questionswhat is the best dust removal method?

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I was thinking of moving, but with the housing market being what it is that isn't a good answer. I am hoping that you get some helpful responses, that I am also able to use.
Good question, & love the "frust" term!

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A vaccuum and Swiffer dusters will pick up most dust, not just redistribute it.

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Best way is to reduce the airborne dust. I have had one of these (earlier model) for a few years:

http://www.amazon.com/Friedrich-C-90B-Air-Cleaner/dp/B000GZ4FLO

But there are less expensive, and more expensive options out there.

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@josefresno: I agree with this, completely. I bought a 3M one from Woot in 2008, and haul it out every Spring (I put it away in the late Fall). I don't go in and out as much in the Winter, and have less issues with dust then.

http://www.woot.com/Blog/ViewEntry.aspx?Id=5025

It's one of my favorite Woot purchases.

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I have a whole house Hepa air cleaner (Aprilaire 2200) on my heat pump. In my bedroom I have a Whirlpool Hepa air cleaner (AP450). Needless to say, I still have dust. For my hardwood floors and tile, I rotate between a microfiber mop with a big head and an Electrolux vacuum cleaner with a special hardwood floor attachment. For the carpet, I use a Kenmore Progressive upright Hepa vacuum cleaner. For TV screens and electronics, I use a soft microfiber cloth. My TVs came with one and so did my laptop. For regular dusting, I rotate between Swiffer dusters and a heavier microfiber cleaning cloth sprayed with a small amount of Pledge Clean & Dust. After using the Pledge, the furniture stays cleaner longer... don't ask me why? To remove dust on granite in the kitchen and baths, I swear by Windex with Vinegar. For stainless steel, Cerama Brite Stainless Steel Polish and Conditioner is my favorite. This conversation has made me tired... good luck fighting dust - it's a lifelong battle!

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Well i guess i'm the only cheapo in the room

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@woothulhu: Cheapo or not, it may get the job done.

I've used some form of Swiffer wipes (are they pre-moistened?) that left very visible lines of smeared dust. I cannot vouch for the gentleness of the chemicals in them either.

Ideally, I'd like to use some form of washable microfiber in combination with a relatively safe and accessible spray.

As for vacuums, mine tends to fling more dust into the air than pick up - perhaps I should bite the bullet and get a Dyson.

As for air purifiers, can anyone advise on the ionic, bladed versions? Gimmick? Wave of the future?

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@czarmatt: Ionic == gimmick. Air filter (like some of those mentioned) works, and I was surprised to see this. I bought the original one because I'm a compulsive shopper, not for any good reason. I got lucky, though, and have been very happy with it.

I'm not a fan of ANYTHING disposable, which definitely includes swiffers and the related junk that goes with them. Sometimes it can't be avoided, but I mostly use rags to clean with, until they are completely worn out. Old washcloths, dish towels, t-shirts, anything that has a decent absorbency, and is primarily cotton (or cotton-like), works just fine. I use Enddust, but sparingly (a can lasts me several years).

One of the biggest causes of dust is carpet. I always rip out carpet, and replace it with other flooring, and with area rugs. I clean my floors with a dustmop (although I love my little refurbished Shark I got from Woot a while back, and sometimes I use it instead).

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@czarmatt, @shrdlu: Specifically the swiffer duster products which do not use any chemicals. They pick up dust, rather than redistribute it, like most other dry products.

http://www.swiffer.com/en_US/duster.do

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@woothulhu: I know what they are. I still prefer good honest dust rags. Cheaper. I had a box of those swiffer things that came inside something. I've washed them and re-used them, multiple times. I still wouldn't spend any money on them.

Oh, and they don't pick up dust one bit better than any old washcloth or dishtowel. Really.

[Edit] Does this mean the marriage proposal is off? :-D

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@shrdlu: If we're talking dry rag vs. dry swiffer duster, I will take the swiffer everytime. The only property I am advocating is the dry product. Find a really dusty surface in your house (cause you won't find one in mine), wipe half of it with a plain rag, and half with a SwDu, and then look at the floor below, or watch the air as you dust.

Your brain is why I asked, I am not threatened by the smart ladies.

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@woothulhu: You will find dusty surfaces in my house, especially now that there's outside to play in. Today's the first day for irrigation. I've been busy, walking the lines, looking for winter damage (so far, very little), and letting the smaller beds run a full cycle. We always have winds, and it's a desert. There's going to be dust.

I have used those same methods, when I first got them. I actually favor the old linen dishtowels as the best dust cloths (followed closely by old pillowcases, and they don't MAKE pillow cases like those anymore, dammit). If you use a rag that's more polyester, then it just pushes the dust around. Unless you're using it with some kind of polish, you might as well not bother. In the kitchen, I favor Jubilee (which you can still purchase directly from SC Johnson). Otherwise, I use an occasional application of Howard Feed-n-Wax, or just a clean, dry cloth.

Hah! Going to go post that as a deal!

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I use Swiffer Dusters. Make sure you are buying the correct ones for dusting. The smooth Dusters go on the Swiffer Mop. The fluffy ones go on the Swiffer Duster handle. I have 2 different handles, one is an extension handle I can use to dust crown mouldings, etc. The Swiffer Dusters can not be washed. If you see it pushing dust around and not picking it up, you need to replace it with a new one. I also use Pledge Clean & Dust with a microfiber cloth.

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I guess I am a real cheapo, I use a damp (with water) rag. No chemicals, recyclable, cheap and always handy. Sometimes I use a used dryer sheet for my monitor and TV screen.

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Have to second the used dryer sheets for the electronics. They work well. As for other dust, with 2 big dogs I have a ton. Recently started getting the dogs groomed which has cut down on the shedding immensely. Like, huh, I might even enjoy having dogs this spring immensely. For the rest of it, I use an old fashioned duster, that I picked up for somewhere in the $3 range at walmart. Works well, don't have to worry about chemicals and, little kids think it's "fun" to clean with it.

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WINDEX for EVERYTHING

@josefresno: Good lord- clean air doesn't come cheap, does it?

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I really like my swiffer duster. No chemicals needed, no dust cloud being moved around. Between that and my Dyson - I don't have dust around.

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Just to add to this, even though its a very old topic. Swiffer pads do not redistribute dust because they are like microfibers. Unlike cotton, or any other regular rag. They do not contain chemicals, its their texture and material that catches dust, just like pure microfiber cloths, they retain dust for many passes, unlike regular rags.