questionsany recommendations for an indoor (stationary…

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Do you already own a regular bicycle? You might want to consider getting an indoor trainer for it. Then you have a bicycle that you are comfortable on, and the only additional space occupied in your house is the trainer itself - many of which fold down nicely to take up very little space.

You can pick up a basic indoor trainer for under $100 at many places. I'd highly recommend it.

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I've been considering this Schwinn recumbent for a couple months.
http://www.amazon.com/Schwinn-100194-A20-Recumbent-Bike/dp/B003UNXG9Q/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1316990778&sr=8-3
Reviews are pretty good about noise and usefulness, price isn't too bad.
I have a nice Trek mountain bike I used to love to ride, but my wrists take too much of a beating anymore.

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Whatever you settle on, try to wait until January or February and get it on Craigslist- cheap. This is after the 'resolution' has worn thin or off and it's in the way.
Personally, I went a different direction- Gazelle Freestyle Elite(not the $100 one in Walmart, one with the resistance cylinders you can adjust). Again, $400 new, Craigslist(almost unused) for $75. Not noisy and doesn't destroy my knees. You won't build bulk, but it will get your behind toned IF you're religious about it.

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@xdavex:

Thanks. I really wasn't considering a recumbent due to the lack of arm involvement, but now that I'm thinking about it, the main thing I need is the leg workout. Besides, I can probably get a better upper body workout with weights and/or push ups.

The reviews are mostly good on that one (well, except for the fan, which is universally hated, appatrently).

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we bought this bike a few years ago and love it:
http://www.amazon.com/Stamina-15-0200-InTone-Folding-Recumbent/dp/B000UZFSSO

it's fairly quiet (have to bump the volume on the TV a couple notches) and gets the job done. the only thing i don't like about it is max resistance is a little low. but, i usually just bike for a few more minutes to make up the difference. if you go with this one, look around for a better price. we bought ours about 3 years ago and paid around $130 with free shipping.

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@havocsback has a good point about getting 'em used - but the dates aren't necessary (plus in Jan/Feb the resolver's are still in "I'll do it tomorrow" mode..they haven't yet accepted defeat)

Yard sales too...still warm enough that they're going on and this is the perfect time of year to get exercise equipment. Just like the New Years Res., summer's over and people aren't so concerned with "getting in shape for summer."

Picked up a really nice, like-new, recumbent bike last year...name brand too, can't remember if it was a Nordic Track or a Bowflex

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Also, as for my personal preference...I like to work out as many areas at the same time as possible - so you might try to lean towards something with some kinda upper-body/arm feature.. totally preference though.

Might look into some ankle/wrist weights too :D - even a small amount of weight has an impact if your doing endless reps..

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@lparsons42: I came here to suggest the same thing. A stationary trainer for your existing bike is a great way to go. There are two basic types. The first is the A-frame type that clamps on to the rear of your bike and has a roller for your rear tire. This is the easiest type as your bike is fixed in the upright position. The front tire just sits there and doesn't spin. The 2nd is the double roller type. This is a flat frame with two pairs of rollers connected by a belt, both wheels spin. This simulates riding a bike as opposed to just pedaling a bike because you have to maintain balance and direction, the same as riding a bike outdoors. The A-frames are cheaper and easier, but the rollers will keep you more mentally engaged, and will work your core better .

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Also, if you go with a stationary trainer (either style) and your existing bike has knobby tires, you will want to swap them with smooth road tires when using your trainer. It will cut down on noise a bunch. For the A-frame you only need to change the rear, for the double-rollers you would want to change both.

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@lparsons42, @rustybender:

Thanks. I was looking into indoor trainers right after my old stationary bike died, but got distracted by a deal on an elliptical machine and never went back to them.

Many, many years ago a friend gave me a fan one; the frame was the length of the bike and had a support that replaced the front quick-release wheel while the rear tire ran on the axle of the fan. (No idea the brand & it was left behind when my ex-wife got the house.)

A roller trainer will require more mental concentration than I will have available most of the time (early AM, pre-coffee, while watching TV... a guaranteed way to put tire marks on the basement & do at least minor damage to my body).

Besides, the main problem with an indoor trainer in my case is having to schlep my bike down a narrow hallway, around a tight turn, down the basement stairs, and then another tight turn, reversing this to get out. Doable but not worth the hassle to save the extra cost of an indoor bike.

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@carl669:

Thanks. I'll read the reviews for that one a bit later.

I'm still not sure I'm willing to settle for a recumbent, as I was talking to a friend about it at work today and he agrees with my initial feeling that I'd be better with a bike that involves the arms since this will be the only machine I'm getting (at least initially).

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@havocsback:

Hmmm... not sure about that Gazelle... Can it cope with a guy who weighs 270-280 lbs?

As for waiting until the Spring... I'll be 300 lbs by then if I don't get something that I'll actually use until then (provided my doctor and/or nutritionist don't kill me first). I really don't want to wait until then.

However, Craigslist is certainly a good idea. Thanks.

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@drchops:

I had a Road-something (maybe Roadmaster) that also worked the arms and I liked that... I think I'm going to stick with something that involves my arms.

(Kind of get up, drink some water, pick something to watch from the night before or whatever, and just start riding... I know that once I get back into the habit of doing it and lose maybe ten pounds, I'll feel so much better and then I'll start looking forward to doing it.)

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@baqui63: I checked our paperwork, and the Freestyle Elite was rated @ 300. The newer models, like the lil' lightweight in Walmart I mentioned is more like 225. Heck, even check now, a quick check of the local CL brought up over a dozen, only 1 Elite, and it was $100(which means $60 or less, if they haven't thrown it to the curb).

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@havocsback:

Well, it could handle me... just not sure if I could handle it. (If what's his name was a fat balding dude, or I was maybe 10 years younger or already in better shape, maybe, but somehow I see myself regretting getting it as I lay in the ER moaning...)

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BTW- I ended up getting a barely used Life Cycle C3. It is about seven to ten years old (not the current model or the one before that), but it was totally free and in mint condition.

Came from a neighbor cleaning out his parent's house after his mother died. He didn't want anything, though I gave him a couple of very nice bottles of wine I got on wine.woot.

Thanks again for everyone's input.