questionsi have a friend looking for a baby crib

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Since we went with a standard crib (and it was 6 years ago), I can't comment on models. But tell your friend to take her time. People rush to have the nursery ready before the baby arrives, then discover that it is more convenient to keep the baby in your bedroom until he/she is able to sleep through the night.

Also, my impression is that convertible items in general involve design compromises that sometimes prove undesirable. Take the convertible sofa, for example. They weigh a ton, cost extra, and make lousy beds to boot. I don't know much about this type of crib, but I would expect that convertibles would have higher recall rates than regular cribs due to the more complicated designs involved. Finally, if your friend is planning to have more than one child, the convertibility becomes less of an asset.

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I would suggest you NOT buy used from craigslist, cribs get a lot of wear and tear as the kid gets older. Suggest or even gift them with a consumer reports online account they do tons of safety reviews on baby stuff. You also might tell them that the CPSC has a emailing list of new recalls they can subscribe to stay up to date. :-)

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@heymo: speaks the truth. Additionally, the child will need a regular bed at some point so it is generally more economical to go from a crib to a regular bed. Standard cribs are easier to manage and clean as well.

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@tygerdave: Missed the Craigslist part in @hobbit's posting. I'd vote for your point about used cribs multiple times if I could.

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@tygerdave: thanks for that tip. she has one of those accounts already. She is sitting across the table from me as type. all of the cribs she is looking at online she will review and visit before she actually buys.
she is aware of the weight of a convertible crib. Her reason for doing this is that she does not want to buy a crib and then months later buy a toddler bed, then a year later buy a regular bed.

so feel free to post deals.
the system she is most interested in is the Stanley Young America

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@hobbit: Is this your friend's first child? I have the feeling that it is. A baby usually stays in a crib for around two years, not a few months. As @wootvan said, better to go from the crib to a regular bed. Toddler beds are rather a wasted of money. Convertable cribs are quite expensive, and I don't think that you get your money's worth out of them.

I have many cousins who have large families, and I just called one of them for an opinion. Her response was that a good used crib would be much better than any convertible crib, and that you could just as easily check on used ones as new (in those recall lists). She also implied that toddler beds were for people with large disposable incomes. Okay, that's not really the way she phrased it.

What she really said was "If your child is old enough to object to a crib, they're going to object to being in a baby bed instead of a big kid bed, too." Save your money for kid's shoes. You'll need it.

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@shrdlu: You're 100% right about the toddler bed ripoff scheme. Our older daughter jailbroke her crib at 22 months and refused to stay in it. We went to the baby supply store to get bedrails, and one of the employees "helpfully" suggested a toddler bed.

Well, you can guess the rest: she slept in the toddler bed a total of two nights. The third night, she moved to a rug at the opposite end of the room. The fourth night we found her curled up like a puppy up at the foot of the twin bed already in her room. On went the bedrails; the toddler bed went into storage.

Our second daughter loved her crib, and never bothered to climb out. A month before turning 3, she announced that she wanted a "big-girl bed" for her birthday. We set up a bed in her room, and moved the bedrails in from big sister's bed.

Almost a year later, the toddler bed is still in storage, waiting for our next garage sale.

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If she wants used then a consignment sale is a good bet. Get there early for a bigger selection

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@heymo: The rule in my extended family is:

If they can explain why they don't want to be in a crib (in reasonable language), they can have a big kid bed. If they are cogent reasons, they should be honored. Around two is a likely time (although girls usually talk earlier than boys, either sex is likely to object to a crib at about the same age).

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Yes this is their first child. We are all very excited. It is a small community and in a way the baby is going to be raised by the village. With that said......and now that I am at home and not typing on my tiny keyboard what she is looking for is a system where she doesn't have to buy something new each stage, but just get the next add on. The Stanley Young America Grow with you system (or a system like this) apparently allows parents to change the size the of the furniture as a child grows and with pieces purchased at less than the cost of buying an entirely new bed will grow with a child all the way up to a double bed - yes it is still a racket I am sure. The other pieces that can come with it, changing table, high chair etc also adjust to other pieces like a desk, dresser and stool. Her objection to furniture is buying stuff or even getting stuff every time the child grows out of one stage or another, she will always get it used. We are both garage and yard sale divas.

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@hobbit: Is she planning on having more children? If yes then is she planning on buying another system like this with the second child (when she suddenly needs a crib and doesn't have one)?

Try to look at this from a different perspective. Would this furniture be her first choice in appearance, style & quality if she was redecorating a five-year-old's room? If not then she may want to pause and rethink this. I've seen more than one friend struggle to make sets like this "work" as time passes because they paid such a premium initially.

I would recommend going to the bookstore and looking at photos of nurseries in decorating books & magazines. She'll see that there are a lot of fun and creative ways to put a nursery together. Changing pads can be mounted (with hidden screws on the back) on top of ordinary dressers or desks. Simple bed rails allow a standard bed to be used as a toddler bed. She'll end up with items that she would rather live with by thinking outside of the box.

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@hobbit: Systems like this are much like most multi-use items. They're ok but not great at any stage. Cribs & high chairs are easy to sell when no longer needed.

I understand that she is thinking about what items will be needed as the child grows. Most of miniwooter's friends have either bunkbeds or twins with trundles in their rooms because they are better for sleepovers. Miniwooter has a full-size bed in her room with a small trundle that is now too short for her friends. It takes up a lot of floor space & will eventually be too short for her. It's in her room because it's a beautiful antique rope bed (family piece). Unfortunately a full doesn't work well as a guest bed or for sleepovers.

She can use something like this instead of a toddler bed: http://deals.woot.com/deals/details/02c7d6e8-04f6-4e2b-af8d-f6b3b739ac67/regalo-sleeptite-double-bed-rail-33-off.

I will keep my eye out for these systems. Just keep her out of the new mom retail trap (10X what she needs).

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@glindagw: thanks. I think the biggest retail trap is convincing new parents that they must buy it new. ;) We all know that used is just fine as long as it isn't beat up too badly. I know my brother's crib was a family piece. Mine probably was too, I am also the reason that they created toddler beds - you all do not know how many times I climbed over the rail and fell out of my bed. I was opposed to being fenced in.

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@hobbit: The good news is that toddler beds are used for the shortest amount of time. They are inexpensive & easy to find at yard sales.

Why would you climb out of a bed with rails when you can just scoot down to the end of the bed to get out? One of my girlfriends had an escape artist. We went out of town for a conference. When we returned I almost fell over laughing. Her husband had attached hinges & a plywood lid to the crib. We're still teasing him about that ten years later.

I would recommend buying a new baby mattress unless she knows where it's coming from.

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@glindagw: it was the late 60's bed rails didn't have an end like that. they went from one end of the bed to the other. I should also point out I tried to climb out of my crib too.