questionsanyone have advice on using a dremmel to trim dog…

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Initally, don't do it. Your dog yelps because you've hit the quick, which is the nerve-rich live part of the nail. Secondly, if you're going to keep doing this, be sure you have a styptic pencil or two. If you cut into the quick more deeply than you have thus far, you're going to be really surprised at the amount of bleeding you get and how long it takes to get it to stop.

As an alternative, check here for info on making a doggie nail file that dogs themselves use: http://shirleychong.com/keepers/nailfile.html. Shirley was a professional dog trainer for many years and really knows her stuff. You might take note of the last paragraph of the article.

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You really need to be careful with something like this. I actually bought one of those commercial dog trimming dremmel thing (Pedipaws or something?) but I remember that you had to slowly introduce something like this to a dog. The noise and grinding pressure can freak out the dog, so they say to introduce the noise first but just turning it on near the dog and then comforting the dog if he is uncomfortable (treats, petting, comforting remarks, etc). Then after he/she is comfortable with the noise, introduce the pressure by actually using it, but just briefly (comfort again while doing this until the dog calms down). Then once you have done this you can start actually using it to trim the nails, but you really need to be careful because you cant do it too hard or for too long because the pressure can actually hurt them and if you do it for too long it gets super hot. There are nerve endings in the nails!

Found this:
http://homepages.udayton.edu/~jmerenski1/doberdawn/dremel/dremel.html

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Not to!!! First, for the mere fact that dog senses are more acute than ours. That high pitch wining from the Dremmel and other sanding devices is ear splitting for a dog. Second, dogs rely on their pads of their feet for their sense of touch, and the vibration from the device is un-nerving to them. Our vet said that subjecting a dog to a Dremmel or other sanding device is like getting a guys ball hairs pulled out one by one.

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I think the sanding rotary tools should only be used to clean up the nails after cutting with a quality nail trimmer. The only way that using a rotary tool would seem to be a good solution is if you're doing it weekly and only using it to maintain length, as opposed to actually trying to do any significant cutting.

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i've found that my belt sander does a great job of cleaning em right on up

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@pinchecat: That of course opens up an entirely new line of inquiry: what's the best way to clean up the walls and ceiling after using a belt sander to clean up the dogs nails?

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When you say "Dremmel" I'm assuming you mean a good ol' fashion, straight up grinding wheel..

If you're gonna go that route, I'd say try one of these:
AS SEEN ON TV! PediPaw
Actually.. I'm gonna go add this as a deal brb - okay deal! Wow.. these were $20 bucks not too long ago.. only $3.47 now.

Basically the same thing, just specially designed for that application..

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@pinchecat: I have to restrain the dogs, but my angle grinder makes really quick work of trimming their nails.

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My advice - go to a quality pet shop and purchase a high-quality nail clipper. If the dog has black nails, of course you cannot see the quick, in which case you should err on the longer side. If you can see the quick, then a quick snip on each toe does the trick. Otherwise, the poor animal is subjected to all of the noise and tauma described by other posters here. My dog groomer comes to my homw to beautify the mutt, and I am sure she would be absolutely horrified by what you are describing.

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We used a PediPaws until it died, then went to the rotary tool(Dremel) at the lowest possible speed to avoid overheating the nail. Heat, more than the quick, should be your focus. Any doubt in your mind, do your own toe nails. You'll be surprised at the heat generated by grinding.
Further, I also use the bench mount and the flexible extension so that the motor is farther away from the dog. She was apprehensive at first, but now doesn't mind it at all.

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Actually Dremel makes a tool for just that purpose.

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My mother owns a pet salon. She loathes PediPaws haha.

Her advice when owners want to cut their dog's nails, "cut short". If the dog is comfortable, just take the tips off. I agree with @klozitshoper - buy a quality pair of clippers. She gave us these http://www.petedge.com/product/Master-Grooming-Tools-Ergonomic-Professional-Nail-Clippers/44178.uts#prod-backorder

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Came in late. If the dog has dark nails, I recommend this type of product, http://www.orvis.com/store/product.aspx?pf_id=3H7P&adv=12082&cm_mmc=FroogleProd_feedsProd_feeds*12082&CAWELAID=1019225019 It literally gives you a green light when you aren't on the quick. I have not tried it, myself, but my friend likes hers.

Also, if you don't know the peanut butter trick, it is a great method for most dogs, at least those who like peanut butter. Put a smear of peanut butter on a smooth, clean, immovable object. ((Many use the fridge, I don't judge) While the dog licks the peanut butter off, you can usually have your way with the nails. We use a similar method with our ferrets, we put a blob of ferreitone (treat) on the belly, they lean in to lick it off, paws just hang to the side. Before they know it nails are trimmed. I have personally cut over 27 ferrets nails with this method, in an afternoon, at the rescue.

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I am a veterinarian and love Dremel tools for doing dog nails. I prefer the Dremel Stylus because it has a pistol grip and fits the hand very comfortably. It is amazingly powerful for a battery tool. Use the sanding drum, not the grind stones. Just because a dog yelps does not mean you have quicked it. They can feel the heat from the grinding and that bothers some of them. If the nails are really long, you may be forced to quick them slightly just to get close to the correct length. The heat generated actually controls most of the bleeding. If you are taking 15 minutes to do the job you really are not applying enough pressure. You really should be able to get the job done in one minute per foot or less. For dogs that struggle, hanging them in a vest helps a lot. I use a professional grooming vest and hanging bar. You could rig the same thing with a pillow case or sheet with 4 leg holes and hang from a door jam. Suspending the dog gives you a lot more control but some still fight.

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One other tip. Whether you are grinding or clipping nails on a dog, always, always, always start with the back feet. The dog will be more cooperative with the rear feet and when you do get to the front the job is half done and they are somewhat acclimated to the process.

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My groomer charges only $10 to do my Great Dane's nails once a month and I like having it done there because it's good socialization. He's always preferred the grinder over the clipper because his nails are so heavy and thick that it takes a lot of pressure to clip them. They just have to be very careful not to let the nails overheat, they have to switch back and forth between his toes and go back to the same nail 3-4 times before it is done to let it cool down between bursts of grinding. That's the main trick, don't put speed or efficiency over the dog's comfort in this task.

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@nortonsark: Thank you! I agree with you about the heat. I don't believe I have ever hit the quick because a) she has clear nails and I can see the quick, b) I've never drawn blood, and c) the groomer has cut her nails way shorter than I ever have. And I also agree that it is taking me too long because I'm not using enough pressure, but I worry about the heat.

I cycle through the nails on each paw so as not to spend too much time on each and over-heat. When the groomer did it, she was fast and I'm sure she was more comfortable with applying the right pressure and that is what I'm looking for in the way of tips to find the right technique.

To all the nay-sayers - I had a lab with black nails who wouldn't go for it and I let a professional do it so as not to traumatize him or me, but my fearless little Boston Terrier does not mind and actually starts to fall asleep during the process. She does not yelp every time, but did yesterday so I wanted to see how I could improve the process.

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@mikecris: Is it possible it wasn't the nail she was yelping about but maybe you accidentally twisted her toe, foot, or shoulder? Because it sounds like you are doing the grinding properly.

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@moondrake: I always have her laying in a natural position with my girlfriend holding her steady, so I don't think she's been twisted, etc. I may have hit her pad by accident since her paws are small, but I'm leaning more towards the nail over-heating. Maybe I have the setting too high? I use it at about half speed.