questionshas anyone tried to use their tv as their…

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Often. I use an hdmi out to the tv so I can watch streaming movies or tv shows, as well. Depending on your computer and tv, you can pick up cable for less than $10.

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I have used it for media purposes, but I have never used it as a monitor for things like gaming, web browsing, or document editing.

I would not want to use a TV as a monitor for something like word processing or web browsing; text just doesn't look sharp. Photo editing or graphics likewise; saturation tends to be off. And it's more fatiguing to look at from desktop viewing distances.

You are also going to be losing out on some of the resolution capabilities by using a television.

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A TV has lower resolution than a computer monitor? That surprises me, but I'm not a gamer, I am an internet browser (I'm here aren't I), and I do some work on my computer. My main concerns were eyestrain and annoyance working from a sofa.

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I've used my tv as a monitor when working from home on occasion. It works fairly well although the settings (both computer and television) need to be adjusted to provide the best picture. Unfortunately it's been a while since I've done it so I don't remember the settings I used.

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I have a dedicated computer hooked to 42" plasma, with a wireless keyboard and mouse. I play some very basic games, stream content, and browse the internet. When browsing I usually need to have the magnifier turned on. Also don't leave the same thing up on the screen for to long if the TV is a plasma, it will burn into the screen.

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yea my monitor has a better resolution but when i need a 2nd monitor for the laptop i just hook up the hdmi and use it. Works well for me, but usually am sitting on the ground at this point (I don't have any hdmi cords over 6 ft) I have also had a computer just hooked up to play games on steam. Worked great except steam doesn't have the controller support yet for navigation (can't wait for big item mode which should be built for using a TV and couch). But this way I can play my PC games on the couch if I want to. So yes it works and seems to work well for me at least.

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I've run this setup for a couple of years on a 36" LCD. With a decent video card(nothing remotely pricey) and GOOD wireless peripherals you'll have no problems. Currently using 2.4 Ghz Lenovo keyboard/trackball(that I bought through Woot), and it was the final piece to the puzzle.

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I'm using a 46" as my tv/monitor. Amazing view for Diablo 3 I must say, and even lower end graphics games like League of Legends can still look great on it. Love the setup, though I've hit a problem recently that if my computer sleeps or the tv turns off (or switches inputs), the computer doesn't like to recognize the tv speakers for sound. Probably a driver issue (I think the update broke it, this didn't use to happen ><), but besides that I'm in gamer heaven XD

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If you go this route, you want to pick a true 1080p television. When you connect your computer you might have to do a little tweaking via the ATI or NVidia control panels to eliminate overscan.

If you do the above, you can get truly sharp text and pictures out of your computer. The reason text looks fuzzy on 720p televisions is that they demand a 1280x720 signal, but have a 1366x768 panel.

The real loss using a TV instead of a monitor is the lack of color range. You'll find that faint colors and pastels are blasted away to white. A good TV, and taking the time to properly calibrate all the settings will go a long way in making this better. Some cheap computer monitors have the same problem anyway. Lower the brightness, decrease the contrast, and turn off dynamic contrast ratio (goes by MANY different names).

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Just because you use a TV in lieu of a standard monitor does not necessarily mean you will be losing out on the definition or quality of the image.

Native resolution, of course, matters most. The second most important factor in determining image quality is pixel pitch. Basically it is the space between pixels. The closer the pixels are, the sharper the image will appear.

You need to also consider how close or far you will be from the actual tv. You won't notice a lack of sharpness until you start sitting very close.

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curt has a point. proximity to the screen and size are very important.

as long as you get a 1080P tv you will still get the 1980x1600 resolution and text will be fine. however your typical monitor is 24" from your face. anything larger than 37" will appear huge and will be a strain on the eyes. Add 6-7" focal length for every 6" of tv. so if you have a 42" tv you want that at least 36 - 42" from your seat.

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It should be noted that not all 1080p TV's will do 1920x1080 resolution for computers. It may simply depend on the input you use. I have a 1080p Toshiba with a VGA input that will only display 1366x768 (or something similar). I have not tried connecting with an HDMI cable, but I am guessing it should work at 1080p. So if you are planning on connecting a computer, make sure you have an input/output that will generate the desired results.

Also, working from a big screen TV does not work for me. I just can't be productive if I am sitting back in an easy chair or couch. I need a desk or at least be sitting closer to the screen to make my mind think it is time to work. I can only use a TV with a big screen for entertainment purposes.

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@wnyx585am: HDMI should make a difference, but sometimes they give false EDID information (list of resolutions, refresh rates) to the computer. There are ways to override it from the computer - but it depends on your brand of graphics card exactly how to do it. One of those settings is to ignore that bad EDID information. I still think that you'd get a better result over HDMI, just knowing the HDMI already supports 1080p from other devices.

As long as you find a way to get your computer to output 1920x1080 at 60Hz, you have a good chance of still getting it to work.

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@omnichad: I will try this, I have a laptop attached to my Monoprice arm and run 1920x1080, great for movies but too much eye strain for web browsing. I hope the overscan is the issue.

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I've used my computer as a TV... but if you have any gaming systems, I wouldn't recommend it.

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I used to with my Apple IIe.

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I have a 37" Visio that I've been using as our primary TV and computer monitor for over three years. Works wonderfully. Any concerns that have been brought up have pretty simple solutions. I highly recommend it.

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@dazlindz: Why would having game systems have anything to do with it...? I have my 360 and Wii both hooked up, just have to hit the "Input" button on the remote to change to the one I want...

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My buddy has used his 52" samsung as his computer monitor with quite pleasing results =) Pretty awesome to be playin games and shoot people on such a massive screen.

I, on the other hand, have an old netbook connected to my TV now that I can access using Synergy and its hooked up to my tv. Quite useful.

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I use a computer with my 42" LCD. Works fine for streaming, utoob, Skype, etc. Not sure that I would want to try to work on it, though. I guess it would depend on how far away you are, and what the viewing angle is.

One piece that it took me a while to figure out was that adding a video card with HDMI was far superior to VGA plus analog audio. With the HDMI, I am able to run at a full 1920 x 1080 (or whatever the heck it is), and it carries the audio as well. I wasn't running a particularly current PC, so I had to add a more current video card.

Mostly, we just use laptops...

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@tossthedice: Maybe it's a Sony Vaio thing, but after I got the TV-computer I realized that it only had outputs (so it could send to an even bigger screen) but no inputs. Since I had a Wii, the choices were getting a converter box or spending a little more to just get a normal TV. I've heard similar complaints from other people who don't realize that their TV computer may be able to get cable TV, but doesn't have the capacity to get inputs from anything else.

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@bestbuysucks: Only if you like trying to read a web site on 480p. Not pleasant, or crisp and sharp.

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Yes.

First suggestion. for browsing purposes learn the Control + Scroll command to resize text on windows desktop or in browsers to aleviate eyestrain issues.

Its great for gaming I played The Old Republic on my 42` LED Westinghaus on both my front line gaming PC as well as my dedicated HTPC and on the HTPC I can play roughly 95% of the games my primary gaming PC can. ONLY issue that the HTPC configuration presents is in gaming because gaming applications rarely have text resize options such as Control+scroll, so some things do not have an option to read due to their small default size. (ie tool tips, etc) Other than that, it was a flawless experience. More enjoyable than playing on a single stand alone monitor. And a separate but equal experience to gaming on a tri monitor display.

Only thing I suggest is despite what others have stated, I perfer routing via VGA cables instead of HDMI. That way you can route the sound directly with channel and not cause A/V sync delay. Best of luck

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Yes.

My office PC is connected to a 42" LCD TV & a 19" LCD monitor and my 50" plasma in the family room is connected to an entertainment PC. Plasma is not so good for computing due to screen burn-in, but great for videos.

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smaller tvs (i have a Vizio) that are 1080p are useful for that.
i mean as opposed to a small 1080p tv viewed from a distance, kind of a waste of pixels if you are sitting that far away.
i think of mine as a computer monitor with an optional tv tuner built-in.
it even has one of those sensors that knows when my computer is sending signal to it, and it powers itself on.

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Same here, had my old desktop hooked up to my 28" lcd on the desk, worked perfectly (except having to manually turn it on and off).
It was great having 2 full size windows open side by side for document working, also great for photo editing
(specifically ordered the 28" to fit in the spot built into my desk).

The only oddity I can think of is depending on how the audio outputs are.
Mine has a headphone jack which is easy for volume control via the TV in addition to the computer, where as the GF has a 32" that does not have the headphone jack, it has RCA connections. This means you have to control volume with the the speaker controller (or component receiver) plus the computer.

Not a deal breaker, just a note.

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If you end up using this setup, do these steps assuming you have Windows 7:

Right click desktop, screen resolution, 'Make text and other items larger or smaller, set it to Larger - 150%

If a program (ex, Google Chrome) you use has messed up resolution after the above step, right click on the program icon, go to properties, Compatibility tab, and check 'Disable display scaling on high DPI settings

Close and reopen the program and it should open a lot clearer

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I've been using a 40" Samsung LCD as a TV/monitor and it's been okay, but I do admit I miss sitting right up near the monitor. Once I find a desk I like, I'll probably change my setup.

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Yes, tried it. Connected it to a 46" LG TV. I didn't really like it.. everything comes out realllly small.

Was great for watching streamed movies back then though before I had Apple TV.

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@lichme: This used to be true but not anymore. With HD tvs that can do 1080p, you are actually dealing with a display that is capable of MORE resolution than old tv's running at a max of 480 lines of res... plus the lcd tvs operate on a pixel scheme rather than actually scanning lines so you don't get the visible lines on REALLY Big tv's... So... You were right... about 10 years ago. LOL and don't take my pokin' too seriously either I'm just funnin ya.

Kris O'C