questionsanyone ever used pre-printed dvds?

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You can buy self-adhesive photo paper the size of a disc that just sticks onto the front of the CD/DVD. You can find them on Amazon, etc. I know they will sell them at your local off store too, it is just normal paper that you run through your printer. You use a template in Illustrator/Photoshop to design your cover to the correct size. Then you just need a device like this to press the label onto the CD/DVD.

Again, all of this can be found at your local office supply store, and will just run through a normal inkjet or laser printer.

If this is an option for you I'm sure it is cheaper than paying someone to make it for you.

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@eraten: I've considered the paper adhesive labels, and used them before for CDs. I don't want to use them for DVDs because I no longer have the 'stomper' to exactly center the labels, and labeling them even slightly off-center can make them unplayable.

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@capitalggeek: Awww shucks. I should've just asked before I went into that elaborate answer! Hopefully someone else can help you out.

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I use hub inkjet printable DVD's all the time and than print them with a Canon 6220 which prints directly to the disc. The silk screening, which link you provide, is the way to go for a professional look but if you are looking for a product you can produce at your computer try the inkjet printable route.

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@capitalggeek: The "stomper" used to come in the label packs. The complete kit from Avery is $35.95, and then you'd just need to buy more labels. You could probably find them cheaper on EBay or Amazon, but here they are at Avery:
http://www.cdstomper.com/products/Design_Kits/index.html

I used to use these and then my discs proliferated and I just started writing on them with a sharpie. I understand that both the adhesive labels and the sharpie reduces the archival life of the DVD, so the commercial printing might give you a more archival disc. But all media is ephemeral, backing up old data on new drives on a routine basis is the only real way to archive it (plus this cloud thing that I haven't embraced yet).

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I do have to say that if you want to print on a DVD, glossy labels are cheap and the Neato brand stomper is the best to get.

On the other hand, these people are cheap and I've heard good things:
http://kunaki.com/prices.asp

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@omnichad: Not exactly what I'm looking for for this project. They will burn the data on the disk and drop-ship to retailers or customers. I'm looking more for someone to print labels on disks that I create (or print labels on blank disks that I burn).

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Does your DVD burner support Lightscribe or Labelflash? Different technologies with similar results. They both use special media that allow you to turn the disc over and label with text and/or pictures in another burn process using the DVD drive. It's only monochrome and the media is more expensive, of course. I believe there are different colored media available for Lightscribe to allow for different colored background.
Lightscribe was developed by HP (with others) and I've seen Labelflash on a Gateway machine.

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@capitalggeek: Can't you just upload the files to them and have them ship all to you? At $1.75/ea. including case and disc and actual replication, how can you go wrong?

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Every year I make 50 copies of a promotional DVD for a local Christian camp. This year, I'm seriously considering Kunaki. Even DIY can't beat the quality and price. Between ink and good quality blank DVD's (50 cents in bulk, Taiyo Yuden silver) alone, the $100 they would charge are already surpassed in savings.

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Do NOT use the common paper labels on a DVD. Over time, the paper absorbs a little moisture, and ever so slightly warps the disc. DVDs, being more sensitive and data dense than CDs, end up unreadable. I had a stack that, with labels on, would error out about an hour into the movie. Remove the label (alcohol to loosen the adhesive) and they would read just fine all the way through.
Others from the same stack, that never had a paper label, read no problem.

They do make plastic back labels, but my preference is a DVD printer. I have an Epson R300, several years old now, that prints CD/DVD beautifully. At the time, $60(?) at the Epson outlet.

ptr ptr
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google - DVD paper label - for multiple reports/forum discussions as to why it doesn't work.

ptr ptr
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Epson photo stylus series of printers can print in full color on inkjet-printable discs. Get the hub-printable discs for best results. I have two of these printers (R300 and R340), both were bought for less than $80. labels that you print and stick on look like crap and will eventually start to peel.

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Kunaki is a decent service, but very inflexible (hence the low price). You cannot order pre-printed blank discs that you can record yourself, only the complete packaged deal they have online. Someone mentioned they were replicated - that's not the case since the materials alone would be several times the cost they sell the discs for. You can't make a $50.00 stamper to stamp one $1.00 disc and expect to survive long.

As for sticky labels - avoid them at all costs - especially on DVDs - if you can. They can cause playback issues, peel off during playback and when you tally it all up, they aren't any cheaper then having them done professionally

Direct Ink-jet printing is ok, but water soluble without special (expensive) discs so the prints can bleed or run when wet. What NCI does is use a high end UV cured digital screen printer. Print is full color, permanently bound to the disc (water insoluble) and at $0.51/disc for 100 you'll actually save money over doing it yourself.