questionsdo you cook and eat at home (or someone's home…

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I cook at eat at home. I can say from experience that it really sucks for people who have to work on Thanksgiving. The cooks and servers often don't want to be there. It's their bosses (who almost always take the holiday off, the jerks) who force them to work.

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@thumperchick: I am cognizant of that argument. But I also take into account that for a lot of people in food service, a day off is a day without pay. Many local business only let their employees have 25 hours a week, which means no paid holidays, sick leave or vacation. I remember when I was working as a temp and was in the same boat. I actually implored my boss to let me work on the holidays so I could make my rent in December and January. So I don't feel bad patronizing businesses because I know for many of the workers the business being open on holidays means they can do more for their families and actually enjoy their own holidays without worrying about losing half a week's pay.

Hm, I just got am email from a golf club for their Thanksgiving lunch. It includes turkey, ham, turducken and all the expected sides. It's pricey ($26) but we may have found our place.

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I have always cooked at home. usually I have a house full of friends (my family is about 650 miles away). But this year it is just me and my best friend, and we are talking about going to a restaurant. We haven't seen any really good discounts on turkeys this year, so it would probably cost us about $50 to make the meal, and then we'd be stuck with sinks full of dirty dishes and a huge amount of leftovers. So we are talking about going out to a restaurant for the meal, and then relaxing at home with coffee and desserts. We haven't decided yet, as we are looking for someplace nice. There are a couple of buffets we can rely on to have good traditional holiday food, but the ambiance is lacking. So we are keeping an eye out for any of the nicer restaurants that might be catering to the holiday diners. We may compromise and buy a prepared turkey meal from one of the groceries. But he doesn't like breast meat, and dinners with whole turkeys are expensive, plus too many leftovers.

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as an extra note to my question, I do have the turkey in the freezer and will pick up all the rest of the fixin's and do my own big Thanksgivign Dinner at home later that weekend

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We either cook at home or travel to someone else's to eat...normally they come to us.

We've done the out to eat thing - only problem is no leftovers...I love leftover turkey.

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@moondrake: Turducken! Yes, that is your place.

We host Thanksgiving at our house now, after many years of my parents having it. We're not a terribly large family, so it is not a huge undertaking. I wouldn't have it any other way.

One year I was on vacation with friends over the Thanksgiving holiday, so we had our meal at a restaurant. I felt like I really missed out that year. Yes, I missed the foods that we always have, but mostly I missed spending the day with the family. It's a long day of togetherness (which I get, maybe some families don't want) -- cooking, cleaning, watching football, playing games, etc. That's the stuff that you'll miss out on when meeting at a restaurant.

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I eat at my dad's girlfriends, and have for the past 15 or so years. Before that, we'd always have the whole family over to our house. Some years, with going to my dads, I've also gone to my cousins house, and then sometimes another cousins house as well!

My mom tends to make Thanksgiving dinner for us and maybe a friend or two on Saturday, but this year it may be Wednesday.

This year, it's just my moms and my dads dinners at least, I didn't mind going multiple places for Thanksgiving until everyone expected me to eat! I'd eat myself sick 95% of the time!

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Dinner is at the in-laws, before that it was at mom's. I cook a lil somethin' for both. While I understand people wanting to share a meal and not the massive cleanup duties, I believe people in food-service should get a day off too.

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Last year a group of us ended up being in the entirely too exhausted/busy/etc. to shop and cook camp, so we went out. Not really my preference, but at the time it made perfect sense for everybody. And a few of us went to the movies afterward.

I like the home cooking element. It's not often I get a whole day to cook and laze about, so I take advantage of that when I can.

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We've cooked at my house for about 8 or 9 years now. Before that, we'd go to some other family member's house. Never been to a restaurant for Thanksgiving.

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I've done Thanksgiving with families (both my own and other people's) and in restaurants over the years. I greatly prefer being in someone's home. For the past five years or so I've done Thanksgiving with some friends, their family and sometimes other people they have invited. I started doing that because it didn't make sense to travel to be with my family for various reasons. And, now, it's just come to make a lot more sense to spend more time with my family over Christmas and not travel when the rest of the country seems to be trying to fly somewhere. So I bring pies and grumble a bit when I get stuck at the adult table rather than with the "kids" (some of whom have their own kids now) and the nephews ask if I'm going to be there, partly because they want to see me and partly (mostly?) because I bring pies. And it's a lot of fun. I do miss being with my family some, but we talk on the phone and I try to visit earlier in the fall and it all works out fairly well.

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@inkycatz: I took advantage last year of having to do nothing other than show up at a certain time to take the family to a movie before Thanksgiving Dinner, still would have rather had a home cooked meal and it is a point I have learned to not bring up in front of Mrs Natedogg828 anymore

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@natedogg828: That's a good plan (the later Thanksgiving dinner at home). We've done that before, too. I am always grateful when we go to my inlaws and they cook dinner, but lord, the things those people do to poor innocent sweet potatoes. Sometimes it's nice to get your own version later.

This year we're at home and the inlaws are coming. I have a 5K in the morning, so I'm going to try to get most of the prep work done the night before.

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@mtm2: Yeah, there is something magical about holiday leftovers.

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@inkycatz: my problem is I brought it up twice, you would think after 15 years of marriage I would know better

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I have about 30 -35 people every year. Two turkeys, 20lbs mashed potatos, 10 lbs. sweet potato, corn, corn bread, salad and pies. I make all bu the pies and love every minute of it.

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Cooked at Home. Always. I have never not cooked a holiday meal. 40+ years. We have had the traditional meal postponed a time or two for loved ones to get out of the hospital, but we still do it.

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Home (someone else's, thankfully). I've never been to a restaurant on Thanksgiving Day.

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Eat at home or my parent's house.

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I've done both. While almost always I stay home (or somebody else's) a few times I've gone to a nice resturant. One time in particular in NC was very nice. This year I'm splitting the difference: I'm alone so I'll get a partially cooked dinner from Whole Foods, and finish it myself. Some years I did the whole thing myself, but that was when I had 3 dogs. They appreciated all the food.