questionshow long would you continue working for a company…

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I didn't have space above to mention that the boss has not only gotten a raise, but plenty of nice perks as the years have gone on. She also gets a cut of every rental she gets from every site, without having to worry about how many move-outs she has.

I've been thinking about leaving, and going back to my retail roots at a company known to give their employees a raise every year, but the whole back to retail thing scares me!~ I just don't know what to do at this point, because I feel like I'm getting the short end of the stick here.

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I'd start looking for a new job. If you get a better offer that you like, take it. You've written several paragraphs convincing yourself to do just that. So... do it! :)

What's the worst thing that happens? You make a scary change?

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Sorry I can't give you personal experience/advice; have been retired for many years. Will say that several people I know have not received a raise in 3-4 years. And they work for large corporations.

In this economy, not receiving a raise while working for a small family-owned business does not surprise me. It wouldn't surprise me in a better economy either. Best of luck to you - whatever you decide!

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I would work there until I had another mo' better job offer.

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Waiting until you have a new job sounds like a good plan. Or you could leverage a new job offer into a raise. If they say no, you're no worse off.

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I worked at my last place of employment for 11 years. The last two without a raise b/c of the economy and my company was losing tens-of-thousands of dollars every month. I was part of a huge company cut that saw 1/4 of the employees without jobs without notice.

Needless to say, be happy you have a job.

If you're lucky enough to be able to switch jobs or go to another place that will pay more...do it.

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So it's just good sense to wait until you've got an offer before moving on. We're in a market where a lot of your value isn't on how good a worker you are, sadly. Too many of us can be replaced too easily. It's an employer's market these days in most fields.

It seems like we switch jobs more; I've quit my last two jobs at about a year, which is much shorter than I like, but also seemed like the best call at the time. I've had offers for more money each time, though I have had to relocate (with young kids - hard) a couple of times. I guess my sense is that one year is probably the minimum but, three years with no advancement? It's probably time to move on, if the option is there. My main skill-set (digital analytics/big data) is in demand, so that makes things easier. You'll have to decide whether to stay put or not if the market you're in isn't good.

Never hurts to moonlight, too. There are lots of trades worth knowing. In a pinch, hang drywall, I always say =).

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@baybei: Seriously, try to find another job. If it's retail, and you can make money at it, then more power to you. I had a love/hate relationship with the retail sector, and if need be, I'd go back.
What's the worst that would happen? You'd be broke? I've been there. It's really not so bad. There's worse things than being broke or unemployed.

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Does your company offer a pay-for-performance plan? For example, you accomplish your goals and then you get to keep your job, exceed performance on your goals and you get compensated?

Some companies are offering bonuses in the last couple years instead of raises. This is because it's temporary and can be based on a budget given to the departments.

The economy plays a huge role in granting raises. The theory is if the cost of living doesn't increase, why should your salary?

Have you applied for a position with more responsibilities or are you just expecting a raise in your curent position without doing anything more? I've been the manager deciding who gets raises and who doesn't and it's not as easy as it looks. You can grant everyone a 0.5% increase or you can grant your high performers a 2% increase. What is the best decision for the company?

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I'd continue working there until I had another offer in hand. I was in a situation where there was no prospect of advancement - ever. I got basic raises and the like, but in the end I wasn't going anywhere. So I started applying around and found something where I do have advancement opportunities, and am getting my masters degree through the company.

It's a lot easier to find a job while employed! I wouldn't quit before I had the offer and a start date.

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You mentioned others don't use their health insurance - do you? If so, is it a chronic condition? You might then be able to file an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) claim based on Disability (or any of the other prohibited practices such as Age, Race, Color, National Origin, Sex, Religion or Reprisal). Maybe you're not getting a raise for any of these reasons, so again, an EEO complaint might be in order if you feel any of those factors enter into the mix. Yes, you might get fired, but then simply file a Reprisal complaint as well. Not suggesting you use EEO as a 'weapon', but take a good look to be sure you're being treated no differently then other employees. Look for a Hostile Work Environment as well. Don't necessarily need a lawyer - the company ought to have a counselor available to employees who feel they are being treated unfairly under the law. Check it out and exercise your rights.

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I think of jobs like I do cars. I'll stick with it until I find something more appealing. I also haven't gotten a performance increase at my job. Ever. They do give a "cost of living" increase.. but that's what it is, an increase for a rising cost of living. And, they do give various bonuses at the end of the year, but you can't depend on a bonus (didn't work well for Clark Griswold).

So, I feel for you. But, maybe you can negotiate some extra days off a year. Or a level of reimbursement for your travel. But, if you're not happy where you are, then maybe it's just time to move on. I stay where I am since it's really not that bad, although I'm completely offended I don't get performance increases.

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Health Insurance is a big plus.

If you have a tough time now and switch jobs, will you be able to find one which has it ?
You would have to consider how long before you will be covered. A lot of places have a 90 day or longer waiting period, which would be interesting if you got sick in the meantime.

The other thing to look at is if the new job doe's not have health insurance, will you be able to pay for it yourself ? I know it sucks to have a job where you feel you are worth more but you have to consider everything first !

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I'd work there, as long as it took me to find another job. I grew up believing that if you where loyal to a company they would be loyal to you. This may be true for friends and even other people but not companies. To survive they look out for the bottom line (99% at least). Get other, solid offers; get a promissory letter from those places and if you want to stay at you current job, go to them and negotiate. With that letter you have more negotiation power. If they say “well then go”, they where not looking out for your best interests.
Cont...

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It use to be b4 the "Great Recession" you would get a cost of living raise of 2-4% annually. But costs went up across the board and now people who own business can't afford to give cost of living raises, and people who work for businesses can't afford not to get them. Gas goes up, rent goes up, utilities go up, salaries go... and that is the problem.
Good luck. It sounds like you are a property manager of some kind. Try finding a bank that will help you into mortgages. Even if that is not what you want to do banking is a big industry and a foot in the door goes further in this business than many others. From the guy who has changed industries like 3 times.

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@computiac: Does Cobra help if you switch jobs or just when you're terminated from one?

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@philosopherott: I'm thinking just the opposite. With the current housing market, the cost of living has gone down. The average price for a house used to be $250,000 but now it's around $145,000. Also, the interest rates are significantly lower so your per month costs is lower.

If you're like most people, the cost of your home is the largest expense each month.

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Sounds like your boss has been keeping all the raise allotment and stiffing you. (Unless the company is self insuring, it doesn't cost more for health insurance if you use than if you don't. Group is the same for every person covered.) Time to search for another job, and with it in hand, face your boss and state you have been treated unfairly and are leaving because of it.

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I've been here going on four years and nothing. Hear about people here longer who have never gotten anything. Sucks but with the job market the way it is I can't switch and make what I'm making.

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When the pay you're getting is already lower than what you can comfortably live off of? Just long enough to find another job.

I'm in a similar situation. I took my current job as a "it's better than being unemployed" option. I'm paid minimum wage, but I was told that after 90 days with satisfactory work I'd get a raise. I'm nearing my 6 month marker and still no raise, despite being an excellent worker by all accounts. My raise request has been submitted multiple times, but the home office will not put it into effect.

SoI am going to continue working for this company just long enough to find another job, which will hopefully be within a week or so.

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Well, it looks like I'm sticking around for a while at least. I have some things I need to take care of that will require having some days here and there off, and it's easier to do this in a job I'm already established in.

As for the health insurance, I'm the only one that works for them that needs it (of the full-time site managers, other employees do use it). The other employees either use their spouses insurance or in the case of the one, his insurance that he still gets from IBM when he retired. It's not the best health insurance as it's a high deductible plan, and I would have to pay out of pocket to visit the doctor anyway, I'm half tempted to drop it.

I am what they call a site manager for a self-storage company. I'm responsible for pretty much everything that goes on. I rent units, sweep them when they vacate, keep the property clean (as well as the office), make them aware of maintenance issues, etc. I have thought of going to school for property management and
cont'd

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cont'd
managing an apartment complex or something similar.

I have no room for advancement. At least in retail I have room for advancement as I made it to acting manager of one of my jobs before I left. It wouldn't be hard to find a job in retail where I am, as they are almost always hiring, however I would no doubt be taking a pay cut initially.

I'm going to give them at least 6 months of this 'perk' and see if it's beneficial before I leave. There will be months I make a little extra, and months I make nothing extra.

The owners are not hurting for money. They own several office buildings, the storage facilities, laundromats and recently bought a historical building they converted to more offices.

I've done good for them at the site where I work the most as I brought them from in the mid 70's % rented to the low 80's% rented. Some of this is because I found out that a competitor about 15 minutes away had a fire and lost an entire building, I found a way to get their rentals.

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@purplefeather: Ah yes, that's the big problem. With what I make, I could not afford to rent an apartment, pay for all the utilities (90% of apartments around here you pay everything!), pay for gas and feed myself. I just don't bring home enough! It's almost embarrassing to say that in my late 30's I'm living with mom, and have never even had the money to think about moving out. Considering that gas has gone up, as has everything else I pay for (my own food and such), I couldn't fix my car when it failed inspection. By the time I get it fixed (hopefully next week), I'll have gone 3 weeks without a car. That's bad when you work 25 miles away 3 days a week, and one (sometimes two) of the other days I have to cross a bridge with a toll and it's about 12 miles away (not as bad!). A taxi would cost me more than I make working! Fortunately I've been able to get rides or borrow my moms car (she doesn't like to drive in the winter!) sigh

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@cengland0: I was thinking that so many people lost there homes or do to being laid off, could not purchase the home they where going to get as is the case in my area and many friends and family mambers. And as people loose their homes rent goes up.

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@cengland0: Housing prices and interest rates falling doesn't do a good goddamn for people already in a mortgage except put them underwater. It certainly doesn't lower your cost of living to find out your house you paid $250,000 for is now worth $75,000, but you still owe $150,000 on it. And once you get a mortgage you're locked in on that interest rate for however long the term of the mortgage is (well, unless you have a variable interest rate, but there are probably whole books on why that is a bad idea).
Not to mention the CPI has gone from 183 in 2003 to 231 in 2012. That's a 26% price increase in the average basket of goods.
Cost of living is definitely not going down anytime soon.

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@cengland0: But the cost of food and other goods has risen, 30% I think?

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It sounds like you're getting ripped off. Keep in mind, you are selling your time and your talents to the company you work for. Companies are more often greedy, self-entitled brats. Just try ballparking how much money the company might make off of your work and consider if you're getting a good deal. Be sure to factor in things like them being a reliable source of income ONLY if they do not fire people to increase profits. If they do that, then they are not offering you any more reliability than you would have doing your work freelance. I strongly encourage everyone to consider investigating freelancing through the Internet. If you have a skill, you will be able to sell your skill for far less than a big company could even if you pay yourself handsomely. And with the Internet, the entire world is your customer base. You will most likely not have much trouble reliably finding work. And your field matters less than you would think. Get creative.

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@baybei: If I were in your position I would start looking for another job. Looking for other jobs will also give you a rough idea of how much your current set of skills are worth. Just don't quit your current job until after you officially sign with another company. The job market is rough out there and new college graduates and new people everyday looking for work is not making it any easier.

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Depending on how big the company was and to what degree they were being douchers, I would quit and start a competing company for the sole purpose of putting them out of business. If I was very angry and they grossed less than 3 - 4 million in annual income, it wouldn't be too hard (as I would be sacrificing more for my malicious goal).

If you wanted to be even less pleasant, you could, over the course of several months, create the foundation for you to leave them, loudly, in a deeply wounded manner, concocting an evil strawman of the company. As you leave, you would no doubt gain much sympathy of the customers, whose loyalty you've worked hard to gain. That would allow you to pull them away when you form your competing company.

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You should work as long as you feel comfortable from a financial point of view. Having a career is not always the first thing that one should think about, if money is not enough.

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@okham: Trying to leverage a new job offer against your current job in hopes of forcing a raise seems like a good idea, but you really have to be prepared to leave your job and take that offer. Don't bring it forward unless you're really ready to leave, because angling for a change like that can cause some animosity if your intent is to stay. It might put you on the short list if cutbacks are coming or they might start looking to replace you first before you leave, just because they know you're looking.

I started looking for a new job (in Information Technology) 3 months ago and found a better job opportunity in mere days - had an offer in hand for 20% more money and better benefits within 2 weeks. Having been at my previous company for 8 years, it was hard to leave, but I'm happy I made the leap. It was scary at first, not knowing what to expect... but it turned out to be a great job all around. Don't let the fear of the unknown stop you from growing.

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NEVER TAKE A COUNTER OFFER! Your leverage will have created a ton of bad blood, and will NOT make you any friends where you're at. People understand moving on, people don't like what is perceived as a threat to get a raise. Chances are you'll be out of the company where you take that counter offer within a year.

Get another offer and bail, instead of trying to force that company's hand. It sounds like you're really turned off at that place anyway, so might as well take off.

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Others have offered some great practical advice. To address the other side of this, try to separate your indignation about the "fairness" of your situation from the pragmatic implications of leaving your job. I get caught in this; after "cutting off my nose to spite my face" too many times, I try to separate my annoyance from the implication for me: who or what is benefiting or being harmed from me refusing to do/doing something because the situation involves unfairness? Often the "benefit" is my sense of fairness and the "harm" is something that would hurt me: there's no consequence to the person/institution that is being unfair. I don't always succeed at this and I can get really, really annoyed in the process, but it helps me separate the emotional and pragmatic consequences of "fair." In this case, it sounds like it might be time to develop a longer-term plan to change jobs, but in the short-term, don't hurt yourself to prove a point to someone for whom there's no consequence.

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@baybei: @dmaz makes an excellent point. It sounds like you're at the heart of just about everything that goes on there and know the business inside and out.. Start up your own business! (assuming they didn't make you sign a non-compete.. and if they try to get you to sign one, don't :D)

Just out of curiosity, how much more responsibility and time does your boss put in than you? (Just curious what he's doing to deserve all of those perks/raises)

Like a lot of people have said, times are hard for quite a few people - but it doesn't sound like your employer is one of them. I obviously don't know the details but going on what you've said: You should get a raise.. or at the very least some kind of incentive bonus.

I was going say a couple more things but I gotta take off right now.. but it looks like people have given pretty good advice.

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Find a retail job that's comfortable and run---don't walk---away.

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Lots of good advice from others.
Don't quit the job you have before you have another one if the best advice.

Also: Nothing you explained that you provide your company sounds like it really makes you special and indispensable. So since your skill set isn't special, you really don't have much leverage and if you quit, someone else will gladly take your job and likely has your same qualifications. There are lots of people out of work which works to keep the employment market soft with more job seekers than available jobs. If you want to make more money you need to acquire training to elevate your skill set and make you more indispensable as an employee.

Also if your employers are property owners while it might seem like they are rolling in dough, they also may be underwater on their property values like many homeowners are. However since they own so many properties if a number of them are underwater it could be pretty bad for their net worth.

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@cengland0: That's only true if you own. Rents have been going up

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@kornkid42: You mean the rent is...
.
.
Too damn high?

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@portezbie: Oh, that's an interesting article. Apparently I need to think about moving out of the country!

As to whether or not they have money. I know they do, they are multi-millionaires and part of a family and part owners in a long owned family lumber yard that just bought several smaller hardware stores and lumber yards out. This family owns more properties in my county than I had realized. Trust me, they wouldn't be continuing to buy/build/improve if they weren't making money and lots of it. These guys are extremely intelligent, and not only know how to make money, but apparently not lose it. They don't do anything foolishly!

Skills or not, my boss doesn't want me leaving. Someone teased once that I was trying to get fired, she said that would never happen. Probably because it's so difficult to get someone to work the store I work 3 days a week, and I am the only one that works 4 out of their 5 stores, no one else will.