questionshow do you feel when music gets popular?

vote-for16vote-against
vote-for3vote-against

I definitely agree. Radio stations overplay any song that has popularity and ruin them for the people who "discovered" it before it was a hit. I know they need to get ratings, but it would be nice to have a variety of music played, rather than the constant loop of top 10's.

vote-for8vote-against

If your radio only plays a constant loop of top 10s, you need to tune to a different station.

vote-for3vote-against

@rockytrh: It's either that or a loop of the same most popular classic rock songs. I only know of one station in my area that has decent variety but they still have no problem playing Gotye and fun. 10 times a day. And, as I mentioned, it doesn't matter if I change my station because you still hear it blasting from everyone else's radio and mouth.

vote-for4vote-against

It usually makes me sad when songs get popular because a song I loved turns into a song I hate due to it being overplayed on every station.

I try to look on the bright side and be happy for the band since they're getting $ and the recognition they deserve for being awesome.

vote-for3vote-against

I somewhat agree with you, I hate when songs/bands I like get way over played, like Kings of Leon or more recently Gotye's Somebody I Used To Know. And I really don't like huge concerts where you can hardly see the band. But I do like when a band gets popular enough that most people I know know and like them.

vote-for6vote-against

I think it's great. The artist is getting the recognition they deserve, and the only people who are unhappy about it are $@#& hipsters. It's a win-win.

vote-for4vote-against

If overplaying songs on the radio ruins music for you, why would you listen to those stations in the first place? That's kinda all they do.

vote-for5vote-against

>you will be surrounded by people who think it's acceptable to sing along.
Whoah, since when did it become unacceptable to sing along to a song?

Anyways- Modest mouse is my big example. I never had the chance to see them before they broke big so I never knew what it was like to see them in a small club. I remember everyone was crying about how float on ruined modest mouse, but it's a really good song and introduced a lot of new fans to their old stuff too. I really enjoyed it because there are a lot of people I know who would have never heard of modest mouse had it not been for that song. A lot of "old fans" say that they sold out by making that song, but it's nice that more people can hear great music.

I don't listen to music on the radio (NPR and KFI and CD's) so I can't really relate to a song getting played out. Anyways, a lot of these guys bust their asses trying to make it as a musician.
[Continued...]

vote-for6vote-against

Isaac Brock had several odd-jobs, one of which included pressure washing rotten meat/fat from delivery trucks. I think after 8 working minimum wage doing your music it's pretty nice to break out and finally be recognized for it.

Also that jazz about mainstream acts never playing small shows is bunk. I saw Cake 1 of 4 nights at the Troubador and that place can't hold more than a few hundred people. One of the best shows I went to recently. Big names still play smaller venues, and they still put on great shows. Like @rprebel said, if you're liking a band because nobody else heard of them you're liking them for the wrong reason.

Another good thing, One of my favorite bands Creeping Weeds is trying to make it in music, I've been promoting them every chance I get just so I can cross my fingers and hope that some day they will be big enough to be able to tour the west coast. I desperately want those guys to make it big, just so I can get a chance to see them live.

vote-for6vote-against

Sorry for two walls of text but music is something i'm really passionate about.

TL;DR: The whole STOP LIKING WHAT I LIKE mentality is garbage. Let people like what they like for whatever reasons. The casual fans will disappear when the next hot act comes out and the new fans that stay will remain true fans.

vote-for3vote-against

You should be happy when a song you like gets popular. It means that artist will probably earn enough money to keep making music a while longer.

vote-for2vote-against

Ok so it seems that most people don't agree with me. I guess I did exaggerate a little. My biggest complaint is how everyone only knows a band for their one single and then never bothers to listen to the rest of their music. How many of you have your iTunes filled up with singles? If I like a song, then I get the CD, if I like a CD then I get their discography. I have about 20 GB of Armin van Buuren lol. Would any of you be willing to do that?

vote-for3vote-against

It isn't really an issue for me. I can only think of 3 new artists that I've really liked in the last 20 years that have crossed over to the point that they're played on mainstream radio a lot.

vote-for3vote-against

Ambivalent, especially since I don't generally listen to radio that much. I do get sick of anything that gets played to death though. Took a couple decades after leaving the dorms to finally be able to stomach Pink Floyd again.

vote-for2vote-against

{SomewhatRelatedTangent}
I observed an interesting progression of songs going from Indi to popular, about 10 years ago.

There was an Internet radio “station” called Radiostorm that aired a show once a week – “The Fret and Stoney Show”. It was a brother and sister duo who would play music that they liked, read fan IMs and e-mails and just “hang” online with the mics open for 2 hours. They ran the show out of the sister’s bedroom.

I noticed that they would debut a new “cool” song on their show which would make it onto the Radiostorm stream about a week or two later. A few weeks after that, the song would appear on K-Rock (NYC – at the time it was a rock station). A few weeks later it would be in heavy rotation on Z100 (the NYC top hitz station).

One notable example was Sk8er Boi, by Avril Lavigne.

{/SomewhatRelatedTangent}

vote-for0vote-against

Mike and I (Eddie), started Radiostorm to present music from a variety of sources. We worked with Stoneybrook, and other college radio stations, as well as with direct sources. It was not highly publicized, but several artists had radio streaming footprints, which we provided. Later I worked to integrate the AP newswire feed into the core footprint. We were happy to pay ASCAP and BMI for use of the music and for payment to the entitled artist, but when RIAA came in and demanded approximately 25% of gross, we were pressed to the wall. Ad Impressions had dropped significantly due to the merging of two primary providers, which squeezed out others like Radiostorm that depended on that revenue to pay the bills.

Eddie

vote-for0vote-against

At the time, Mike and I approached EMC, since we were both engineers working there, to get permission and "sign a deal" to put our internet stream via ShoutCast into the EMC Internet Solutions Group, which later became the Advanced Solutions Group.

Yeah, I see "Fun" and other's mentioned, and remember a TV show with a new song called "Walking on the Sun", which I liked, but soon grew tired of, originally broke. It's amazing to me that the band can not even perform the song without performing it like it's the National Anthem, and hamming up their own lyrics, like it has banner significance to a generation or something....

Regarding Stoney and Fret, they were brother and sister twins in Indiana that the live link was passed to during the show.
Eddie
;>