questionsa lesson in bedding

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Sateen is a weave, not a fiber. It is a certain weave of natural fibers and cotton and should never be confused with silk. Sateen sheets are produced in a unique four-threads-over-one-thread method of weaving, which gives these bed sheets their special luster.

Satin is also a weave, not a fiber. Satin is woven of wool, cottons, acetate, polyester, silk or other materials. All weaves of satin bed sheets are extremely smooth and sleek.

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Italian linen is a luxurious fabric made only in Italy from the long-staple luxury cotton which is grown exclusively in Egypt. The lustrous cotton and the processes used in Italy to create the fabric are so high quality that bed sheets of this material are truly luxury items.

Percale is a combed and close-woven cloth of either cotton-polyester blends or 100-percent cotton. It is finer and softer than muslin and generally has a thread count of 180 to 200. Because of their polyester blend, percale sheets have a very low wrinkle factor.

Pima cotton bed sheets have a silky, soft feeling. It is grown only in Australia, Peru and in the United States in Pima, Arizona. "Supima" is a trademarked name for 100-percent pima cotton which has been grown in America. The term means "Superior pima." Pima cotton sheets usually have a thread count of 200 to 300

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Silk fiber sheets are known to be more desirable and luxurious than any other sheets. Silk threads are longer than any other because each single fiber of the silkworm cocoon, unwound, can reach 1600 feet. This makes silk fibers very delicate and extremely strong. Silk fabric is not graded by thread count (TC), but by "momme weight" (its weight in pounds). The standard is a piece of silk 45 inches by 100 yards. Two ounces per linear yard equals 12.5 "momme weight" (pronounced mom-ee). The higher the momme weight, the more silk that is used in weaving. Garments are usually made from 8--12 momme, while silk bed sheets usually have a heavier 16--19 momme weight. Silk is versatile and elegant, and is the only fabric we use that has a history going back more than three thousand years

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Bamboo is a renewable resource new on the market. Bamboo is one of the softest fabrics in the world — softer than cotton but with a drape like silk. It comes from a rapidly renewable resource that doesn't require pesticides to grow.

Muslin is cotton which is rougher yet tougher than others. Muslin is frequently used in children's bedding, and printed with shapes or figures. During washing this fabric tends to "pill" and fade more than other bed sheets. The thread count varies from 128 to 140. Refer to the "Common sheets questions" section of this sheets buying guide for more information about "pilling."

Combed cotton is cotton which has gone through a process to remove shorter fibers and any impurities in the material, which creates a smooth, soft fabric.

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@hobbit: You just came back from the cotton convention in New Orleans? You are a compulsive bed linen buyer? You are naturally smarter than the average bear? This is a great primer - thank you!

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@hobbit: maybe we could trade the magic seeds for a cow?

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@faughtey: I started reading it for that reason. I still haven't gotten to that point. When do you think it will come up.

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Oh yes and this link: http://deals.woot.com/deals/details/51f53201-c790-4d9e-afc7-fbf394f97ed7/luxury-manor-800-thread-count-cotton-sheet-set#20 which has a lot of useful discussion about thread count and this great video link that wootvan provided.

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@sand4me: No I really found all of it on Overstock, except the bit about Bamboo I had to google that. Although I will say I am not sold on Bamboo products. I have tested some items for the running store i work for and they were okay, but I prefer the old school stuff. I haven't bought any Bamboo linens yet they are also more expensive than cotton, which considering their renewableness you think they would be cheaper. I know bamboo flooring is awesome and great to have, but also expensive.

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Dang, this gets the cool factor vote from me. Thank you. Sure, this was available somewhere else, but here it is, all in one nice neat place, where I'm most likely to want it.

@hobbit +++

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Arizona actually grows a few types of cotton. Egyptian cotton thrives there. Here's an interesting article: http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/arizonaliving/articles/2008/12/06/20081206cotton1206.html

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@sgoman5674: Hopefully soon, it's a worthy topic!

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@hobbit: We're part of the woot staff in the comedic relief department.

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@fenstar: it is still a much more renewable resource than others. Bamboo grows faster and in more abundance than Cotton, in the South I think if some of us residents could figure out how to harvest it we would be doing so because other misguided home owners planted it as screening and now it is taking over the landscape like a weed and we aren't doing anything to promote its growth it just grows and at several inches a week.

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@snapster: funny. But again I am still not sold on bamboo products yet, as I said earlier. And the plant is just awful, it spreads like wildfire down here in the South East, it might actually over take Kudzu.

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@hobbit: You are correct. Bamboo is evil, like kudzu, or pampas grass, which is very pretty, and busily crowding out everything in the Angeles Crest and Santa Monica mountains. Hemp is green. Bamboo is about as green as using corn to make ethanol (greater energy investment to create it than you get from it). Argh. Don't get me started. Oh. Too late.

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Thanks for posting that, Hobbit, but they got a bit of it wrong. These two parts:
*
Italian linen is a luxurious fabric made only in Italy from the long-staple luxury cotton which is grown exclusively in Egypt. The lustrous cotton and the processes used in Italy to create the fabric are so high quality that bed sheets of this material are truly luxury items.
*

Sateen is a weave, not a fiber. It is a certain weave of natural fibers and cotton and should never be confused
Silk is versatile and elegant, and is the only fabric we use that has a history going back more than three thousand years
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True linen is actually made from the flax plant. It is not cotton, it is flax. Also, silk is not the only fabric with a history dating back over 3000 years, linen also dates back well over 3000 years. Tombs of the pharaohs have been open and the linens used to wrap them were still in excellent condition. Some details:
http://www.ulsterlinen.com/2.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linen

HTH

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This is great! Thanks for putting it all together on one page. I should have known this was not about tips on carnal knowledge. wink

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you two are disgusting, in a funny way.

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I've read stuff that says most bamboo ISN'T green because of how they harvest it, all the chemicals the put in it when use as flooring.

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I went home over New Years and my parents had some 1000 count sheets. They were absolutely amazing.

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Re: bamboo sheets, usually once a year or so you can find bamboo sheet sets at Target. The first year they sold them, I bought a set and absolutely loved them. I believe they were 100% bamboo (I don't have them anymore). Then for a while they went away from stores, and when they came back, they're now a blend of bamboo and cotton, I think (80% bamboo, 20% cotton IIRC). Not quite as soft as the 100% bamboo sheets, but still nice. The 100% sheets seem to hold color better. I have a set of the 80/20 sheets, & used Spray & Wash on the pillowcases & it bleached the color out. So take care when using spray treatments for stains!

But they are very soft, they have a smooth feel but also kind of like a brushed cotton softness to them. And with every washing they get softer, IMO.

Just my bamboo sheet 2 cents worth. :) (I'd supply a link to Target with an example, but they don't appear to be selling them currently, they must be out of season).