questionscan i mix halogen and led bulbs in the same track…

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Yes, you can mix halogen and LED bulbs on the same track. Actually, both types should be compatible with a dimmer. You run into problems with dimmers primarily with the fluorescent bulbs.

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@nortonsark: Thanks. I thought that the dimmers for LED and Halogen were different. And unless you spend a ton on a dimmer (which I'm not going to do) most of them are pretty bad when you look at reviews.

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@minkeygirl7: If you move to LED for energy savings, then you should try to get a good dimmer - a true potentiometer type. Many dimmers are resistor style, which converts the electricity flowing through it very effectively into heat, but doesn't save on the bills as much as an actual potentiometer type.

At the high end of the spectrum, a digital poteniometer dimmer will work well for your led's, and also work well for anything else dimmable. Be aware that your halogens and led's will dim at different rates - i wouldn't mix them on the same dimmer, frankly. electricity, like air and watrer, will choose the easiest path, which would be your led bulbs. Led bulbs aren't cheap, and even though they'd likely be fine - their one enemy is heat, and heat is the exact byproduct of resistance.

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Short answer? Maybe. Dimming LED's is a complex topic, and success depends on the mix of dimmer and LED driver. Throwing a halogen load into the mix may or may not change any of that. Long answer:

http://www.lutron.com/en-US/Education-Training/Documents/LCE/LightSources/LED/Dimming%20LEDs%20-%20LFI_2012_v1.01.pdf

I'll note that we have a whole house Lutron system but only have one light that is 120V LED and on a Lutron dimmer. It does work perfectly from 0 to 100% but I can't recall the make of the LED and it requires a ladder to go check, so you're out of luck for the moment in that regard...

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to add to that, i've found that the philips bulbs (the amber incandescent replacements, as well as the high hats) are excellent dimmers.

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@goatcrapp: What language are you speaking? LOL? I want to slowly switch to LED when I can afford the bulbs (should give you a clue about my financial situation) mostly for the heat factor and then get a basic dimmer for no other reason than to dim the lights over my kitchen counter. The lights won't be on that long so I guess I misspoke some about the utility cost.

I bought a 9W bulb to see how I like it brightness wise then I can move on from there.

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I've had some LEDs that aren't "compatible" with a dimmer. Those usually just turn off instead of dimming. But, to answer your original question -- I have them mixed in plenty of fixtures, as I'm slowly switching from halogen to LED.

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@caver2130: Thanks caver2130. I'm slowly switching too. I bought a 9W so I'll see how it goes. If I like that I may not need a dimmer.

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I've had nothing but failures with Philips Edison-base LEDs. 40+ in my house have died since January (I'm an electrician, pretty sure nothing wrong with the power in my house). The standard "2-prong" 24-volt Philips are fine, though.

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Oh, and not all LEDs can be dimmed, even with pulse-width modulation, depending on how the LED is set up. The simpler the LED array (if there is an array in the bulb) the better.
like, 12 LEDs with 2.1v reverse bias soldered in series inside the bulb could probably be dimmed, but a 120-to-24 volt LED bulb with a driver and a dc-dc converter inside may not be able to be dimmed at all.
Resistive dimmers WILL destroy most types, because ohm's law dictates power regulation, volts = amps * resistance. Any load will try and draw what its rating (in watts) is, and if the resistance is raised/lowered, the amps will inversely lower/raise, which doesnt do good with electronics and solder joints in htese devices, already running hot.