questionsanyone have experience with magnetic primer?

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I know nothing about magnetic primer, but I do know that if your fridge is stainless steel then magnets damn well better stick to it or someone has gone and messed with the physics of the universe in your neighborhood.

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@durkzilla: I was thinking the same thing - magnets should work on stainless steel. But I have been wrong before!

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@durkzilla: Stainless steel is non-ferrous so it is non-magnetic. The "steel" in "stainless steel" is confusing. Same with brass...it is non-ferrous. That is why stainless steel/brass are used for wet applications such as swimming pools. Try it yourself with a stainless steel screw and a magnet.

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@durkzilla: To expand on what jsimsace said, some stainless steel is magnetic, but most is not. The type that's used in most refrigerators and other decorative applications is often 436, which is non-magnetic. If you have a stainless steel fridge that is magnetic, it is actually a lower grade stainless that will most likely dull within a few years. The only spots on my fridge that are magnetic are the painted sides and the areas where there is steel reinforcement behind the stainless. I use stainless steel in a lot of applications at work, and the magnet test is usually the easiest way to identify a material.

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@jsimsace: Man, you are quick!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel

While stainless steel has iron in it, the amount of chromium and other elements in the mix thin out the amount of iron, and it's the iron that is what the magnet clings to. It isn't non-ferrous, as far as I know, but has far less iron than other types of steel.

One of the better Wikipedia articles. Well worth reading.

[Edit] I love magnets. Best part about disassembling the old monster SCSI disk drives was the giant magnets.

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@jeffrjohn: Sorry about getting off the question, I have never used the primer, but I think you are on the right track. From reviews I have read, it's not good for much more than a paperclip or other light items.

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@shrdlu: That's what my wife tells me occasionally. :>(

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I tried the magnetic paint on one of the kitchen walls for the same reason (stainless steel fridges aren't magnetic). I ended up putting 9 coats of the primer on in order to get normal(not rare earth magnets) magnets to stick with paper behind them. you can actually see the bulge in the wall from all the paint. Overall I would have been better off putting a steel plate on the wall and painting over that. The magnetic paint is good in theory but not in practice.

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@ropes: I was thinking the same thing after I read posts stating that stainless steel isn't magnetic. Just mount a steel plate on the wall, forget about the fridge, forget about redoing the cabinets with something that may or may not work!

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Tape, dude. Just buy some tape.

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@sskarstad: The cabinets were a glass face and we were taping to them. The problem with tape is that it can be a pain to get off sometimes if it's been hanging there and after a while the cabinet looks like junk with bits of tape everywhere and can peel the paint if stuck there. The plan was to remove the glass anyway because no one needs to see the shelves of Buzz Lightyear sippy cups and Cars plastic plates that fill my kitchen these days. So, if they were going to be refinished, I wanted a clean way of going about hanging things. I thought hard about putting metal panels in the cabinets, but decided against it because it was going to be a pain to get them cut to the exact size and I had concerns about getting pain to stick to them over time. Wood panel seemed like the right option and with 3 coats of primer, they work OK. I'm just wondering if that is the best I can expect or if adding more primer will give me a better performance.

In short, tape isn't my best option.

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@ropes: Once I did the trial run with 3 coats, I knew regular magnets weren't going to work out. So, I went online and bought 100 rare earth magnets. They stick for some stuff, but the thicker or heavier items don't work too well. If 9 coats did it for you with regular, then maybe I'll try 5 or 6 with the rare earth magnets. Thanks.

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@jsimsace @jeffrjohn: Thanks for the education - my "stainless" appliances are magnetic. I can check off the "learned something new" box for today.