questionswhy would a cat start pooping on the rug?

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Your assessment that the cat objects to you is probably correct. Cats are notorious for objecting to changes in the environment. Pooping sends a message of dislike and a claim upon territory. It may help to keep the litterbox scrupulously clean as some cats don't like a "used" litter box. If the box is in the bathroom that you use, that may be part of the dynamic as well. If the cat consistently uses the same area on the rug then getting that area fully cleaned may help, as well as denying the cat access. Double stick tape in the area may also keep the cat away for a while. You can certainly try to make nice to the cat, but chances are that getting rid of you is the ultimate solution for the cat's well being.

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Maybe the cat doesn't like the rug :) ?

But in seriousness, I agree with nortonsark. You might try buying the cat something to see if that helps at all. Otherwise, keep the litter box clean.

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My cat did the same thing when a d-o-g moved into the house. It is driving me crazy. I even gave her the upstairs and the d-o-g the downstairs, so she doesn't even interact with him. I have tried shampooing the carpet. Am afraid if I block off that area, she will just pick another carpet to ruin. Have not tried the double-stick tape. Watching here for more ideas.

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@nortonsark: ROTFL!!! Getting rid of the husband for the well being of the cat!!! Love it.

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My cats only poop where they shouldn't for three reasons: 1)they are mad at us for one reason or another 2)the litter box is. It clean enough to their liking 3) they are ill
The last time it was #3. But there were other signs that made it pretty obvious. Usually it is #2 (no pun intended) if I miss my normal cleaning timeframe.

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Probably a case of mistaken identity.

It's a shame...I bet that rug really tied the room together.

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A Feliway diffuser might help him adjust. My cat freaked out when we got a puppy and the only thing that helped was Feliway. It does take 24 hours - 4 weeks to start noticing a difference. With our cat he was back to normal 24 hours after plugging in the diffuser.

It can be found on Amazon for a good price. Hope this helps!

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Pretty much, what has been said. Make sure the litter box is very clean, and accessable. Maybe add a second if the house is large. Completely clean where the cat pooped, use Nature's Miracle and a UV light to make sure that you got everything (they will go back to where they pooped). If possible, try and block off the area that cat was using. Also, check with the vet: although not likely the animal may be sick. Also, the vet can probably give you some other ideas if there is nothing physically wrong.

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Cat is not impressed by your continuous presence. And now you can haz suffer the consequences.

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@wilfbrim: Yeah, always a good idea to get a vet check, just in case it's more than just your objectable presence.

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I agree with everything here, most likely is the change of routine in which case I also recommend the Feliway diffusers. They worked for us with a male peeing in the wrong place. It was that or put him on prozac.
I keep two litter boxes per cat, which I've found really important for multi-cat households, probably less so with a single cat, but if you can find a spot it may be enough to

At 9 years old, it could be health issues. We had a cat with irritable bowel syndrome that stopped pooping in her box even when it wasn't flaring up and the poop were tubular. The Bissel spot bot saved that cat's life

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One small tip for getting a cat to accept you more, is to completely ignore it. Only pet it when it wants you to (i.e. when it comes up to you). And even then, be sparing, think of it as playing hard to get. If it comes up to you and your wife, assume it is there for your wife, and leave it alone unless it comes specifically over to you.

This is my approach for meeting any new pet and has worked well for me. Perhaps I am just lucky with animals, but very frequently I will get the "oh he/she never likes men (or whatever other characteristic), but they seem to like you".

This is obviously going on the assumption that your newly permanent presence is the problem. I would also try the other suggestions here cause it is pretty easy to keep the litter box clean and stuff like that and it can definitely help. But hopefully once the cat realizes that you are not going to mess up its routine, it should settle down.

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time to change cat food brands

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As far as acclimating the cat, you might try taking over basic responsibilities for it, primarily feeding it. If it depends on you for food it might revise it's opinion of you upwards. Don't kiss up to it, just became the one that cat needs stuff from. If it's a male cat all my be lost, though. I had a neutered male cat that was absurdly possessive of me and it just kept escalating. He wouldn't tolerate the scent of another male in the house. It started with him peeing on my bed where my male dog slept. Then he started peeing on the sofa where my male best friend sat when he visited. Next was the mail, delivered by the malemailman. I lost all patience when he peed all over my groceries because the checkout clerk that bagged them was male. He'd always been an indoor-outdoor cat, but he became an outdoor cat after that. Which was sad because he was otherwise loving and sweet, but that male cat marking stench is ineradicable.

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@moondrake: Thanks! I learned a new word today and you are right, cat pee is pretty much ineradicable.
The advice to kiss up to the cat without being obvious is good. Make yourself useful by putting out the food and such, but don't make a point of cornering the cat and petting it. If the cat comes to you, it's OK to pet it, but don't push it. Cats are hunters, and as hunters, they think they are invisible. Once you point out to the cat that you see it, you have insulted it. You should only see the cat when it has voluntarily decloaked itself.

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Because they're jerks.

I agree with everything here. Only thing I can add is that if he's using the same spot, try putting another litter box there for a while.

As far as clean up, I used the dog version of this and it's the best stuff ever. It got out a 4-yr old dog pee spot that no professional carpet cleaner could get out.

http://www.simplegreen.com/products_pet_cat.php

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Great answers! Thanks all. I'm going to look into a lot of these suggestions, meanwhile ignoring him. I'm a dog person so maybe I've been giving him the wrong type of attention.

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The cat might be stressed by your presence. He may be asserting himself or he may actually be physically sick.
This is going to sound gross, but have you checked how the poop feels? If it's very hard, he could be having digestive problems. If it hurts to poop, and he associates the litter box with that pain, he's going to poop elsewhere.
If it does seem firm, have your wife give him some pumpkin puree or some lactulose (sold at pet stores) to help move things along.