questionsany serious runners here? what shoes do you wear?

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i was literally just searching this, i had adidas but i'm switching to a pair of saucony that i have, hoping they are easier on the knees

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I'm not the biggest runner in the world, but I did go to a running store to get my shoes, and the guy analyzed how I walked, ran, and jumped, and then brought me a pair of Brooks. He hit the nail on the head-they're easily the best running shoes I've ever owned. From running, to racquetball, to light hiking they're still as perfectly comfortable as the day I got them 3 years ago. Highly recommend trying some on. They're pricey, but worth it.

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I'm afraid I'm one of those people who like the Vibrams. I don't care what others may think of their appearance. I like the benefits of wearing them for running.
When I'm at home, I'm usually barefooted, so swapping over to the five fingers was a no brainer. I definitely notice a marked difference in my footfall and stride. I've also eliminated the nerve pain in my right buttock to upper thigh (sciatic nerve?) that persisted no matter the brand of running shoes I used prior to switching to Vibrams. Maybe it's all in my head, but at least it's no longer a pain in my fanny.

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Quailman is right about figuring out what kind of shoe you need. That's more important than brand or model. But I will say this: I have never owned Reebok shoes that have lasted worth a darn.

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@quailman: Thank you. Looks like I should head to a running store.

I am supposed to run a 10k in two months' time and I have no clue... I am up to 7k now, but the last 3k is a little painful...

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I started wearing Asics in high school with the GT-2080. I've been getting shoes from this line every year since then. Are there better shoes ou there? Probably. However, they have not let me down in 9 years and I love that I can just buy them online and know that they will fit me perfectly. I always get the previous years' model since being behind a year in shoe technology isn't a big deal with me. Doing this will put you in the sub $100 range. Try on a pair at the store and see what you think. That is assuming you meant trainers, right?

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I definitely agree with the "go to a running store" advice. I have a pair of Asics and Saucony's and I just got a pair of Brooks a month ago to replace the Asics. I use insoles as well - that is almost as important as the shoes sometimes. I didn't get new insoles with one pair and I started to get ankle issues - put the insoles in and they went away. but that was what the running store prescribed for my particular gait. And another thing to note is that regardless of the type of shoe they recommend, there are usually multiple levels of price for that type. I have always done fine with the lowest cost of the style I use (I use Neutral and compensate with insoles).

My local running store will allow a 2 week trial - see if you can find one near you with a similar policy. I once bought a pair that seemed great in the store but after one run I realized they rubbed my ankles so bad that I couldn't wear them. Glad to get that $100 back.

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This question sounded familiar, so I searched and found these answers on a similar question.

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I'm another asics person myself, but going to a store that has someone who knows what they're talking about sounds like a good idea. Everyone's different.

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I've been running in my five fingers, it was hard to get started with them but I will never run in anything again. I usually run 3 to 4 times a week.

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vivo barefoots, great shoes, though it was hard at first because i had to build up different muscles

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I wear Vibram Five Fingers as well. Vibrams make you use different muscles in your leg and foot for running, so it's tiring at first, but once I got used to them I found I had more stamina. I've found the giant heel-cushion on running shoes actually limits the spring in my stride. With the Vibrams my heel is free to extend further before contracting for the push forward.

Not that everyone has to buy vibrams, but it's a good injury prevention measure to move away from the heel-strike running style. Heel-striking is very high impact. With barefooted running you're landing on the outside of the balls of your feet, and rotating inward, and that rotation will lower the impact of landing.

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I'm not really an avid runner, but I have a pair of Vibram Bikilas and I love them! I wear them a lot, not just for running. They are actually really comfortable and I personally don't think they look that weird.

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I use Asics GT-2150's. I'm on my second pair of them, used them in my first marathon last year. I also own a pair of the GT-2160's, but for whatever reason, it wasn't the same fit. I know the GT-2170's are now available (a $100-110 pair of shoes), but I'm probably likely going to search Amazon for another pair of GT-2150's in my size ($50-60).

I'll add to the chorus of going to a serious running store for guidance. I went to a Finish Line or some other mall store with my brother-in-law, and they seemed bent on selling him inserts, more than concerned about the fit of the shoes themselves. We left that place.

A solid running store will have people invested in assessing how you run and finding the right pair of shoes for you, whether Vibrams or a regular running shoe. It can make all the difference in your running and making sure you don't get hurt.

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i noticed the topic of knees come up. I run... average about 20 miles a week... but thats a sharp drop from where i was(down from about 30, just a couple of years ago, and a few years before that, 30 miles was a lazy week.) due to knee problems, and age.

saucony was always my shoe of choice, and still among the least damaging traditional sneaker, IMO, but i've since changed to vibram five fingers (have the kso and bakilla) - the forced change in running style (and indeed a much more natural running gait) has helped tremendously with my knees, and i'm on the upswing with distance and durability for the first time in a few years.

I'm also in love with the new balance minimus (which uses a sole made by vibram - very durable and flexible, but in a more traditional sneaker's package.) The thin-ness works you into a more natural gait also, so this is the shoe for you if you are freaked out by the gorilla feet that the vibram shoes give you lol. Also very easy on the knees.

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There is no such thing as the "best" running shoe. It is the best shoe for you, which will depend greatly upon your running stride, type of running you do, how much you do, how much you weigh, and the shape of your foot.

I started out running Brooks, but then they started to have serious quality issues, then I moved to Asics, then to Mizuno, now back to Asics. I'm pretty happy with them: I have two pair that I switch out. I'll be having to replace them both pretty soon (they have almost 300 miles each).

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Asics GT 2000/2100 series. Asics naturally fits a wider foot and this is the the go to standard for mild to moderate over pronators (more than 75% of runners over pronate to some extent). Been wearing them since 2005.

I've tried some comparable Saucony's and they have been fine, but I like the Asics better.

My advice, go to a running store and find out your foot type, then buy online or at another sporting good's store. Or, take your current shoes and look at the wear pattern. If your wear is moderately to heavily biased to one side, it means you're over or under pronating and the shoe isn't correcting it. Check out this little image:

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Adidas Supersonic Sequences. Got them from my local running store. They've been through a couple of marathons and a 50 mile ultra. Still using them after an estimated 1000 miles.

It's worth noting that they were slightly uncomfortable at first but the discomfort went away after several weeks of light running. Some people say you should never have to break in shoes if you have the right shoes, but I say you're going to experience some pain with any shoe if you're just starting to get into long distance running. Ease into it.

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I am a trail runner, so most traditional shoes don't work for me. I use Merrell Chameleon for medium to hard grade, New Balance 572 (easy-medium grade), and Keen for expert grade. I haven't tried the Vibrams 5 fingers, but all the Keen and Merrell have Vibrams soles.

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@lavikinga: My girlfriend (avid runner and marathon participant) experienced the same thing. Her success with Vibrams is having me consider using them in my fitness classes.

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@meh3884: Before I switched to Vibrams, Asics GT were my favorite. However because of a slight supination of my left ankle, trying to solve the problem for one leg caused problems in the other after I got some wear on the shoes. With the minimal support shoes, that is no longer a problem. They're definitely not for every one. I've a new pair of a trail version that I'm really looking forward to trying out. A bit more padding underneath will help me not feel the gravel, I hope.