questionsis window-farming a good idea? has anyone here…

vote-for29vote-against
vote-for7vote-against

I didn't check your link but I have found windows to be very hard to grow. I've had some small success with mirrors but the windows I've tried growing always end up shattering.

vote-for7vote-against

@zuiquan: Windows '95 was MUCH better at growing. '98 came along and that was that.

vote-for7vote-against

You might want to check out MOFGA (The Maine Farmers and Growers Association). They go out of their way to be helpful and they have tons of information on organic gardening; I'm sure they'd be able to help you out.

vote-for4vote-against

I've been wanting to try something like this, but I kill literally every plant I try to grow, so I haven’t been brave enough to give it a shot. I would definitely be putting a huge Rubbermaid tub below it to catch any potential leaks, at least for the first few days. If you end up making one, I’d love to hear about your experience and whether or not you think it was worth the time/money investment.

vote-for4vote-against

This looks like a cool idea. We love our summer garden (we already have tomatoes growing!)and it would be fun to have the ability to keep one going year round. My only problem is my best south facing windows (most sun) are in my family room. It really isnt' feasible to have something big and potentially messy like that in there. If I had random office/utility room that faced south I'd definitely give that a shot. Maybe we'll try out this one next winter for when we start growing some seeds before spring. http://our.windowfarms.org/2009/07/29/3-plant-air-lift-window-farm/

vote-for7vote-against

My initial reaction to the system you referenced:

1. Growing soil-less is more difficult than growing in pots with soil, and the nutrient solution has to be constantly monitored.

2. Most windows (unless they have direct sun for 10-12 hours per day) do not have enough light for most food plants, so you would likely have to supplement with extra lighting. Ironically, the sunlight that is too little for the leaves is often too much for the roots, especially in small pots in direct sun. (That's why roots move down into cool, dark earth while the tops move toward the sun.) There's more electricity being used for the pump.

It's cheaper/easier to use pots with potting soil in a sunny window. If you run wicks out the bottom of the pots and sit them in a tray filled with gravel and water, the wicks will take up water as needed. You may still need extra light, but a simple hanging fixture with full-spectrum bulbs is easy to rig up.

Herbs, strawberries, cherry tomatoes, peppers, lettuce.

vote-for4vote-against

This question & the answers show the stuff I really like about Woot! It's amazing the range of information we have around here. And the smartypants answers cracked me up, too. I have absolutely no interest in window gardening, but this topic was fun anyway.

vote-for0vote-against

A good idea? I'm not sure. Something I would try? No. I have plenty of ground to work with.

vote-for1vote-against

Thanks susan11125, kristiwsu, eraten, & adadavis for your advice!
Thanks zuiquan & capguncowboy for your levity! (...it relieves tension...and the fear of death. {Terminator III})
Thanks gertiestn and jsimsace for chiming in despite your disinterest in the topic!
I'll post an update if I proceed with the project.
-=C=-

vote-for1vote-against

I tried starting a window farm back in '98. Had a great crop too, 'til they all crashed.