questionswhat is your favorite book series?

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my favorite series is the Uncle John Bathroom Readers. they have lots of information. it's all factual. there are shorts, longs, multiparts sections, and stuff no one ever thought would be usefull to know

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I love science fiction and there are so many good series out there. If you want a nice, long series, well, the Honor Harrington series by David Weber is very nice. Anything by David Drake or John Ringo, they have written a few many different series, all are good. For Fantasy Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar series can't be beat.

If you prefer historical fiction I am now rereading, actually listening since I have the books on CD, the Aubrey-Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian. It is about the British Navy around the time of Napoleon. Great read.

If you want more suggestions some input on what you like to read would be helpful.

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I've always liked the "Prey" series from John Sandford.

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@jsimsace: I prefer the Virgil Flowers books by John Sandford.

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The Hunger Games. The third book wasn't as good as the first two though.

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My 2 favorite series would be Asimov's Foundation series and Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern.

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I second The Hunger Games, however I really like the third book. Also The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo trilogy was really good and suspenseful.

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My favorite series is Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game Quartet (I'm thinking of the original four books), closely followed by Card's Ender's Shadow quartet (again, the first four). At different points in my life, I've preferred one series over the other; perhaps it's time to revisit all of them again!

As a teenager, my favorite series was probably Card's Homecoming series, although it did not retain its appeal the last time that I revisited it. As a child - I'm not sure if Laura Ingalls Wilder's books count as a "series," per se, but they're certainly a set.

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Lord of the Rings. Hands down the best series I've ever read, if you count it as a series. If not, I like Harry Potter well enough to make it my favorite book series, then.

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The Bible, but like a Stephen King novel, the ending is disappointing, and over the top.

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Uglies series, by Scott Westerfeld. Highly, highly recommended to Hunger Games fans-- A similar vibe but I think a much more interesting story, personally.

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I like the "Sigma" series by James Rollins. New one coming out in June, so I'm kind of excited.

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@neuropsychosocial: The books on tape are amazing. I spent about 3 months worth of commuting listening to all of these.

If you like sort of campy vampire/supernatural stuff, I love Kim Harrison's "The Hollows" series, closly followed by Ilona Andrews "Kate Daniels" series.

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I enjoyed Thrawn trilogy and Hand of Thrawn duology by Timothy Zahn. I also liked the Drizzt Do'Urden novels by R.A. Salvatore, although I have fallen badly behind on those.

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I'll pick up and read just about anything by Larry Niven. While it's not really a series per se, his "Known Space" universe includes a variety of interesting concepts, settings and characters, and is also roomy enough for guest authors to play around in (see the Man-Kzin Wars). Lately I've been especially digging the Fleet of Worlds sub-series co-written with Edward M. Lerner, but if you're unfamiliar with Known Space to begin with, I wouldn't recommend starting there.

On the other end of the spectrum, I also read a lot of historical mysteries, and the top of that heap for me is Lindsey Davis' series featuring the first-century Roman "private informer," Marcus Didius Falco. Start at the beginning with "Silver Pigs." The series shuttles Falco basically across the whole Roman empire--but in a way that doesn't strain credulity. Humorous, gritty, engaging, kind of what you'd expect if Sam Spade lived in Vespasian's time.