questionsdo you know your neighbors?

vote-for63vote-against
vote-for9vote-against

I know my neighbors are a$$holes, and that's all i care to know.

vote-for20vote-against

I made a point to introduce myself to my neighbors when my wife and I first moved here. It's important to not only know who lives next door to you, but to know if you can rely on them to keep an eye on things when you're out of town.

It just so happens that the neighbor across the street from me is rather nosey. It has a downside, like when I go outside and work on projects because I feel like he's staring. On the upside, he's harmless and I know that no one would be able to break into my house without him knowing about it. There's a trade-off but I think it's worth it.

The neighbor next door is a lot like me, but 30 years from now. He's got a few kids, but they're much older than mine. He works from home as well and he likes to work on projects. I can see us getting along for years to come

vote-for8vote-against

My neighbors are rednecks. I've talked to them on occasion, but we have absolutely nothing in common. When I lived in the city, my neighbors would sometimes come over when I was hosting a party (an almost daily occurrence back then).

Then there was the time I had an apartment, and all my neighbors were girls from the college softball team. We got along great. Once, my roommate and I went upstairs while they were out, and turned all of their furniture upside down. It took them about 5 seconds to realize who was responsible. lol...good times.

vote-for9vote-against

We know our neighbors on one side but not the other and not for lack of trying, they just intentionally avoid eye contact and won't respond to being spoken to. Yes, it IS weird living next to them.

vote-for11vote-against

I know about as much about my current neighbors as I'd like to. I can tell through the arguments that I can hear in my house from down the street that I would rather not associate with them.

I used to LOVE my neighbor at a previous house I rented. We called him pop-pop and would collect cans for him and bring him baked goods, and he would shovel our driveway, even when we insisted that he not.

vote-for7vote-against

I know my neighbors, but I'm not great friends with any of them. I'm going to be getting new neighbors on one side soon. I'm a little worried because I really like the woman who lived there. The neighbor on the other side of me is weird, but she is a good neighbor. We know quite a few of the other people on our street, mostly because our kids know each other.

vote-for12vote-against

About once a month the cops knock on my door looking for /asking about/ wanting to know if I have heard the latest commotion from my across-the-street neighbor's juvenile delinquent son. Two years ago he tried to burn down their house by shooting off fireworks in the garage. Yep, inside the garage. Yes, fireworks in a garage make a loud noise but the 5 fire truck sirens were a lot louder.

His mother thinks he's cute and this is just a "stage" that he is going through.

Edit: The rest of my neighbors are very nice.

vote-for8vote-against

I live in a cul-de-sac and I know the people who also live in it. I was HOA President for 4 years, so I know a few others from that. And, I know a few from being a local firefighter (make sure to change the batteries in your smoke detectors, folks!). But, I'm not "friends" with any of them. At most, generally, it's a nod and a wave while driving by.

Funny enough, one day I was finishing a jog, and walking by a house across the street, 3 houses up. The woman who lived there, for some reason, thought I was her lawn guy. She started asking me about her lawn.

vote-for7vote-against

I know most of them. Mostly retired people that are a lot older than I am. It works for me because I have to get up early for work and they never make any noise after dark.

vote-for7vote-against

I live on an Air Force base and I've met one of my neighbors one time so I know to say hi when I see her. I've never met her husband and I don't think I'd know them if I saw them in the store. I've never exchanged a word with my other neighbors and I've lived in this house for over a year.

vote-for7vote-against

I kinda know my neighbors on one side and one across the street. We say "Hi" when we see each other and occasionally chat or ask questions of each other when we're out and about. But, we don't socialize or anything like that.
I'd like to know my neighbors better but it's difficult as we don't have a lot in common and no one is out and about much in my neighborhood. Makes it harder to really get to know people.

vote-for12vote-against

Growing up in Queens, the parents were together every summer night on someone porch. The beauty of houses close together, you can hear your kids if the bedroom window is open.
We went on a few vacations with groups of neighbors.
When the kids were gone, the parents went to close by resorts a few weekends a year.

On Long Island, my in laws said hello to the neighbors. Nothing more. Part of that was them, but it didn't look like any of the neighbors were close.

Now, on Long Island we are friendly with the neighbors. Nothing like it was in Queens. Hi, how are things?, Bye. That is it.
In wealthy neighborhoods, it is common to not talk to neighbors at all.

People with dogs talk to other people with dogs. That is it.

vote-for8vote-against

I live in Seattle and I've actually met a lot of my neighbors. I have at least a couple now that I would trust to watch my dog while I'm away.

I think it's all about intent. When living with my family- we always knew the people around us since my mom made it a point to. When I went to college I wanted to be a hermit so I closed off a lot of that. Now that I'm in a new city and in a place I like, I'm wanting to meet people so I talk to people I run into and it's working out pretty well.

vote-for8vote-against

I know a couple of them but not all.

vote-for8vote-against

@agingdragqueen: I'm in my hermit stage and have been for the past 27 years, which is equal to how long I've been alive, haha. I've just never been a social person. I't too awkward and shy.

With that being said, I have said "hi" to a couple of the neighbors a couple of times, but haven't tried to get to know them. I never know what to say to people.

vote-for7vote-against

You mean the creepy guy who is always smoking in his backyard? The guy I always see every time I open the back curtains? I knew his name at one time... Now he's just "that creepy smoking guy".

vote-for7vote-against

New Englanders have a reputation for being "cold". I was born and grew up there, and wherever I lived, I found the neighbors very friendly and welcoming.

In Florida, pretty much everyone is from somewhere else. In the area where I live, there are a great many people from the midwest whom I found to be very friendly indeed. I have made a lot of friends here, but people do come and go (some in cars, by plans, trsins, and sadly boxes) and there are always new folks moving in and around.

In my particular neighborhood, I knew no one except for 1 or 2 neighbors in the general vicinity on the street. However, when I adopted my dog, I met a lot of people - dog people are friendly and you really get too know them. However, my neighborhood has recently undergone an almost 60% turnover in homes due to the various reasons listed above, and I find that the new people who have moved in are not as friendly - speak to them, and you barely get an answer.

vote-for4vote-against

Contd I do not, however, want to be involved in any major way with any of my neighbors other than to exchange pleasantries or be of help if I can be - so I am perfectly OK with that at this point in my life.

vote-for8vote-against

I am the only Anglo in an old Hispanic neighborhood, so it took a while to get to know my neighbors. I like the "front porch" lifestyle of the neighborhood, it just took them a while to accept me. I am talk-over-the-fence friendly with one side, I used to like the old man that lived on the other side but he died and a passel of younger people moved in with the old lady and now it is mostly screaming fights and empty beer cans over there. I worry for her but have nothing concrete. I am smile-and-wave friendly with the three houses across the street. I walk my dog every night in my neighborhood and being enormous (waist tall, 140lbs) he is kind of a celebrity so I am chatty with just about every family and all the kids on our 3 mile walking path. Since I live alone, I figure it makes me and the dog safer for people to know us, especially since we are both fish out of water.

vote-for7vote-against

I live in, lets call it an up and coming neighborhood. I try to steer clear of the neighbors and I'm sure they think that we are just some crazy white kids so they tend to steer clear of us.

The day we moved in, we met a nice family beside us and we occasionally exchange pleasantries but not much else. Another neighbor approached us later that day and offered to sell me illicit substances "I'll hook you up fatty yo!" Needless to say I do avoid them.

The last neighbor we met was an older gentleman, mid 50's who lives with what appears to be his kid and baby-momma. He told us that he likes how we are quiet and keep to ourselves and he let us know that "everyone looks out for each other around here. we got your back." I thought that was quite nice.

So even though none of us know each other on a first name basis, we all respect each others privacy.

vote-for9vote-against

"Kramer, I don't wanna stop and talk with everyone, every time I go in the building. I just wanna nod and be on my way." - Jerry Seinfeld

I feel the same way.

vote-for5vote-against

I live in the same neighborhood that my family moved to when I was 2 years old. I live around 'the block' from the home I grew up in, so I pretty much know who lives in every house all the way around the block and for a few other streets, and if I don't know who lives there now, I know who used to live there.

I can't say I'm friends with all the people in the neighborhood, nor do I know all their names, but I pretty much know their stories, who's nuts, who's old, where the trouble is, where the cop lives, where the mean people live, all of those types of things. But I'm comfortable there, I like living close to my Mom and I can't imagine moving, at least not while she's still alive. I have lived other places before but when I decided I was staying where my family is, I couldn't imagine living anywhere else than in our neighborhood.

vote-for4vote-against

Unfortunately, no.
My neighbors across the street are much older than me, but I talk to them whenever I see them. They're nice and help keep an eye on things.

I have new neighbors behind me, and twice I have made something to bring to them, but still haven't found time to get over there to introduce the fam.

My other neighbor has a meticulous lawn and I am sure he hates being next-door to me since I don't care much about the lawn.

Caddy-corner, I know nothing about them other than they seem to take a lot of short trips throughout the day. Maybe heading to the sto' to get smokes or a 40 or the like. I'm not really sure. It really bothers my wife, but I keep reminding her that there is no law preventing someone from driving from their house whenever they want, as many times as they want.

vote-for4vote-against

I have lived in my apartments for two years and have never met my neighbors. My leasing office tries to bring us together with pool parties, movie nights, etc., but I'm just not interested.

vote-for4vote-against

i know em enough to wish a sinkhole would open up under their house.

vote-for3vote-against

In the midwest I knew nearly every neighbor on both sides of the street on the whole block. Now in northern New England, I know my immediate neighbors but we're not really friends, just cordial I can small talk with them.

vote-for3vote-against

Heck, I'm either related to or not-quite related to over half of my neighbors! I've got 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cousins both directly across the street and kind of catty-corner. My uncle's (married to my dad's sister) mom lives in the only other inhabited house on my block, and his brother lives across the street to the side of my house. My uncle's sister lives in the house behind my 3rd and 4th cousins. Only 2 houses (1 of which is uninhabited) and 1 trailer in my immediate neighborhood don't contain family/almost family.

The funniest thing is that even though I'm related to a quite a few people in my town, I'm not blood-related to the biggest family group in town.

vote-for3vote-against

I live in an apartment in Los Angeles, and I don't know anyone except the guy downstairs because we had a conflict over his loud late night TV habit.

However, I know my parents' neighbors in Northern CA, and they always introduce themselves when someone new moves in on their street.

vote-for4vote-against

I know all my neighbors.

vote-for3vote-against

Does anyone really know their neighbors?

vote-for7vote-against

Yep, the guy next store has the hottest wife on the block!

vote-for6vote-against

After 35 years here, I'm the unofficial "old lady of the block," being both the oldest resident (as far as I can tell) and the resident who's lived on the block the longest. All the other owners have aged out and moved away or died, and a few have gone through two full cycles. My husband, who's lived here 14 years, knows more or less everyone, at least to chat with. We don't socialize with any neighbors, but we're happy over-the-fence-chatty with the families on each side of our house.

The house on one side was the neighborhood crack house (complete with hookers, drug dealers, a murder, and several other shootings) for about four years, till the cops finally managed to get it shut down. The entire block of neighbors used to joke that the only time we all saw each other was at midnight when we'd gather in the street to watch the police and rescue units doing their thing after another shooting. That house was bought, flipped, and sold to a really nice family a few years ago, thankfully.

vote-for3vote-against

@mkentosh: Did you mean the "guy next door"? :)

vote-for2vote-against

I tried to when I first moved in to this place. But the day I moved in the upstairs neighbor asked me to turn down my TV...

At 6PM on Super Bowl Sunday. The game wasn't even over, and I was watching it by myself on about 16, exhausted from unpacking.

Since then I realized people around here are a-holes.

Every now and then I forget to turn my alarm off when I'm out of town...

vote-for-1vote-against

That really a good question set people thinking... IMO, everyone hope to make friends and be cared in their hearts, but because of the so- called busy or distrust or the habit of being cold, we are losing the opportunity to care and to be care...hope to change!

vote-for2vote-against

I do know my neighbors- 4 houses down's worth on either side, plus some from across the street. This may be skewing the data, though, because many of them are older and may have been brought up when it was more of a custom to introduce yourself and be more friendly.

vote-for5vote-against

I know the ones who have elementary school aged children because I have one. We also know the neighbors to either side of us (no kids that age) and a few others who are just friendly types. Several of them have volunteered to watch my son until my parents arrive from out of state when I go into labor, even if it's some ridiculous time of night.

Never thought I'd find a neighborhood like this, to be honest. It really seems that most people these days just want to mind their own business and ignore the rest of the world unless someone's dog is going on their lawn. We have fire pit s'mores in driveways, watch the kids when schedules get hectic, go out shopping together, and keep up to date on each other's families and lives. It's pretty darned near perfect, and I feel very lucky.

vote-for3vote-against

@elandria: Sounds like the neighborhoods I grew up in in Michigan and Illinois as a kid. The kind you see in old TV shows but not much in reality any more. I remember houses with no fences so the back yards all formed one block sized community park where all the kids played together. Swingsets and sandboxes were more or less community property, and moms would put out Koolaid and cookies or apples on the picnic table of their own yard with the expectation that every kid on the block would help themselves. You could knock on any door when you needed to use the bathroom, and everyone knew everyone's names. I feel sad for kids safely fortified in the walls of their own homes, missing out on the wild adventure and exploration (and occasionally danger) that shaped me into the person I am today.