questionshave you eaten potatoes with red or purple flesh?

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There is a stand down at the local Farmer's Market that sells several different types of potatoes. (we still haven't tried them all) The first ones we tried were the purple Peruvian potatoes and they are excellent! Just be prepared for strange looks if you decide to make mashed potatoes with them... they end up being a strange shade of purple/grey.

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ditto as @unclefrog, we also had smashed purple potatoes. they looked funny, but tasted like potatoes, and word on the street is they had a different variety of nutrients in them.

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I've had several varieties and all have been good or better.

I like that we are seeing more variety amongst our food choices. Sometimes I'm left wondering about just how large the carbon footprint of that weird vegetable/fruit/berry down at the market is, but I do like to try new things.

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I had the red and purple potatoes with some crawfish a couple of months ago. I liked the taste but it had been boiling in crab boil for a couple hours so everything tastes good.

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We get the purple ones from Costco-they're great roasted with olive oil/garlic/rosemary. If you forget about them in the pantry for a month or so, you'll have some for planting.

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Costco sells a bag with a mix of purple, red, and gold potatoes and besides the strange color there is no markable difference in taste between them an something like a Yukon gold or a red skinned potato.
For the most point you should avoid the big russet potatoes, not because there is anything bad about them, but because most of the nutrients have been engineered out of them in attempts to make them bigger and easier to grow. Even switching to the more common red or gold potatoes will bring a lot more nutrients to the table.

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I haven't tried the purple ones, but they sound like they'd make some fun mashed potatoes. (Adding them to the shopping list...)

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@baqui63: Carbon footprint? These are potatoes.

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Yeah I'm really worried about my potato carbon footprint....NOT!!!!!

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Yes and they are awesome.
That is all.

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@justagigilo85: well I guess some of us lack such an elite sense of enlightenment and environmental knowledge. Care to educate?

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@davidschronic: Maybe they're talking about how these "exotic" fruits & veggies have traveled around the world to get to their local market? I mean I guess, but I can think of a thousand things (including surfing the internet) that have a larger footprint than a delicious potato. As far as I know MOST potatoes grown domestically, so they're not sitting 1st class on a 747 from Bolivia to get to your market.

Either way, I find that red potatoes are excellent for cutting into cubes and throwing on the grill. Maybe its just psychological, but I think they taste better, and grill better!

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ah yes. the controversial potato discussion.

come on now.

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I've had purple carrots, they're pretty tasty. Never seen the purple potatoes though.

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I love purple potatoes. They're my favorite. There are many varieties of these (and I couldn't tell you the names of a single one, because I'm too lazy to check on it). When you see darkly colored food (like purple potatoes, or carrots, or string beans, as examples), they often contain more nutrients than the standard grocery store items.

I also like the little French Fingerlings, which have pink stripes running through them. I don't grow any of the purple potatoes because I don't eat that many (of any variety), and would rather just buy them at the farmer's markets. Here's a pretty good carrot for the gardeners on the list:

http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1190

These are really reddish purple, and not purple, but they are very tasty.

Although I haven't tried these, they're purple, and look just like other purple ones I've had.

http://www.reimerseeds.com/purple-haze-carrots.aspx

Shrdlu loves carrots. :-D

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@davidschronic: @eraten sums it up. The potato itself may not give off green house gasses in a "carbon footprint" sense, but the cost of growing (fertilizer, irrigation), transportation all factor into this.

It's not about environmental knowledge. It's being able to see the bigger picture.

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@hossdawg97: I just realized that you wanted to know where you could buy these. While you can actually buy potato seed (yes, yes, you can), I don't recommend trying, and you'd find it difficult to grow from seed. Grocery store potatoes often do not grow properly, when divided, since they've been in cold storage, but you can probably pick up some from the farmer's market. The thing is, unless you live in a temperate climate, the year is getting on in timing for you to have success in growing them.

Here's a crazy guy that likes growing them from seed.

http://www.curzio.com/N/Potato_starting_from_seed.htm

Here's a good place for you to get seed potatoes.

http://www.groworganic.com/seeds/seed-potatoes.html

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@pemberducky: "Come on now"
Thanks Gob!

I like the colored potatoes
< insert racial stereotype of your choice >

j5 j5
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@shrdlu: I was thinking of getting some for my father to grow next year. He grows a fairly large truck patch every year.

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Red Potatoes are better for baking. My preferred method is to cut them into wedges, toss them in olive oil, seasoning salt, and pepper. Bake them until they are soft all the way through. They are more gummy, so deep frying doesn't work well. Mashed potatoes tend to be more gummy with straight red (that's what russetts are for).

The purple potatoes that I'm familiar with are the purple sweet potatoes found in Asia (not Taro). Filipinos call them Ube and they are good. Boil them (peeling is optional), dip them in a little bit of cane sugar and that is all you need! They also make ice cream out of it. Pretty good stuff especially in Halo Halo (google it).

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@hossdawg97: Then that second link is ideal, unless you have a local source that will sell you seed potatoes. I used to like Seeds of Change, but have had friends report various difficulties with them, and so cannot recommend them. I buy my onion sets and seed potatoes locally (although you have to be QUICK to get the purple ones, which sell out the first). The Grow Organic site is pretty reputable, and you can get a good selection of purple (and other) potatoes from them.

Do also consider the Red Thumb Fingerling, which is flavorful and spicy.

I cannot eat store potatoes. I just can't. They are mealy, and have so little taste. Okay, I lied, I'll eat the organic ones, but I'd MUCH rather have local.

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Purple potatoes made the best and most velvety textured mashed potatoes I had ever had. Awesome stuff!!

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Ah, small town life....we have russets and reds here. :(

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Do you mean potatoes with red and purple flesh, (as it says in your question) or red and purple skins (what most people are clearly talking about)? I've enjoyed red "jacket" potatoes since I was a kid, and in recent years have enjoyed purple, rose and yukon gold potatoes. But the only potatoes I have had with colored flesh are yams and sweet potatoes. I've never seen a healthy potato with purple or red flesh, although the purple skinned ones do sometimes have a blossom of purple color right at their center. I use red potatoes most of all varieties, but for simple eating with butter I think yukon golds are the most delicious.

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@moondrake: Purple potatoes exist in both types; purple skin and light colored flesh, and solid purple, all the way through. I've got some in the fridge right now (the purple all the way through kind), and they are deelish.

Take a good solid look at this picture:

http://www.groworganic.com/organic-all-blue-potatoes-lb.html

Yummy.

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@shrdlu: I wasn't doubting the existence of such a thing, but most responses are referring to the potatoes with white flesh and colored skins, only a few seemed to be speaking of potatoes with purple colored flesh and none of potatoes with red colored flesh. Are these the same varieties as the ones with colored skins, or entirely different varieties? I remember my first introduction to red jacket potatoes. We were visiting a Great Aunt in Alabama, and she leased a mile of the highway median to grow potatoes to sell at the Farmer's Market. The ground was so fertile that she just planted them and came back the appropriate time to harvest them, getting about 3 crops a year. She took us out there and we pulled up the ripe potatoes and every sixth one or so we'd cut up into component eyes and drop into the holes were were making pulling out the ripe ones. The first red potato I ever saw was the first one I dug up.

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@moondrake: those "other people" are wrong. This is about flesh.
Most of the colored flesh potatoes I've had are in the sweet potato family, but nowhere near as sweet as the orange ones. Blue potato chips are also yummy and easier to find.

j5 j5
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To clarify, I was indeed referring to the environmental cost of transporting these exotic fruits and vegetables around the world or even just across the country. Basically, that "eating locally" makes the most enviromental sense.

In terms of availability, I would not be surprised if there are 10,000 grocery stores within 30 miles of my home, many with unusual-to-the-average-American produce. However, just because I can get it at a store or one of the ethnic markets within a few miles of my home, doesn't mean that it didn't have to travel hundreds or thousands of miles to get to that store.

Also, I'm talking about potatoes with purple, or red, or orange flesh, not just purple or red skins, and not sweet potatoes or yams (which are not related to potatoes at all, but rather to lilies, IIRC).

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The purple/blue fleshed potatoes that I eat come from our garden so the greenhouse gasses produced by their transportation to my table depend on whether or not I had a jumbo burrito for lunch.

As far as taste is concerned once you get past the novelty of the color, I don't notice much difference from other types of potato. Ours seem to lean more toward waxy rather than fluffy texture-wise.

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@baqui63: I just think your potato carbon foot print is a little ridiculous to worry about. I mean you do drive a vehicle and have purchased some products containing plastic sometime in your life? There are worse things you do to loose sleep over than to be concerned about the impact your potato purchases have on the environment. Silly.

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@davidschronic:

I'm not talking about the purchase of potatoes, but rather the belief that small things do matter and that there is a cost (to all of us, and to our children, etc.) due to environmental issues.

You appear to be a perfect example that illustrates my point but in truth I have no desire to argue it one way or the other. I also do not understand why it seems to matter so much to you that I believe what I do (whether it is silly or not).