questionsdo you have odd reasons for refusing to buy a…

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I would never buy a car from one the companies that used slave labor during the holocaust.

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While not a flat out refusal, I rather not buy FWD. And I still prefer a manual over an automatic.

That pretty much rules out the majority of new cars, doesn't it? RWD with a stick shift ... yeah, yeah, call me old. AND GET OFF MY LAWN!

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If you regularly get gas someplace like Costco with only one direction to approach the pump, you are actually better off with the gas cap on the passenger side. There are more cars with the gas cap on the driver's side (my unscientific poll on one single Costco gas attendant has it at about 2/3rds driver's side, 1/3rd passenger side). Mine is on the driver's side and there's always a long line for the pump while the passenger side pumps sit empty. Half the time I just go to the wrong pump and drag the darned thing across my car rather than wait for the more convenient pump.

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I won't buy any vehicle (assuming i'm not simply paying cash for it) that uses chase bank as it's finance backer. My reasons are plenty, but the long and short of it is that i simply can't support, or through indirect action allow my business to flow to a company as corrupt as jpmchase.

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I don't like any Ford because the Ford family owns the Lions and employed Matt Millen for too long.

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Camry. If there is an accident, a bottleneck or someone mindlessly tooling around the roads when I am in a hurry to get somewhere I'll put my money on a Camry every time.

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@narfcake: Is it for fuel economy reasons that you prefer a stick shift? Or do you just like the feel of it better?
I know RWD delivers more acceleration than FWD at the cost of less control.

OT: I don't know if the reason counts as "odd" but after my most recent car I won't buy anything without an aux jack for my mp3 player or anything larger than a compact (they're so much easier to park and I rarely have more than one passenger).

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@narfcake:
bmw
Mercedes
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Miata ;)

j5 j5
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@j5: Does Mercedes sell any manuals in the USA? I don't think I've ever seen a single one.

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Large vehicles.

I'm 36 and hate driving my grandmother's 2001 cadillac fleetwood V8 - so I cram her in my 2011 mini clubman S when I take her to lunch.

:-)

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Poor interior design would be my deal breaker. If a car feels cheap, uncomfortable or has a dumb layout, you can count me out.

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@stryker4526: the C series did for a while, not sure now.

j5 j5
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@moondrake: Do you remember the cars that had the gas cap hidden behind the rear license plate? I wouldn't buy one of those. :)

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I will not buy any GM products, nice cars though they may be. GM and their UAW union bullied their way into a sweetheart of a government buy-out deal. Ford did not. Although Ford had lots of problems, they chose to finance their own restructuring. Therefore I currently own a Ford and some stock to boot.

On another note, I dislike Automatic Transmissions more than I dislike FWD. Whenever possible, all my future cars shall be stick-shift.

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I find Toyotas to be mind-numbingly boring. I would generally rather walk to work than risk falling asleep at the wheel driving a Corolla or Camry.

Whenever possible I buy a RWD car because they handle and accelerate better, though there just aren't many options for that on the US market right now.

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@jsimsace: I've seen that on several Corvettes. Some models had a trap door on the top of the trunk instead, but either way Chevy has generally placed the Corvette gas cap in the center line of the car.

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Hyundai. Any Hyundai vehicle. Buddy does oil changes on them at his independent shop and the oil comes out like sludge. Plus they're over stylized... Gonna look like Pontiacs in a few years now.

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Any car with the fuel door release button in the friggin glovebox. (Haven't seen this in years - but man, that was annoying to try to figure out when I borrowed a friend's car.)
No coupe hatchback or super sloped rear glass - enough time working at the tow yard showed me that those things are death traps. Literally.

But my real arbitrary thing - must have heated seats. Never cared about that before I lived where it actually got cold.

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@lparsons42: Actually FWD cars handle better.
RWD do accelerate better though.

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I won't buy a Lexus until they are able to run on grahm crackers (their ads claim that the lexus can run on any imaginable fuel... so, when they can run on grahm crackers, and their ads are not a complete falsehood, I'll consider one).

Of course, if someone gave me one for free... I'd get over their false advertizing in a hurry.

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@stryker4526: I heartily disagree. Handling is completely determined by the suspension geometry, and is also a performance benchmark, not safety. Will you assert that a front wheel drive camry is outhandling a corvette z06? Your statement perpetuates myth created by a few decades of advertising. If you said "safer" instead of "handles better" in terms of the average joe driver - i'd be siding with you.

For the average driver - front wheel driven cars will be safer at or near their limits, and especially in adverse weather, when compared to rear drive. That said - ask a driver with competitive, emergency response, or other scenario-specific driving training- what format they'd rather be in entering a blind turn too fast. front wheelers will generally understeer - which means you're aiming at a guardrail no matter what you try to do to correct. rwd can get you out of sticky situations if you can safely control oversteer - but again, we're not talking average joes anymore.

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Both formats have their generalities, and exceptions of course.. but the world's best handling cars are most certainly not front wheel drives. a rwd pickup truck will lose hands down to almost any front wheel driver car in terms of handling.. but that goes back to the suspension geometry and design that was mentioned earlier. You can create a wonderful handling fwd vehicle, or a terrible handling one with suspension alone. If you're driving at 70% of the cars' potential, and take two similar vehicles, one rwd, and one front wheel, assuming both are sporty and have similar suspensions - you'd be hard press to notice much of a difference. The big differences happen closer to the limits - and i'd still say the comment on handling isn't corrent. SAFER, sure.. better handling? nope.

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@goatcrapp: For me, it's not so much the handling, but what happens in snow. RWD cars in snow are more of a handful for a daily driver than a comparable FWD

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Everyone here is missing the point. The OP said odd reasons. What most of you people listed were practical reasons.

Here are examples of odd:
I will never buy a Lexus, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Audi, Infiniti, Porsche and all the other more exotic sports car makes. Why? I don't want people to think I'm a total jerk-off. I don't care if people think I'm poor, because I am. Even if I won the lottery, I still wouldn't do it. Frankly, I don't want to associate with someone who judges me by the car I drive anyway.

I won't buy a car with headrests that can be removed. Why? I have this irrational fear that a passenger or someone trying to carjack me will take it off and stab the metal rods through my neck.

I won't buy a car that has, by default, VSA/ESC forced. Why? Again, based on an irrational fear, but I can't get over the idea that these cars will rise up and kill me. I've driven with these on and noticed the engine/braking become significantly different to the point of irking me.

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@lumpthar: They didn't "bully" their way into anything, and that bailout pretty well saved the American auto industry and saved a hell of a lot of jobs in the midwest (where I grew up and still live), so watch it before you go spouting off ignorant junk like that.
Not to mention the car companies have paid off the loans they got already.

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@goatcrapp: I live in Florida and on December 23, 1990 it snowed. The snow melted and then re-froze. This put a nice layer of ice on the road.

On my way to work, there were hundreds of cars in the ditches. The problem was the Floridians were not prepared for ice on the roads. So now you have the car that makes the difference.

If you push your car from the back (RWD), it's much easier to slide around and those were the cars in the ditch. The cars being pulled from the front (FWD) mostly made it safely -- not all of course.

RWD is excellent if you plan on racing your car because when you accelerate the weight transfers to the rear of the car and you get better traction. A FWD car in high acceleration will spin it's tires more easily.

So give this a try one day. Take a wagon and push it with the handle and see how hard it is to control. Next, use it properly by pulling it by the handle and you will then understand.

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@stryker4526: It is factually inaccurate to say that FWD cars handle better.

For average drivers, they handle easier, but not better. FWD cars are characteristically plagued by oversteer as a result of having the drive wheels also steer the car. They also need to be weighted in the trunk in order to achieve a decent front/rear weight distribution.

RWD, on the other hand, tends to only slightly understeer unless the drive wheels break loose. Weight distribution is much improved by having the drive wheels at the rear instead of everything at the front.

FWD handling is easier for novice driver, as there is more weight over the drive wheels. However it is less stable at higher speeds - when hopefully novice drivers don't need to make many significant course adjustments.

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Toyota...

All of their cars are basically driving appliances... They get the job done, and not much else. Uninspired beige conformity for the masses. If I'm going to drive a car I want to at least be able to have a bit of fun. At least my Mazda 3 has a 6-speed MT and handles like a go cart. That little thing sure is fun to toss around corners. It's no Impreza WRX, which I traded in for it, but it also returns gas mileage in the mid-thirties on regular gas, even with me pounding on it.

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Chrysler, because the dealer treated my mom like a 'woman who did not know anything'.

Over 30 years ago.

Ironically we both purchased vehicles form that dealer this year for our first time. But Chrysler still has that negative connotation in the back of my head and we bought an Oldsmobile.

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@cengland0: Bad analogy, what you describe has the steering at the back, much like driving in reverse.
In inclement conditions, having the drive in front only allows traction under acceleration due to extra weight on the driven wheels, and is more likely the cause of all those vehicles in the ditch you described.
For a RWD vehicle (Front engine), you still have the engine weight over the steering wheels, so steering traction is the same.
Here's my own anecdote: the last time we got a decent snow here (2 feet), I was able to successfully navigate my RWD pickup 15 miles home weaving around skidding and or stranded SUVs and FWD cars.
@goatcrapp has it correct.

j5 j5
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Will not purchase GM vehicles....commonly known as Obama Motors.

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@curtisuxor: I don't have any unusual reasons for boycotting a car type. One of the reasons I chose my car is unusual-- it provides extra safety for my dog when he rides in the back seat. I looked at the back seat safety measures on all the cars in the class I was shopping for and my Honda Civic won in the "keep my dog alive in an accident" department, especially when we are traveling and he is wearing his seat belt harness which keeps him toward the middle of the seat. I selected the coupe over the 4 door model because the way the passenger seat slides forward makes it much easier for my Great Dane to step from the floor to the back seat than the rear door option where he has to climb right onto the seat rather than stepping onto the floorboard and up. The last of the dog-friendly elements of my Honda is that there's no hump in the back floor, making it more comfortable for him to sit with his butt on the back seat and his feet on the floor looking out the windshield.

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@cengland0: i know all about the physics of drive systems. What you're describing is still related to safety or ease of use - not handling which is a performance bench mark. Had the original statement contained the qualifier "better handling in the snow" i wouldn't have bothered correcting - but most people make the mistake of confusing a measure of safety or predictability, with a measure of performance, and strictly speaking (in industry terms, since i've been in the automotive industry) that simply isn't correct.

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@goatcrapp: I'd argue that "better handling in the snow" still goes to RWD, for the correct driver.

j5 j5
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@stryker4526: Don't take it personally. Breathe.
The fact is that GM had a sizeable portion of their loan package forgiven early on when the "Old GM" (Motors Liquidation Corporation - look it up) and "New GM" split. Had that not happened, "New GM" would have never been able to control its balance sheet and pay off the remaining loans.

In my opinion the gross mismanagement at the "Old GM" allowed them to effectively hold the economy and the Treasury Department hostage by threatening to completely liquidate their industry and idle tens of thousands of employees at "Old GM" and their subsidiaries and suppliers.
In my opinion the "Old GM" management said, "We created an enormous mess. We can't control it any more. Unless you give us lots of money, we will make the economy suffer. We're too big to fail."

Notice carefully that Chrysler Corp has not yet been mentioned. I was in favor of their bailout plan. Daimler pretty well screwed them over.

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KIAs because it spells Killed In Action...

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@moondrake: I still contend that your reasons are very practical, albeit a tad unusual. Do you have one of those doggy-proof (bodily function-proof) backseat covers? I saw those on infomercials and was curious if anyone bought them.

Also, about the No Va thing, do you remember one of the movies where one of the characters said this? For the life of me, I cannot recall the title. I'm leaning towards a Tarantino film because it seems like his non-sequitur type of dialogue.

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@curtisuxor: Oh, very practical, but an uncommon reason. When I took the car in for a recall on the visors I had the dog with me and the salesmen made much of him, so I showed them the reasons why I bought the car and they were glad to get a new angle to use in pitching their vehicles. I don't have one of those commercial covers, because they are usually dark colored and plaid. I live in the desert so no dark colors., please My seats are light tan so I bought a thin blanket in the same color as my seat and cut holes in it for the headrest posts and seat belts. It's just to protect the seats from hair and nails, he's no more likely to "have a bodily function" in the car than I am. It also covers the floorboard, so four years later the back seat is still pristine. And you have to really look to see that the seat has a blanket on it, as it is all tucked in around the edges and the same color as the upholstery.

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@j5: I can match your analogy with my own. I live in a place known for ~100 inches of snow / year. I moved out here with a 1995 Mustang GT with 4.10 rear end gears (more torque at any engine speed). The first winter came and a colleague of mine had a brand new Subaru 5-door (not a WRX or anything exceptional). He had all-season tires on his car, but I put really good snow tires on just in time for the first big snowfall.

When the first big snowfall hit we both tried to move our cars from one parking lot at work to a different one that was much closer, which included driving up a steep hill that had not been fully plowed. My car made it up the hill, he had to find a different way to the parking lot in his car. The tires made a world of difference - we were both driving manual trannys, too.

Later that winter I drove same Mustang through a snow squall on the interstate - visibility around 10 feet. Slowed down to 10-15mph for it and counted the SUVs in the ditch to the other side.

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@moondrake: One of my dogs gets quite carsick, so while I don't worry about either of my dogs eliminating in the car, protecting the interior from vomit and being able to easily clean out vomit is definitely a concern for me. :) I have two light colored blankets that I found at Target; they're marketed as "pet covers for sofas," and I cut seatbelt holes.

I also purchased my most recent car with an eye towards the safest/least-vomit-inducing-ride-possible for my dogs. There were a set of human-safety-features, most of which protect the dogs too!, that I considered first, and then within my desired safety features/budget/size, I considered what would be best for the pups. :)