the Mateba Auto-Revolver..

Check out this guys channel, pretty much EVERY gun he has is an "investment gun"
Here are a few of my favorites and a few great examples (YouTube videos):
1. One of the most valuable Mateba's
2. A Magazine fed revolver
3. Mateba Auto-Revolver
4. A ROCKET gun :)

Those are the kinds of guns most anybody can appreciate, they're just good examples of oddball engineering and creative machines

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I sure hope so, because that's where most of our savings is (half joking). I am not really well versed in guns, but my husband is and I pay attention to what he does. Where he manages to do well is when he gets used guns at a good price well under face value and eventually resells or trades up for something of higher value when he is no longer interested in it or wants something better.

Another note - be wary of gun shows. They used to be a good place to pick up deals, but now we are seeing guns very marked up, much higher than you can get them at your neighborhood sporting goods store not on sale. Be sure you know your prices when you buy and you should be able to at least keep your value or do better.

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@mkdr: That's good advice about gunshows. Deals CAN be had at gun shows, but they're only about 15% "deals" and the rest "other" heh
Gun Shows have become a place for dishonest vendors to take advantage of people from out of town (they usually move around). Like myself for example lol.. in my case, the guy actually lied about the CHAMBERING of the gun. Which is not only a dUck thing to do, but crazy dangerous.

GunBroker is not a place I would trust either, because if you get ripped off you're basically SOL with not much recourse outside of court. I've still used it though :)

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I don't see guns as investments, but rather insurance protecting my investments. Nothing scares someone robbing your house like the sound of the hammer being pulled back on a revolver.

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antique guns, yes. Current models, maybe. Depends on the price, the scarcity, and what gun control laws get passed in the future. Many gun control restrictions end up grandfathering in weapons that they ban, so all of a sudden that firearm shoots up in value.

As an example, when california first outlawed magazines over 10 rounds, my 2 15-round glock magazines became worth almost as much as the handgun itself.

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Guns are no different than other collectibles. The key to increased value over time is a corresponding low or limited production number of the collectible in question. The more that were mass produced, obviously the less they will appreciate. If you are looking to guns as an investment, the first and most important step is self education on the history of firearms. If you are serous about investment, then do NOT fall in love with what you collect. I learned this from years of selling high $$ rare and collectible guitars.

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My problem is, I've yet to sell a gun once I've acquired it. So, despite value, I'd just have a beautiful collection of guns that I wouldn't ever sell.

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@hodakaroadtoad: I have that same "problem" I buy but never sell, I still have every gun I have ever purchased. I'd buy a bigger safe before I sold one (at this point in my life)

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@disturbed0ne: Or you shoot somebody famous with it. That will increase its value. Just a little black humor, I'm certainly not serious. The first thought that hit me when I read your post about shooting it devaluing a gun were those collectors that buy crime memorabilia.

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@moondrake: :O
Are you suggesting we shoot somebody famous of african-american heritage with your "BLACK HUMOR" comment???? I'm shocked!
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lol, just kidding!