questionscan you help me siphon my gas?

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s21 s21

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Wow that's pretty tough, Not sure about the gas siphoning, just commenting to make sure you're alright and wish you well during what will surely be a stressful next couple of days. Hope all is well.

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Try looking to youtube. I'm not sure from where, but I heard there's good videos there. Besides, it's youtube. There HAS to be something.

DO NOT do that method you see in TVs/ movies where someone takes a tube and sucks it out until the pressure changes and the gas flows. The principle works, but it's beyond dangerous.

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Hose attached to a shopvac.

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I remember seeing special siphoning hoses in an auto parts store. They had a pump (hand squeeze) in them to start the flow.

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@nmchapma: Sounds like an explosion to me. Electricity and gasoline vapors?

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The problem is, is that I can't use the pumps because of the protector in the tank.

s21 s21
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@tbgolladay: well the car has been totaled already...

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here's a couple of bad idears:
1. get a mechanic to remove the anti-siphoning thingie so you can siphon it yourself.
2. gas normally has to be able to get from the tank to the engine, rite? disconnect the pipe from the engine and point it into a suitable storage device. run the fuel pump until the tank is drained.

no1 no1
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for real? you just got rear-ended by a drunk driver, your car is totaled, and you're worried about fiddy dolla gas?

you sure you didn't hit your head in the wreck?

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While I understand your desire to salvage the gas I wouldn't try anything suggested so far(most are probably in jest). I've also tried getting a narrow tube down the neck of a car with anti-siphon to no avail.
To add to No1's bad ideas:
1. Drill a hole in the bottom of the tank and run gas into a oil pan, put your finger over the hole, pour gas with funnel into gas can, repeat.....

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@nmchapma: You are joking, right? There was a Car Talk "puzzler" on that exact matter some time ago...

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@no1: You probably have the right idea with #2. Being as >90% of all cars have in-tank electric gas pumps, you can often fool the car into thinking it is running correctly and get it to spit out the gas. Of course, the challenge with that is disconnecting it in a place useful for extracting liquid gasoline without making the car flip out and shut the process down.

If you really wanted to, you could also try removing the gas cap with the car on jack stands, and then cutting the lines (since you are not concerned about the fate of the car at this point). Gravity might take over and do the work for you. Most tanks have outlet and return lines, which can be hard to differentiate - just cut both and point them into a container. With the gas cap off you should get the gas to flow more quickly than it would with the cap on and lines cut.

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1. Call the Insurance Company of the person who rear-ended you and tell them you want a Rental Car comparable with what you own, style and comfort not age and mileage... Their responsibility!! Don't let them send a check for the old car until you both agree on a Value... They will try and low ball you in a bad way... Get comparable prices for similar cars in similar condition and mileage available in your area... Don't trust that they will give you full replacement value without doing your research, most Insurance Companies will short change you in a Heart Beat.. Used cars, even very damaged ones have high resale value for parts and are getting high prices at auction.. Scrap value alone in the northeast is over $200.00 a ton... If the car is late model and a popular one the used parts value could be thousands... I wouldn't let them have it until you agree on a price...

2. Now worry about $50.00 in lost gas....

Good luck with the car search... Hope you are Ok otherwise...

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Sucks, sorry to hear that. I'd highly advise to let the gas go though, no reasonably safe and cheap way to get at it anymore. Siphoning is almost impossible with any modern cars, they have screens in place to prevent it.

In theory, the easiest way to get the gas would be to make a hole in the bottom of the tank and drain it. However, unless you have extensive experience with car mechanics it's not something you should do. You would need the right equipment (Nothing that could create a spark! Something like an air drill is best) and would need to know exactly where to drill (also so you don't inadvertently create a spark).

Even then, if the damage is anywhere near the fuel tank, you wouldn't want to risk it just in case any fuel is leaking. Gasoline in liquid form isn't explosive (it will only burn). The danger comes from gasoline vapor, which is explosive if mixed in the right ratio with the air. An explosion is unlikely, but it's not even close to worth the risk.

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OK, time for a serious answer I guess. The anti-siphon in your tank is not a valve it is a block or screen of some sort. This means that it only stops the hose from being inserted into the tank. This can be broken but should only be done with much care(and wooden tools). Breaking it could also cause trouble with the insurance company such as accusations of fruad. Usually new cars come with some kind of specialized funnel in case you run out of gas and need to add some from a fuel can. This may be an option of getting past the block without breaking it.

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@hobbitss: "If the car is late model and a popular one the used parts value could be thousands... I wouldn't let them have it until you agree on a price..."

If the insurance company is replacing the car, it's only fair that the damaged one becomes their property to recoup costs. I assume that's why they're sending someone to pick it up in the first place.

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@omnichad: I don't think he's saying he should take the parts, I think he's saying he should remember that the parts have value and try to get a fair price for it even if it is totaled. If he lets them tow the car away before they've agreed on a price then he has to take what they give him. The car isn't theirs until he has a check or a written agreement...At least I hope that's what he means.

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@nmchapma: Yes, that is what I was trying to say.. Until they pay for it the car doesn't belong to the Insurance Company and if you let them take it you no longer have any leverage with them.
Personal experience.....