questionshave you noticed the rising cost of 'disappearing…

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i've noticed now some rolls say "jumbo" instead of double. because they're less than double. but that's the new thing companies are doing - downsizing the amount of product and charging the same. so you're getting less and paying the same, and they're hoping you don't look at small stuff like that cuz everything looks about right, nothing drastic is going on, like a price hike

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have you considered using root killer in your drainpipes?

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@moosezilla: Yes, I have. It worked a bit. Have had the good(?) fortune to have the most offending tree cut down. It died. Knocking on wood - have not had to summon Roto-rooter in over 2 years. We were on a 1st name basis. Once a year I had the pleasure of their company. Am still afraid to start using 2 ply - there are other trees. :-/

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@w00tgurl: Not charging the same - used to be able to buy 1,000 sheets on sale 4/$1.00. Lucky to pay 50 cents a roll now; usually more.

Isn't this a crappy subject? :-D

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Yes, I've noticed and was not as upset, as when ice cream were put in smaller containers and still labelled as one gallon, for a higher price. I know I know, my priorities are skewered ;)

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@gmwhit: you need to prevent the roots from getting to the drain pipe areas. usually roots grow toward the most moist area around. also consider the average tree looks the same in size underground as above ground. take down the trees while they are young--unless you want to have to replace all the pipes.

there is an actual product for putting in drains that is for killing trees that are rooting into the drains available at most harware type stores.

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@moosezilla: Really,dammit now I'm even more upset, darn economy

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@moosezilla: Thanks for the tip, but these trees were planted the year the house was built - 1957. They are very large, full grown and now reaching the end of their lives. Being a tree-lover, it's painful to have to take a tree down. I cry. The other main offender is now in the process of losing large limbs...it's about to go, too. :-(

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@gmwhit: i had to put it to a loved one as which do you love more: the tree or the sewer system? (actually in my case it was the house-four trying to take out the foundation, one on powerlines, and two rubbing on the roof).

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@moosezilla: So understand. Have the added problem of the city - you must have a permit to take down a tree. They will NOT issue a permit until there is not 1 green leaf left on the tree. Seriously. There is a tree on the city right-of-way in front of my property - it is essentially dead. They are responsible for removal & will not take it down. It has huge limbs that are falling. The entire tree will probably fall onto the street. One did fall a few houses away. Lucky no one was walking/driving by. That tree had been reported as dead. Grrrrrr

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@gmwhit: we have an rv. in order to not put a bind on it's septic tank we did some tp testing. took two pieces of tp in a one pint bottle half full of water shake for thirty seconds. if the tp isn't basically disolved then it's gonna make draining the tank harder (yuck). try it with what you use. we found angel soft works the best (and still doesn't feel like sandpaper).

around here we can't get the city to leave the trees up.

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Growing up, we had to have Roto-Rooter run out our main sewer line every 18 months, regardless of which TP we used; it was just part of owning a home, similar to making sure that the outdoor faucets were turned on (outside) and off (inside) before the first frost or that the sidewalk was cleared of ice and snow.

We also have similar restrictions on cutting down or pruning trees on city property and it can take years for the city to deal with trees in dangerous shape.

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@w00tgurl:

I haven't looked recently, but for Charmin anyway, the Double rolls were double the number of sheets of a standard roll and the Jumbo rolls were a little bit less than triple the number of sheets of a standard roll. Doubles fit but Jumbos are too large the last time I looked at it.

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If roots are getting into your sewer pipes, and the house was built in 1957, you should probably think about replacing the pipes.

If you're lucky, they're ceramic and have started cracking. If you're not lucky, they are 'Orangeburg' - basically rolled up tarpaper.

I also noticed the shrinking tp by comparing the size of the center tube that the kids used for a marble raceway. About 1/2 inch shorter than several years ago.

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When I do a cost comparison on TP, I compare the square feet on the package and whether it is one-ply or two-ply, not the number of sheets, which is disingenuous. I like shopping at places where they have the little key that tells me the price per square foot for each, so I don't have to crunch numbers in my head. For the past few months or so I have been buying recycled though, even if it costs a bit more. Fortunately it's pretty competitive. Like you, I love trees. This article convinced me to switch to recycled paper products: "If every household in the United States replaced just one roll of virgin fiber toilet paper (500 sheets) with 100% recycled ones, we could save 423,900 trees. If every household in the United States replaced just one roll of virgin fiber paper towels (70 sheets) with 100% recycled ones, we could save 544,000 trees." http://www.nrdc.org/land/forests/gtissue.asp

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@capitalggeek: I'm impressed that you have knowledge of "Orangeburg" pipes. They are obsolete, and are constantly failing(collapsing). Always use a Fernco coupling to replace them with PVC/DWV pipes. I believe the "ceramic" pipes you refer to are actually clay tile pipes that have cracks in the joints that roots easily find their way through.