questionswhat is the best track system for hot wheels cars?

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I have noticed that a lot of the pre-destined kits available today seem to lack in quality of what they were 25 years ago when I took up the hobby as a kid, no doubt due to the higher cost of production and labor nowadays. They do sell individual "pieces" that are higher quality though and they're not too badly priced either. They are available at most Kmart and Walmart stores for a few bucks. Also, you can buy loops, ramps and landing zones for individual sale as well. Due to lack of quality, however, I suggest vintage parts on Ebay.

As a side note, I was doing new siding on my house a few years ago and my son claimed a piece of soffiting for his cars as a simple ramp. He still has it in his closet and still plays with it from time to time. It actually works great, but has 3 slots instead of one and is MUCH more durable than anything Hotwheels has ever produced.

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After reading this it made me miss doing that kind of fun stuff so I watched the video for the Criss Croos Crash and it only comes with 1 car!!!! I feel horrible for the child that get's that for there Birthday or other celebration. Comone Hot wheels at least put 2 cars in the combo.

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The toy biz is a small world, so I've known a few folks from the Hot Wheels and Matchbox teams at Mattel. It's a wide-open secret that the track sets are crap. Yeah, you just spent $50 or $100 on the Holiday Big Wow... and you got a big cardboard box with a bunch of crap inside that may or may not assemble (because there really wasn't time to test the thing for fit & function before it had to go to tooling).

If you really want something that works, look to Darda (dist. in the USA by Schylling, you can find 'em now on Amazon or probably during 4th quarter in Target, maybe Toys R Us). The stuff ain't foolproof, and it's more of a Matchbox vibe than Hot Wheels, but it generally works with some tweaking and isn't THAT much more expensive.

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classic orange hot wheels tracks from the 70's where you had the screw-on clamp that you'd attach to the table or counter. Add a loop or two, a jump or two, and a few banked turns and you were happy for days.

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My tracks from the Late-80's to Late-90's seemed to be of decent quality. I still own them, though haven't played with them for at least 10 years. have they really gone that bad in 10 years? last time i looked at them in stores (2-3 weeks ago, now i "collect") the track looked identical to what i had as a kid.

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When I was younger my parents got me a track set and for the life of me I can not remember the brands. The cars were slightly larger than your standard Hot Wheels car. The tracks consisted of a bunch of pieces of various colors you could put together a variety of ways. We got a decent sized box that had directions for numerous layouts as well as advice on experimenting new tracks. The cars could be wound up by pulling them in reverse to store up energy - gravity was not required as on most Hot Wheel sets.

I think entry cost was not too expensive - more than a random hot wheels track but would not break the bank. However, you had the options to buy a lot more and better/custom cars etc.

It was pretty serious, may have been European.

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@wootbretz: Darda is the brand. More expensive, but higher quality and greater variety of design.