questionswould you sell your class ring?

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im not over 40 but yes I'd sell my highschool ring. college? no way.

vote-for21vote-against

Never got one. I don't think I own anything made of gold. But it is sad when jewelry is worth less than the metal it's made of.

vote-for14vote-against

Never had one. Didn't see the point.

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wait....neither of mine are made of gold so I'm not thinking I'd get very much.

vote-for16vote-against

The hot thing when I was in college 200 years ago was for guys to have their class rings melted down to make gold nugget jewelry for their girlfriends. Personally, yuck. Never liked the things. Now I sit here two centuries later laughing at the guys who gave away all that gold to girls they haven't seen since college.

Would I sell mine? Probably not. I'm sentimental. However, since my house was burglarized about 20 years ago and that ring was among the victims, I suspect that it's already been melted down and someone else pocketed the cash. (sigh)

vote-for19vote-against

Sure, I'd sell my ring(s). How much are you paying? Wait...how do you know I'm over 40?

vote-for11vote-against

@barnabee: The internet knows all, sees all, frequently tells all?

vote-for12vote-against

What will it mean to you when you are dead?

The only benefit I see to not selling it, is that your grandchildren will hold onto it and it will be worth 10 times what it is now.

vote-for9vote-against

@magic cave: Yep, you're right. And thanks to Heartbleed everyone knows my social security and credit card numbers, too. sigh

vote-for14vote-against

When I moved to Japan I knew money would be very tight for a while. I brought my HS class ring as a source of emerngency money, I haven't sold it yet, but I am willing. Now if I could just find the little bugger I could hide it in a safe place.

vote-for13vote-against

i feel out of place, as i was never a member of the socioeconomic strata that was willing and able to get a class ring. i am happy and satisfied simply to have made it out of high school alive.

no1 no1
vote-for14vote-against

My class rings are in a safe deposit box. I have no children to pass them along to, and I can't put my finger on why they seem so precious to me.

Perhaps because my late father sold HIS class ring when he needed money. I would give anything to have that ring back now.

vote-for13vote-against

My husband and I both sold ours about a year ago. We figured that's probably what our kids would do with them, so we did it first and used the money. Frankly, there was no special feeling for them. Neither of us are very sentimental. And it was back in the days when there was a lot of gold in them.

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@moondrake: Sad doesn't cover it in my book - garish!

vote-for11vote-against

I"ve got my HS class ring but it isn't gold or anything: not worth anything anyway. It's sitting in a drawer doing nothing: not quite sure why I still keep it. My college ring is gold, but I like it too much. Unfortunately, I mashed my right hand lifting weights more than a year ago, so now it doesn't fit anymore.

vote-for11vote-against

Sure, if I had any idea where it was.

vote-for9vote-against

In a heartbeat. It's an asset that I can part with as needed.

vote-for7vote-against

I did. When I got married to my ex-husband, we did not have much money. I had our rings made, mostly financed my trading in rings I did not wear anymore. I think I paid $100. This was 1995.

vote-for6vote-against

Never bothered to buy one. I had older sisters who did and then they left and never wore them . I learned from that.
I do have my father's ring. He's still alive, but he gave it to me for my BD one year. It's not for sale.

vote-for3vote-against

Kept my HS ring, sold my college ring and wear my Fraternity ring since it is essentually college.

vote-for10vote-against

Unfortunately my high school ring was not made of gold. It wasn't even made of real silver. I would happily sell it (if I could find it) since I never wear it but it isn't worth anything. It was likely the dumbest thing I ever bought.

vote-for9vote-against

I already did a few years ago to go toward a down payment on my house. I never wore it or my letter jacket.

vote-for10vote-against

If my high school ring was worth anything I might. But I got the version that wasn't made of gold or any other valuable metal. So no real incentive.

I never got a college ring. It wasn't really a thing where I went. Part that probably was because due to co-ops and internships and such, graduation dates (even years) tended to be in flux until you got that piece of paper in your mailbox that said you were eligible for graduation. It took the average undergrad 5.5 years to get out and no one really cared about being the "Class of XX". We didn't even use the standard terms (sophomore, junior, etc) and instead just counted years. It was less complicated that way.

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I would sell my class ring. It's just been sitting in a jewelry box for ten years. I think it's white gold so I wonder how much it would be worth.

I wasn't aware college rings were even a thing.

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@no1: You're not alone. My parents were happily middle-class, yet we were all appalled at the cost of class rings. (And this was back in the mid-60's!)

Never bought one, never missed it.

vote-for9vote-against

My parents gave my brother a class ring for college and as he is 6 years older than me I saw that he didn't really wear it anymore so when my parents offered to buy mine I asked if they would just buy me a nice ring from a jeweler instead. I still wear that ring every day and it actually means a lot to me so I wouldn't sell it unless it was necessary (hospital bill, starving, etc)

vote-for9vote-against

Sold my high school ring decades ago, when the price of gold made it worth about 5 times its original cost. Never could afford a college ring, probably would have sold that, too. I'm definitely not sentimental about my formal education.

vote-for5vote-against

Never saw a point to a class ring - high school or college unless you graduated from a military academy or even ivy league.

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Depends if it's worth my time...how much can I get for a typical class ring?

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@bsmith1: If it's made from a non-precious metal, maybe $50. If it's gold, then probably melt value.

The exceptions are the military academy rings because there are collectors.

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@first2summit: seems like it was only 10k gold... I'd probably get $100 or less in smelt value... Need to go weigh it.

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High school ring? Yeah, in a heartbeat.

My college ring is really big and heavy. I don't wear it a lot, but it should probably be classified as a weapon, so it might come in handy some day. Keepin' it!

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@first2summit: Re: the Acadamies, nobody likes a ring-knocker. Nobody.

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@zuiquan: Yet, so many apply:
Navy: 20.6k in 2012
Army: Over 15k in 2012
Air Force: 9.7k in 2013
Each of which only accepts a little over 1k.

As for the class rings, they can go for a few hundred for a non-precious metal one compared to $50 if you lucky from any other college/university.

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@first2summit: Trust me, nobody in the regular military thinks highly of academy officers except for other academy officers. If you wear your ring you're considered an even bigger tool. Hence the pejorative term for those that do.

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@zuiquan: I'm fully aware of the attitude of the enlisted have to the academy grads. It's not any different than those who always have something to say about those who have ivy league degrees or MBAs.

Have you thought about the difference between the two? Sure, the enlisted didn't go to college because of money. But the academies pay for it all for 5 years service but what separates the enlisted and those who went to the academy are the academics, test scores, non-curriculars, etc. I guarantee if you gave some HS grad who was going to enlist an academy appt, they'd take it in a heartbeat.

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@first2summit: It's not just enlisted though. Other officers don't respect them either. There's a vast difference between the level of self-perceived quality and actual quality coming from the academies. Out of the many many academy grads I've known over the years maybe three were actually good leaders. Only one of those three wore his ring and the other two never talked about graduating from the academy. I only found out about it from their bios. The rest would never let you doubt for a moment that they went to the academy and were therefore the most awesome thing to ever happen to your unit and/or branch. Where you get your commission has absolutely nothing to do with whether or not you're actually a good leader. It's amazing when people turn out to be good leaders in spite of being academy grads. Since the whole point of the academies is to churn out great leaders I think they're a huge waste of taxpayer money. Because they don't do what they're chartered to do.

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@zuiquan: I include the NCOs with the enlisted because that's how they came through the ranks.

So here's a hypothetical...I'm assuming you're an enlisted and possibly an NCO or are speaking for them in this discussion. You have a son who is in the top 5% of his HS class, 3-4 year letterman in varsity wrestler or football player, have all the extracurricular activities, honor society, good SAT and ASVAB scores, etc. He's gotten a nomination and an appointment to pick the academy of your choice. So would you tell him to just enlist, get into OCS, and work his way up or take the appointment? (Let's factor out college as an option.)

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@first2summit: When I say officer, I don't include NCOs. They're non-commissioned and are enlisted. Officers are those who went to college and/or the academies and graduated and received a commission. When I say other officers don't respect them I mean other commissioned officers. Because it is a fact that they don't respect them. If someone's grades and extra curriculars and test scores are so good they could easily get a scholarship to just about any school they'd like to go to. To say it's an either go to the academy or suck rocks for years (and by the way you don't just get an appointment to go to OCS from being enlisted, you still have to have a 4 year degree) proposition tells me you're not quite sure how it all works. The days of promotions to the officer ranks based on just being awesome are long, long gone. Now, you can become a warrant officer without having a 4 year degree and those men and women are generally pretty great. But they've been enlisted and been there done that.

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@zuiquan: BTW - this divide occurs in the civilian world as well - those who worked their way up v. the MBAs. And I've posed the same question to those who knock getting an MBA.

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@first2summit: I take it you've not been in the military? Having worked in both I can tell you that they are completely different cultures. There's no "working your way up" to a commission in the military. You have to have a 4 year degree. Full stop. Becoming an NCO is a matter of time and if you don't perform adequately you're shown the door. There are limits on how long you're allowed to stay in the military without progressing through the ranks. Stay too long at a certain rank and don't do the things you need to do to make the next rank and you're gone. This is true for both officers and enlisted. Nobody is jealous that someone went to the academy. Nobody gives a crap where you went to school or didn't. It's all about getting the job done. There's no resting on past laurels. But if you make it all about where you went to school because of "awesome", you're going to be a problem. And most of them are. Because they have a ridiculously inflated sense of self-worth that is not reality.

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@zuiquan: No, I turned down an appointment. My father, grandfather, etc all went to one academy or another.

But you didn't answer my question.

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@first2summit: I did answer your question in that it's not based in reality so the situation you presented is not one which is actually possible. Here's my point: going to the academy does not automatically make you a good leader. In fact, it's usually the opposite. The reason the academies exist is to make good leaders. If they fail at their mandate then what is the point of having them?

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@zuiquan: No you avoided it. It's a hypothetical...a thought experiment. And in refusing to answer it, you've answered it.

I understand your point - that if it doesn't turn out good leaders, then what's the point of having them and I would agree. But you've come to the conclusion based on your anecdotal experience that they don't. And that's the problem, it's anecdotal. How many have you met - many. We turn out thousands every year.

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@first2summit: OK, you show me scientifically verifiable studies that show the academies put out good leaders and I'll buy it. Until then, I'll go with my 23+ years of actual real-world experience. If your thought experiment is flawed because you don't quite understand the system in which you're proposing the experiment how can I possibly answer said question? I've already told you why your question is a non-starter, but I'll be glad to answer one if you'll base it in reality so that I can give you a reality based answer. You've given me a "Sophie's choice" that isn't applicable in the real world. I'm just curious though, what answer do you think I gave by not giving one?

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@first2summit: What's this "we" business all of a sudden? Are you somehow part of one of the academies, aside from being a legacy?

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@zuiquan: "We" as in the country, tax payers, etc.

Ok, I think we've reached an end point. Thanks.

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@first2summit: Ah, I get you. When you said we I thought maybe you had been sandbagging and had had an actual dog in the fight. As in you were a member of faculty or staff. Look, there's no shame in not knowing how the system works. It's completely opaque to outsiders and it changes and evolves over time. What was typical 30 or 40 years ago is now impossible and vice versa.

vote-for8vote-against

Yeah.
The fact that you're considering it probably means that the sentimental value isn't all that high..

I think most of these kinds of rings are just sold by the school to make money, so I'm assuming there is no special meaning/award related to it though (could be wrong of course).

I always think of it like this when I have trouble parting with something:
Would you be willing to BUY that ring for what you'd be able to sell it for?

vote-for2vote-against

depends what it means to you...