questionsdoes anyone else have to put up with the students…

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I have to put up with it. I work at a university with 12,000 or so students. More than anything, it's the insane number of bad drivers. Either stupidly dangerous (there's accidents almost every day), or unusually slow (main road through town is 45mph, many go 30). For a town of around 20,000 it's a really big jump in driving traffic all the time when school is in session.

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You're not alone. I work at a large university, and long for the months of summer and winter break when I have much less traffic and fewer "students of higher education" walking out in front of my car. :/

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I could see how that could be a drag. But think of all the great things the college hipsters bring with them. Like, ah, uh, um. OK, I see your point.

And get off my lawn!!!!

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i used to. the worse part is, i worked on the local ambulance service. we had to pick up drunk college kids all the time. always dreaded homecoming. it was pretty much non-stop calls from 11am-2am.

although, i will admit that drunk college kids are really fun to mess with.

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There are a plethora of schools here in Seattle, but luckily I managed to live in a neighbourhood a decent way away from all of them.

Actually what is worse here is the high school students from several private schools here in downtown that flood the food courts and small restaurants at lunch time. Easy enough to avoid by going somewhere that doesn't serve fast food, but sometimes you just want some mall noodles from Thai Go! :P

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I work in a town where the census population is about 10,000 and enrollment at the university is about 7,000. I went to that school for three years and I used to live in town. There is always an adjustment period when the students come back, when there is more traffic, crowded stores, etc. but everyone seems to get used to it. With such a big proportion of students it's something you just have to deal with.

I might feel differently if I still lived in town and had to see more drunken antics, but just working here, the students really don't bother me. Then again, I am only a few years removed from college myself, and I may feel differently some years down the road.

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Yeah, I too live in a college town. 14,000 students and town is 15,000 ppl without them. So it doubles in size. I also work with college students so I interface with them alot. They do bring money to the town and help the economy but there is also alot more traffic and accidents here when school is in session. I live away from campus and do find it annoying when the partying students find their way into working family neighborhoods. There is a Fraternity that rented a house across the street and while the guys that live there are fine, the people that go to their parties could care less about who they wake up or where they leave their trash. :/ or where they decide to take a potty break at :(
There are lots of great college students however, the ones I work with do alot to help out in the community and on campus. They make it a better place to be at.

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Technically I'm in a college town. TCU is just a few miles away. But with an enrollment of just over 8,000 in a city of almost 800,000 (and that's just in the city proper, doesn't count the rest of the DFW metroplex...including the D part) and the campus being fairly compact, it's not a big deal for me.
I do know that there are a few restaurants I want to avoid on certain weekends (home football games, parents' weekend, graduation weekends, etc) and there's a bit more foot traffic in the immediate area of campus. But, other than that and a few bit of an influx of students at church on Sundays it's not really noticeable.

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I live near a small college town (13,000 students/15,000 other people). I've had pretty much the same experience as everyone else here, the traffic doubles, accidents sky-rocket, restraunts fill up (good for the local business atleast), somebody inevidably gets stabbed every home-coming, and its generally a pain in the butt to go anywhere down-town. Writing this, while true, somehow makes me feel old and crotchety, I was in that college only five years ago.

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Yes, but only when I have to visit my daughter at the uni. Or when she comes home with 50 of her closest friends. Or when they (daughter and friends) call because they need something. All in all, I am glad she is 4 hours away while she figures out this "living on my own" thing. It is much easier to field phone call, texts, and emails than her physical person when she needs money.

I only ever lived in a college town when I was in uni. I can not imagine having to deal with that on a permanent basis.

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@ki4rxm: I don't know many college kids with money. They may exist, but they are a rare breed.

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@pyxientx: Most of them have money from their parents, it is just cool to pretend to be poor and do poor people things like drink PBR. My favorite part is the cost of PBR has skyrocketed since it has become a hipster beer, yet they still drink it even though not-cool beer is cheaper.

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@eraten: Having been a colege student over 20 years ago, AND having a current college student, I can honestly say, no. Most kids do not have money from their parents. My daughter gets $ 50 a month and health ins. She is lucky to get that. Her father just gives her a hard time, even though he could afford to send her some money. Most of her friends are in the same boat. Hell, I remember thinking having mac and cheese instead of ramen noodles was a feast.

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@ki4rxm: Yea, I know. I've been on both sides. The influence of the institution tends to be confined to a few areas and businesses. If you happen not to be involved in them, all you see is the bad stuff, like the traffic, disruption, and chaos.

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I lived in a college town for 5 years, when I was in college. Even though it's been several years now, I still remember thinking at the time, that any resident who bought a house near campus really had no right to complain about noise/congestion/etc. I'm sure my perspective might be different today than it was 10-15 years ago, but I think there is a valid point there. If you live on the opposite side of town, and the college kids have gradually expanded outward and now are taking over your neighborhood, then I see your point, and you have a valid complaint. But if you bought a house in an area that already had a good number of students, then I think you knew (or should have known) what you were getting into. Just my two cents.

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Oh yeah... The annual migration of the unwashed masses has finished... Something in the area 70,000 moved in last week...

For over 20 years I have worked in the center of the College Universe in Boston MA...
I deal with students from MIT, Harvard, BU, BC, Berkley School of Music, Northeastern, UMass Boston, Lesley, Bentley, Wentworth, Suffolk, and literally hundreds of other smaller institutions based in and around Boston....

Some of the kids are great and I wish them the best, but a lot are horrible little monsters who ruin it for everyone....

Observations from over the years....
More money than brains, short attention span, entitlement issues, no work experience, think that they are impervious to damage caused by walking into moving traffic... Do not understand the concept of NO... Think that anywhere is their trash can / toilet, etc...

Undergrads can not read..
Grad students can read but can not comprehend..
Post Grad students can read and comprehend, they just don't care...

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@pyxientx: $50 a month doesn't seem like much at all.

Where I go to school, I spend about $8 a day on food.
Having less than $2 to live on seems pretty unreasonable.

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@akshat7: She has a meal plan for food. The $50 is all I can afford after paying all my bills and her health insurance. Besides, she is old enough to work, and does.

FYI: Meals where she goes are about $8 a meal. So be thankful it only costs you that a day.

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@pyxientx: Not necessarily money from their parents, but if they're college students, then money for their education is coming from somewhere (probably from the ether that is the loan system). Point is, the university itself gets that money, and that money pays (probably) the salaries of many of the "non-college folks" in the college town. All of that without the food-, drink-, and crap-buying power that the students themselves have.

I was the college student in this situation: city of 50,000 with a university of 26,000 students and 1,300 faculty members.

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I have more than one college near where I live. Not only is there an influx in idiotic kids that don't know how to cross the street or drive, but I also have to rent storage units to them when they leave for breaks. I can't even tell you what half the stuff some of them have left behind is, and their I'm better than you attitudes...oy, I want to smack half of them!

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I travel to one every week for work. They passed a law last year that allows the pedestrians (mostly the students) to cross a street from between parked cars. If you hit the pedestrian or not give them the right of way, regardless of how/where they were crossing, the driver gets a ticket. These students barely look up to see if a car is coming and just walk out into moving traffic, blocking up everything. Many times it seems like they cross on purpose to make a point that your have to stop for them.

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@mellielou: That is exactly what some of them do.. Some will even flip you off after wandering into moving traffic...